log in or register to remove this ad

 

Help me choose a VTT

Nilbog

Snotling Herder
Hi all

So I'm not totally new to the world's of VTTs, however I'm looking for people's opinions on which might best suit me.

Prior to the CV-19 lockdown our face to face game of which I am DM is a pathfinder 2e campaign and we used the setup of using a horizontal TV to display battlemaps on, which physical miniatures were placed on top of. This was done via me using an iPad pro running a DM instance of roll20 and a laptop hooked up to the TV running a player instance, and by the by it worked.

When the lockdown hit, we like many others moved online and because of the lack of roll20 support for pf2e I started a new 5e campaign using the same roll20 account, and again this has been fine.

Now, I'm doing some forward planning for my face to face game, and although I don't anticipate it happening anytime soon, I'd like to be ready for when it does. The problem is I'm only a basic subscriber to roll20 and I'm hitting hard limits about what I can upload. So before I shell out for the premium account, I was wondering if there are any more suitable options out there for my setup so:

  • Must work on both iPad and pc, so likely browser based
  • Ease of map creation (including the ability to import graphic files) is the priority, I'd like something fairly, flexible, intuitive and preferably once the basics have been mastered quite powerful. Animated elements would be a really big bonus
  • Dynamic lighting isn't that important as we don't use tokens, but I would like fog of war
  • Ruleset integration not needed, it won't be used for anything other than showing battlemaps, all character sheets etc will be outside the software
  • Would only need a DM and one player license
  • Touchscreen friendly, because I DM on the iPad I'd like it to play well with the iOS touchscreen, something I've found a bit fiddly with roll20
So it maybe upgrading roll20 is the best option, but I'd be happy to know if there is anything out there that would fit my needs better.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
I've spend a lot of time testing different VTTs this past year, especially in the past few months. Some other things I need to know before making any recommendations.

1. These are your requirements NOW. But eventually you'll be running games in person. Do you want a VTT thats as good for in-person games as it is for remote, on-line games?

2. Do you need to work on the game when you don't have Internet?

3. Do you only care about the battlemap and tokens or do you want to have more advanced automations, character sheets, access to the rules, ability to have all adventure content in the system?

4. Do you want to use it for systems other than Pathfinder 2e or is that the only system you intend to run on the VTT?

5. Are you a heavily prep DM or do you like to do things on the fly? Is your campaign more sandboxy or railroady? Do you need the ability to quickly find and throw up a map and monster tokens in the middle of the game or do you expect to have everything prepped in advance?

6. Do you prefer to run official material (e.g. Paizo APs for Pathfinder) or do you do mostly homebrew?
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
If it helps you, here is what I've recently decided on and why.

I have experience with Map Tool, Fantasy Ground, d20pro, Astral VTT, Roll20, and The Foundry.

For a while now, for the games I run, I've run them in Map Tool. Even when I had the Fantasy Ground Unity Ultimate subscription at $10 per month, I never ran a game in it and continued to use Map Tool. Same with Roll20, loved being a player in Roll20 games, but never got further than experimenting with it as a subscriber. Never bothered to run a game in it.

My MUST HAVES:

1. Ability to QUICKLY pull up a map and run it without any prep.
2. Ability to deal with (navigate, filter, and load) larger images, hundreds of maps, hundreds of tokens.
3. Ability to use for in-person games
4. Ability to use off-line
5. Ability to have basic fog-of-war with ability to manually reveal areas to players
6. Area-of-effect templates

My STRONG WANTS

1. I don't want my players to have to download and install software.
2. I would like to have the advanced lighting, fog of war auto-reveal through player token movement, and line of sight features -- but NOT HAVE to use them
3. Support for automating aspects of combat
4. Ability to import character sheets from D&D Beyond
5. Ability to run games online with players moving their own tokens.
6. Support for multiple systems and ability to purchase published content

After spending a lot of time and some money testing most of the major products, I am not using The Foundry, hosted on The Forge.

With some third-party modules enabled, the Foundry best meets all my must-haves and wants.

The software is $50. You can install it on more than one machine, but only run games from one instance per license. You can run games from your local PC if you are comfortable with configuring port forwarding on your router and have a good Internet connect. You can host it yourself on your own server via AWS, Azure, or other hosting service if you are comfortable with setting up a Linux server. I ended up deciding that managing my own AWS server for this was too much like work and I ended up hosting it on The Forge.

