Go Down The Hobbit Hole Of The One Ring Starter Set

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Dungeons & Dragons has offered players a chance to get their medieval fantasy stories on for years but there’s always been a desire to play in Middle-Earth and let folks show off how much lore they’ve absorbed from Tolkien. There have been several official RPGs over the years with The One Ring performing well in the eyes of many fans of the films and the books. Free League Publishing acquired the license, held a blockbuster Kickstarter last year for a new edition, and sent me review copies of the material that’s due to be released early this year.

Starter sets are tricky because they need to be accessible enough to get people unwilling to buy a new RPG to try out the set but they also need to have some utility for folks beyond their initial adventures. The One Ring Starter Set aims to please both of these desires by focusing on a popular element of Middle-Earth: The Shire. Both Frodo and Bilbo Baggins start their adventures in the cozy confines of The Shire, so it makes sense for players to do so too. The tales being told with the boxed set aren’t the world shaking epics of Return of the King, but more about Hobbits stumbling into adventure, getting into trouble and out of it again. Writers James Spahn and Francesco Nepitello also make an argument that this boxed set is a good choice for use with kids wanting to get into RPGs. The fairy tale feel of The Shire still offers plenty of good stories without the darker elements of the world like ringwraiths or Sauron.

The production values of the boxed set are top notch as one would expect from a Free League game. The maps of The Shire and Eriador are suitable for framing. They include one of my favorite details from the excellent Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay Starter Set where you can set up the box as a GM screen thanks to important rules printed on the back lit. They also make the curious choice to include a set of cards that cover rules not included in the starter set. Perhaps they wanted to future proof the box a bit more or maybe they figured selling these cards on their own wouldn’t work from a profitability standpoint. The three books included are also in an odd order, with the adventures first, the rules second and The Shire book rightfully last. It’s a nitpicky detail to be sure, but many other starter sets have a very deliberate packing order to help players walk through their experience.

The rules are fairly simple with a central d12 called the Feat die assisted by d6 skill dice looking to hit a target number. The basic target number comes from character attributes with difficulty adjusted by raising or lowering the d6 pool or by using an advantage/disadvantage mechanic with the feat die. This pool generates additional success when the dice top out which can be spent on various effects like bypassing armor or learning more information. As characters get tired from travelling and take damage from fights, their rolls become less effective until they rest. A character who loses too much endurance carrying a lot of equipment, for example, becomes weary and can’t add low numbers to their dice rolls. The One Ring focuses on the toll the journey takes on the heroes which does a lot to differentiate itself from other RPGs where combat is the main focus.

The adventure book contains five stories that help players learn the rules bit by bit. The game being set after The Hobbit but before The Fellowship of the Ring allows the pre-generated characters to connect to the heroes of the main stories in unusual ways. Players can even unlock “canon” characters to play in later adventures of the series. The stories feel like they could be played in an evening or two. They center around Bilbo Baggins needing help with information to include in The Red Book of Westmarch and enlisting friends to serve that purpose. The adventures are solid, though I would like to see more guidance for moving the story forward should the players fail the rolls they need to make while learning the system.

The Shire book makes the strongest argument for purchase by players who have already bought the core rules. The book includes a breakdown of different parts of the area while including various rumor tables and charts with inspirational encounter suggestions. This is useful for GMs who want to extend their adventures in The Shire while also proving useful to groups with the full book who may want to return there for a while. These tables are a source for tables who want some intrusions of darkness into The Shire with the results of rolling Sauron’s Eye on the Feat dice showing that a darkness is coming outside the Hobbit world’s borders.

The One Ring Starter Set seems poised for the best success with fans of the films or the books. It also seems like a good choice for people who have tried Dungeons & Dragons but want something that’s a little more narrative while still full of fantasy flavor. Setting the game in between the main stories reminds me of the classic WEG Star Wars RPG: there’s a lot of stuff that’s name checked for players to explore but the world hasn’t been uprooted by the main story yet. Tolkien told a lot of these side stories in his own writings and this box gives players a chance to fill in even more gaps of Middle-Earth’s history.
 
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Rob Wieland

Rob Wieland


GreyLord

Legend
I really dislike the trend of starter sets...or more to the point, starter sets which have NO CHARACTER GENERATION rules.

Give me a set where I can create my OWN characters after the initial play through. THAT will do FAR more in getting me interested in a system, or knowing if I am interested in a system than simply making me play through with pre-generated characters in pre-generated adventures. That gives a taste, but not enough of a taste to know whether you like it or not.