What makes The Foundry amazing is how it is designed to support developers creating modules to expand on its core functionality. You can customize it to make it work how you want it. Through a module, I can bring D&D Beyond character sheets, monsters, spells, and items into it. Through another module I can integrate with with World Anvil. With the Simple Fog module I can simply load a map with fog applied and use drawing tools to remove fog as the players explore. This is how I've been using Map Tool and allows me to use it with a very sandboxy campaign where players may go somewhere that I don't have maps and monsters prepped for in the VTT.

I can have the full, advanced VTT experience with lighting, line of sight, weather effects, etc. Or just throw up a map on the fly.

The 5e system support is not as advanced as Fantasy Grounds. But the combat tracker, character sheets, ability to import from D&D Beyond, meet my needs. And there is a very active community of modders who keep improving on the experience.

Whether running it from your local PC or a server, your players only need a Web browser to access. No need for them to download anything.

While I'm running it from a server. I also have it installed on my PC. If I ever need to I can run locally and off line.

While I'm a convert to The Foundry, its very customizability made it a more complex to get started with than other tools. If you don't want to bother with hosting it yourself, then you have to deal with two purchases. A one-time purchase from the developer for the software and subscription to whatever hosting server you select.

As for the other systems, my recommendations are:

Fantasy Grounds - if you want full support for official WotC content with everything prepped and automated. High learning curve and a love it or hate it interface. I really wanted to love it but Fantasy Ground Unity kept hanging an crashing on me. I could never get FGU to the point where I could run games in it. Also, the hosting service doesn't work from some of the countries I work and travel in. Just to play as a player with Fantasy Ground Classic during virtual Gary Con, I had to use a VPN and a cellular 3G connection. The DM expressed having to do something similar to run games from China in the past. So despite really wanting to make FG work, it just never worked out for me and I cancelled my $10/month FGU subscription.

Roll20. I'm a fan. Roll20 kept me sane when I started my new job and had to spend lots of time working away from home in countries with crap internet and from which many companies block connections. Roll20 always worked, no matter where I was. Even when Internet wasn't great, I could still usually particpate in games, via a tethered Google Fi 3G connection if nothing else. I love the find-a-game feature. But as a DM, it wasn't for me. I subscribed for a few months but never ran a game from it. First, you HAVE to be online for it to be useful. But a bigger issue was that I'm running a multiyear campaign with hundreds of maps and most of the maps are large files. I found it difficult to manage a large number of assets in Roll20. When I did prep a larger map with lighting and line of sight, performance would suffer greatly. It was just too difficult for me to use for the large sandboxy mega dungeon I'm running.

But for most DMs, I think Roll20 is an excellent tool and it is the one I recommend the most.

d20Pro - great tool for DMs running d20 systems like D&D and Pathfinder. Not so good for other systems. By far the easiest to manage combat it. You can get some but not all official WotC content for it. I passed on it mainly because I didn't find it convenient for throwing up maps on the fly.

Map Tool. Huge fan. First, it is free. Second, it has more advanced VTT features than most of the commercial products. Third, there is an active community developing frameworks to customize it for your preferred game system. The downside is that hosting games over the internet requires a good internet connection and ability to configure port forwarding on your router. I was unable to do that when working abroad so I would run two instances of it. The host instance and a player instance and I would share the player instance window using Google Meet. I loved that I could quickly filter through hundreds of maps and many more hundreds of tokens and throw up a map and drop tokens on the fly. No other VTT tools I've used does this as well.

But ultimately, I moved to Foundry from Map Tool because I wanted to host games where players could move their own tokens, even when in areas where I don't have good internet, and didn't want to require my players to download and install software to play in my games. Also, the Foundry is just a nicer tool to work in and customizing the Foundry with its module management system is much easier a less glitchy than customizing Map Tool.

Astral - It is pretty. Great for line of sight and lighting. But terrible for low-prep play.
 
Last edited:

Bilharzia

Fish Priest
  • Must work on both iPad and pc, so likely browser based
  • Ease of map creation (including the ability to import graphic files) is the priority, I'd like something fairly, flexible, intuitive and preferably once the basics have been mastered quite powerful. Animated elements would be a really big bonus
  • Dynamic lighting isn't that important as we don't use tokens, but I would like fog of war
  • Ruleset integration not needed, it won't be used for anything other than showing battlemaps, all character sheets etc will be outside the software
  • Would only need a DM and one player license
  • Touchscreen friendly, because I DM on the iPad I'd like it to play well with the iOS touchscreen, something I've found a bit fiddly with roll20
So it maybe upgrading roll20 is the best option, but I'd be happy to know if there is anything out there that would fit my needs better.
Looking at your requirements I would say any screensharing application that works on iOS would work for you. You are not using tokens, not using character sheets, not using a ruleset reference, all you want to do is show a map (and images?) and reveal it, if so why not control all that with the software on your tablet/PC and just screenshare with your players?
 