It's like going to a coffee shop and them letting you have a sniff...not a REAL taste, just a sniff. How can you know if you REALLY actually like the coffee after that?

Not that this really has anything to do with this starter set, except that the review indicates that it continues this trend that started some years ago of offering a starter set that's really not much of an offer for how much they normally cost (give me the material offered for $2 or maybe free and I might consider it something worthwhile, but as it is...these starter sets aren't starter sets as they don't really start anything (unless you want EVERYONE to have the EXACT SAME CHARACTERS), and more like a small sampling of a small part of the game (IMO).

In otherwords, no intention of getting the starter set from what I read in the review, which means, though I like the creators and their stuff, no closer to being convinced to try out the One Ring either.
 


GreyLord

Legend
"Give me three softcover books, a card deck, a dice set, and a large poster map for free or I won't check out your game" isn't the strong incentive you think it is.
The thing is, I DON"T really care about the large poster map, or a card deck (unless it's actually required to play the game).
If I want to learn about a game and how to play it, I'm concerned about the RULES and the items I need to actually play the game.

Everything else is just icing on the cake.

Giving me icing without the cake is sort of...well...there are those who LOVE icing, but personally, I'd rather have cake. If given the choice between icing or the cake, give me cake any day of the week.

An RPG without a way to create your character isn't really giving one a taste of what the game is all about or like fully, it's like hiding how hard or easy it is to actually PLAY YOUR OWN character that YOU WANT rather than playing something that they WANT you to play.

D&D basic gave all the basic rules (WITH character creation) away so that they could get people to play...AND IT WAS FREE. They had a starter set, but with it came a way to get the FREE RULES.

So, no, I don't care about the other stuff. If I want to learn about a game and whether I would like to play the full game or not, GIVE me the actual game. I don't care about the other stuff if I am curious about something, I want the actual stuff that tells me whether I want to buy the full game or not.
 


Anthro78

Explorer
The thing is, I DON"T really care about the large poster map, or a card deck (unless it's actually required to play the game).
If I want to learn about a game and how to play it, I'm concerned about the RULES and the items I need to actually play the game.

Everything else is just icing on the cake.

Giving me icing without the cake is sort of...well...there are those who LOVE icing, but personally, I'd rather have cake. If given the choice between icing or the cake, give me cake any day of the week.

An RPG without a way to create your character isn't really giving one a taste of what the game is all about or like fully, it's like hiding how hard or easy it is to actually PLAY YOUR OWN character that YOU WANT rather than playing something that they WANT you to play.

D&D basic gave all the basic rules (WITH character creation) away so that they could get people to play...AND IT WAS FREE. They had a starter set, but with it came a way to get the FREE RULES.

So, no, I don't care about the other stuff. If I want to learn about a game and whether I would like to play the full game or not, GIVE me the actual game. I don't care about the other stuff if I am curious about something, I want the actual stuff that tells me whether I want to buy the full game or not.
Maybe you're not the target market for this product?
 

GreyLord

Legend
Maybe you're not the target market for this product?

Probably not.

I would have thought the target market would be people INTERESTED in trying out a new RPG who might actually buy the full game if they liked what they saw....

But apparently not?

If the market is to try to attract NEW players who have NEVER PLAYED an RPG before (arguably what these Starter Sets are supposed to be doing) I'd say it's a lost cause, because most new players will gravitate to something that they know about more and easier to find (Such as D&D, which as I mentioned before, has a starter set but also a direct link with it [or it did, I suppose the news ones still do] where one could get all the Basic rules as well). People not familiar to RPGs do not normally target your FLGS, they go to stores like Walmart or Target where they can find the D&D starter set (but none of these other starter sets made for them apparently).

When I see things like this, that try to copy the D&D starter set idea, without actually realizing the marketing behind it and how it works (direct them to actual rules where you can create the character and a full game if you want to guide them to the even fuller game of the Core 3, etc) it does not surprise me when they have sales that are NOWHERE close to D&D, or even to what they COULD be if the actually used these tools effectively.

So, in that light, perhaps I and many others who have played RPGs and don't need to be introduced to the concept, but would like a sample of whether a game is good or bad before we dive fully in are NOT the key audience they are catering too (though with the way they MARKET these starter sets, they would have a LOT more sales if they actually made the sets to cater to those who are RPG players looking for something beyond just D&D these days).

They are trying to attract those who never played an RPG before...but don't make their starter sets available to those who have never played an RPG before by putting these starters sets in Target, Walmart, etc. Doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me. Sure, they are at the FLGS (or some of them), but that's not catering to their target audience in that case, or at least with how these Starter Sets are designed.
 



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