Nilbog

Snotling Herder
Wow, that's an incredible reply thank you.

My wishlist is very similar to yours. I will check out the foundry. To answer your questions:

1) this will be for in person play only. I will be continuing my roll20 campaign as the only game when we can't game in person

2) internet access is desirable, but not a necessity, as long as the system can support a DM and player client I'm happy.

3) battlemaps only, I won't be using tokens or any other form of effects for characters, this will be handled via physical miniatures. Area effect tools would be a nice to have but not essential

4) no system rules integration required, it's purely for battlemaps, as long as it supports squared grids and fog of war I'm happy

5) prep is about 70/30 for upfront/on the fly, it's a sandbox campaign, where I will have most of the key locations mapped, but I would like to be able to quickly generate something if the players go someone unexpected

6) it's all homebrew, no official module support needed
 

Nilbog

Snotling Herder
Looking at your requirements I would say any screensharing application that works on iOS would work for you. You are not using tokens, not using character sheets, not using a ruleset reference, all you want to do is show a map (and images?) and reveal it, if so why not control all that with the software on your tablet/PC and just screenshare with your players?
That is a very good point, and one I did consider, however I tend to have all my notes and monster details in onenote that I flick over to during the combat and I wouldn't want my players to see this. If there was an app that could be shared rather than the iPad screen that could work, however I'm not sure this is something that is available
 

Bilharzia

Fish Priest
I tend to have all my notes and monster details in onenote that I flick over to during the combat and I wouldn't want my players to see this.
That makes sense, Microsoft Teams might be worth a try, it can share the application and not the screen, at least on PC.
 

SavageCole

Punk Rock Warlord
My experience is similar to MNBlcokhead's and I am a big fan of The Foundry VTT, but it does not meet your requirement that players an use iPad/tablet to play. It's an incredible tool and gets better and cooler all the time.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
Looking at your requirements, I highly recommend Map Tool. It is free and makes it simple to display the player map on another screen, size and apply fog. It has a good set of tools to remove fog of war, including freehand reveal. I've been running Rappan Athuk, with over 100 maps and I have a collection of hundreds of digital tokens. It is a big sandbox and I am never sure where my players will end up. I can throw up a new map and plop down the players in under a minute. I can filter through hundreds of tokens and select the one I want and drag it to the map in seconds.

The reason it was so hard for me to decide among commercial tools was that it was hard to find a tool that was as convenient as Map Tool.

Fantasy Grounds Classic is also good for this, but why spend that kind of money if you are not going to use all bells and whistles.

Foundry is awesome, but really more for folks that like to mod, tweak, and customize.

Start with MapTool and if your needs change, then spend the cash on a commercial product. If you are interested I'll post a quick demo. Map Tool can scare people away but you really can be up and ready in less than an hour. Probably less than 30 minutes if you are are installing on a computer where you already have your maps and tokens (if you are going to use them) saved and organized.


Wow, that's an incredible reply thank you.

My wishlist is very similar to yours. I will check out the foundry. To answer your questions:

1) this will be for in person play only. I will be continuing my roll20 campaign as the only game when we can't game in person

2) internet access is desirable, but not a necessity, as long as the system can support a DM and player client I'm happy.

3) battlemaps only, I won't be using tokens or any other form of effects for characters, this will be handled via physical miniatures. Area effect tools would be a nice to have but not essential

4) no system rules integration required, it's purely for battlemaps, as long as it supports squared grids and fog of war I'm happy

5) prep is about 70/30 for upfront/on the fly, it's a sandbox campaign, where I will have most of the key locations mapped, but I would like to be able to quickly generate something if the players go someone unexpected

6) it's all homebrew, no official module support needed
 
Last edited:

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
My experience is similar to MNBlcokhead's and I am a big fan of The Foundry VTT, but it does not meet your requirement that players an use iPad/tablet to play. It's an incredible tool and gets better and cooler all the time.
Missed the iPad requirement. Not sure I understand this if for in person games that will use miniatures. Is the idea that you want to run it from the iPad? Will you be casting from your iPad to a horizontal display? ProCreate is popular for an iOS run battlemap, but I have no experience with it. I remember testing another app a while back but the name escapes me, "Battle Map 2" I think? It didn't work well for me, although I didn't spend a lot of time trying to make it work, since I run everything from my laptop which has a touch-screen.
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
That is a very good point, and one I did consider, however I tend to have all my notes and monster details in onenote that I flick over to during the combat and I wouldn't want my players to see this. If there was an app that could be shared rather than the iPad screen that could work, however I'm not sure this is something that is available
Sorry for all the posts. Are you wedded to the iPad? Almost every other tool will allow you to share a player instance on a second screen while you run the DM instance as well as all of your other applications on your screen. Not only that, but since the player instance is usually its own window you can share just that window on most web conference apps (e.g., Google Hangouts/Meet, Zoom, Microsoft Teams, etc.)
 

Jediking

Explorer
I am watching this thread - I am looking for a VTT to get into. Have plenty of experience with Roll20 but find that prepping multiple maps for a session or short adventure (have not even attempted a long campaign) can take a while.

My wants:
-5e compatible
-easy map integration
-simple UI - I don't mind a bit of a learning curve, but I don't want to mod anything and don't need real-spell effects or similar
-dynamic lighting
-hand outs, journal, notices, character sheets, extra notes. Somewhere I can make a note of events or NPCs who may come up
-60/40 prep vs improvise. I will set up some set piece encounters and TotM many of the smaller ones. I still like to upload overview images (eg. still-image backdrop of a haunted forest) to keep a sense of where the players are.

@MNblockhead your review has already been a huge help!
 


Nilbog

Snotling Herder
Missed the iPad requirement. Not sure I understand this if for in person games that will use miniatures. Is the idea that you want to run it from the iPad? Will you be casting from your iPad to a horizontal display? ProCreate is popular for an iOS run battlemap, but I have no experience with it. I remember testing another app a while back but the name escapes me, "Battle Map 2" I think? It didn't work well for me, although I didn't spend a lot of time trying to make it work, since I run everything from my laptop which has a touch-screen.
Thank you for all the updates, they've been very useful. I'm pretty much committed to the iPad, for a couple of reasons, physical space at the gaming table is limited, and I can't afford to buy a laptop at the moment

For a bit more clarity my setup is a flat screen TV laid on top of the actual table this has an HDMI cable link to my old desktop pc that sits tucked away in the corner of my room. This desktop is currently running the player instance of roll20

I then use my iPad to run the DM instance of roll20 as well as one note with all my campaign details and also a browser tab with the pathfinder 2 srd to quickly check rule queries
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
I am watching this thread - I am looking for a VTT to get into. Have plenty of experience with Roll20 but find that prepping multiple maps for a session or short adventure (have not even attempted a long campaign) can take a while.
This is an issue with all VTTs. Before dropping Roll20, think about whether you need to use all the features that is taking up your time. Keep in mind that there is an often frustrating learning curve when adopting a new software product. The grass is always greener and all that.

My wants:
-5e compatible
Here is how I rank the tools for 5e compatibility:

1. Fantasy Grounds
Easy number one choice. You can buy all the official material, both rules and adventures. For rules, this means that all the macros and configurations are done for you. Which is a huge time time saver. I've found with systems that require me to create the macros myself or do a lot of data entry in order to get the automations, I don't bother because the prep work is just not fun for me. 5e isn't that complicated. I can run it pen and paper and just use the VTT for moving tokens on a map.

Having the adventures all prepped is great if you run official WotC adventures. You get all the maps pre prepped and all the content in the system. You don't really need the book or D&D Beyond if you have it in FG. But I still like to have the book.

If you don't run WotC adventures and the third-party adventures you run are not available for FG (or you home brew), it can be a lot of work to create in FG. Some people like it, I would rather spend my time in other ways. I've spent a lot of time entering adventures in campaign-management tools like RealmWorks in the past and I have World Anvil now. I prefer these tools for entering info myself when home brewing. For published adventures, however, unless the work is done form me, I would rather just run from the book. I don't want to make a hobby out of data entry.

Problem with FG right now is that Fantasy Grounds Classic is stable and awesome but will be deprecated soon as they are rolling out Fantasy Ground Unity. I did not have a good experience with FGU. It was laggy and crashtastic. I never got to the point where I could run a game in it. It was a major disappointment as I was all ready to go full into FGU and buy all the 5e stuff, even though I already have the books and D&D Beyond. Even through there is a high learning curve, I was willing to put the time in because I saw how great it could be to run 5e games in FG as player using FG Classic. But my experience with FGU was frustrating and I cancelled by ultimate sub after several months of $10 a month.

I do, however, have to call out how amazing the help and learning resources for FG are. FG University is great and the community is very helpful.

2. Roll20
Like FG, Roll20 has officially licensed content, so you can get all the stuff, not just SRD. I don't have experience with how combat automations and such work in comparison to FG because as a player I never had a DM that really made use of them. But it is nice that you can get all the official content in the VTT so you have everything you need for your game in one system.

3. d20pro
Often overlooked. If all you are playing is a D20 system like 5e, seriously consider d20pro. You can get the core books, so you are not stuck with SRD only. But they don't have all the content. Still, if you home brew or use non-WotC content, I would consider it. d20pro has BY FAR the best combat experience for d20 systems than any VTT I've used. It is just so easy to move your token, target enemies and apply damage. It is fun and has a really low learning curve, especially for players.

The d20pro community is also active and helpful and the developer is highly engaged and responsive. Probably the most supportive developer of all the VTTs I've used.

4. Foundry
Nothing official. But there is a very active community that develops the 5e system, so you can get all the SRD stuff. There is also and awesome mod that will import charactersheets, monsters, spells, items, etc. from D&D Beyond. So, while there is more prep work for 5e games needed than with FG, Roll20, or d20pro, it is still pretty easy to prep 5e games. The automation POTENTIAL is amazing, but not mature. You have to make sure that things are calculating properly. I don't really use the automations much. But I do like how character sheets and stat blocks are handled in Foundry. I like it much better than any other system I've used. Very easy to read and roll dice from, especially with mods. I'm still learning how to make full use of combat features and mods. Because it is so customizable, the learning curve is higher. But there are active 5e discussion groups for Foundry on Discord and Reddit. The community is amazing.

5. Map Tool
There is a newer community-developed 5e Framework that is pretty cool. I still love Map Tool. I may still use it for quickly throwing up maps in in-person games, but Foundry has pretty much replaced it for me. If you are technically inclined and like to roll your own customizations, Map Tool may be for you. Foundry is even better, but if you prefer open source, then Map Tool is the best open source VTT.



-easy map integration
Don't know what this means for you. For me, it means:

1. I can find and add a map quickly and on the fly
2. I can size the grid quickly.
3. I can apply fog of war easily
4. I can put tokens on it easily and share with players quickly

For me, I would order the VTTs in this order for easy map integration:

1. Map Tool
I have hundreds of maps in a directory structure nested up to 5 levels deep on my laptop, sync'd with Google Drive. I just point Map Tool to that folder and in its interface I just tick the "include subfolders" and start typing and it filters my hundreds of maps as I type. I select the image and click the option to make a new map from it. Resizing the grid is a little wonky but after a few minutes of practice you can get the grid sized to a map quickly. Under a minute for me to find a map out of hudreds, open it, apply fog of war (I just make it default to have FOW applied to all new maps), add tokens, and display to players.

Great lighting and line of sight tools for a free product. I didn't use these features in Map Tool much, but they seemed comparable to other products.

2. Fantasy Ground (Classic or Unity)
You have to copy all your maps to the folder for your game (boo!), but once you do you have easy access to your hundreds of maps. There is the ability to navigate the maps and search for them. Not as smooth and obvious as Map Tool, but after you figure out where to go to pull up maps it is easy. FG has its own way to organize things that is not intuitive to me, but once you learn the interface, it is easy enough.

Fantasy Ground has the best manual grid alignment of all the VTTs I've used. Very easy to load a map and size the grid. Takes me longer to get a map open, grid sized, fog applied, and tokens on the map than Map Tool, but not much longer.

Advanced lighting and line of sight features in FGC and FGU lag behind other tools, but are being aggressively developed in FGU.

3. Foundry
Similar to FG. Put your maps into the folder or upload them to the hosting site you use. Navigation is intuitive. Filtering, however, doesn't work through subfolders. So you have you everything organized into folders and subfolders, you have to click through them.

Foundry has the best auto grid sizing of any VTT. If you know the dimensions of the image and the pixel size of the grid it can often autoalign the grid. Unfortunately, many battlemap makers do a bad job optimzing their maps for VTTs. Manually aligning grids is quick and easy, but I had trouble figuring out what to do. The grid alignment features could be more intuitive.

Out of the box, Foundry didn't meet my map integration needs. But with the Simple Fog module, I was able to get the same experience I have with Map Tool. I take a bit longer to pull up and start using a map, because you have to create a scene and add the map as the scene background, but overall, it is quick to use.

I find adding walls and lighting to be very easy. Only VTT that compares in terms of ease of adding advanced lighting and line of sight is Astral VTT.

4. Roll20

I found Roll20 to be a bit wonky in terms of prepping maps for lighting and line of sight but sizing grids is easy. My main issue with Roll20 is I find it to become very laggy and glitchy when you have more complex maps with lots of walls, doors, and light sources applied. I really was unusable for my needs as a game master.

-simple UI - I don't mind a bit of a learning curve, but I don't want to mod anything and don't need real-spell effects or similar
d20pro. Hands down.

If you don't mind a bit more of a learning curve, and want more lighting bells and whistles, you may be better off with Roll20, especially since you already know it.

Astral VTT is dead simple to use. But is only good for maps where you will add walls and light sources. Astral VTT does not support just throwing up a map with fog of war that you manually erase.

FG and FGU have steep learning curves. But as a 5e player, it may be worth your time to figure it out. By far the VTT with the best 5e support.

-dynamic lighting
Best dynamic lighting: Foundry and Astral VTT, but they may not meet your other requirements.

FG is playing catch up, but FGU supports or will support some pretty cool effects. I'm just not as up on FG's tools for lighting and line of sight.

d20pro support dynamic lighting and the interface for applying walls, doors, and lights is pretty simple to use.

Map Tool support some advanced lighting tools and was doing this better and earlier than the commercial products. UI isn't as slick, but it is free. I just don't generally recommend it because getting networking figured out for both DM and players can be difficult for many people.

-hand outs, journal, notices, character sheets, extra notes. Somewhere I can make a note of events or NPCs who may come up
For me: Foundry with the World Anvil module. I do my world building / campaign journalling in World Anvil. Foundry has worked with World Anvil to provide a module enabling importing and bidirectional updating of World Anvil content in Foundry. It is very cool. There are other modules that offer different handout and journaling functionality, but I find that Foundry's out of the box articles and the World Anvil module give me everything I need. But just about any way you want to work, there is probably a module to enable it.

Fantasy Grounds also has a full suite of products for this. But I found it to be complicated. I would use for purchased adventures where all the work was done for me. Entering it myself, yuck.

Map Tool - too wonky for me to use for this purpose.

I don't have experience to comment about whatever tools Roll20, d20pro, or Astral have for notes and articles.

-60/40 prep vs improvise. I will set up some set piece encounters and TotM many of the smaller ones. I still like to upload overview images (eg. still-image backdrop of a haunted forest) to keep a sense of where the players are.
Difficult to answer, because prep time can mean many things. If you buy FG and all of the official WotC content and are running WotC adventures, you don't have spend time setting up monsters, treasure tables, etc.

If you just want to throw up maps and some images and take notes, then most of the tools will work well for that.

For heavy improvisation and pen & paper combat I like Map Tool and Foundry.

For encounter and scene improvisation but having all the monsters, magic, character sheet mechanics, then Fantasy Grounds for the win, followed by d20pro (for 5e). But Foundry is up there if you also use D&D Beyond.

@MNblockhead your review has already been a huge help!
Glad to help.
 
Last edited:


Matchstick

Explorer
It's worth noting that Fantasy Grounds Unity is still in beta; expectations should be adjusted appropriately. Classic will most likely not be deprecated soon; they're saying that they will keep Classic "updated and running as long as demand remains high". Considering the status of Unity (which doesn't seem close to release), and that Fantasy Grounds currently recommends Classic users remain on Classic for their games, I think Classic will probably be around for years. I've got FGC and am not at all looking toward Unity until it releases.

I also like Foundry quite a bit. It's new and cool and that means there's a lot of stuff being developed for it. It seems more intuitive to me than anything I've tried other than FG. I'm still trying to comprehend the relationship between the Journal and the Scenes, but for the most part it's been pretty easy to get comfortable with. And you can't beat the price; fifty bucks for all that it provides and no additional cost for the players!
 

COMING SOON: 5 Plug-In Settlements for your 5E Game

Advertisement2

Advertisement4

Top