D&D General How Do You Feel About Established Lore

How Do You Feel About Lore? Choose the closest answer.

  • Published lore is extremely important; my home game uses D&D lore exclusively.

    Votes: 5 5.5%
  • The published lore is somewhat important; it sets certain expectations for my home game.

    Votes: 36 39.6%
  • The default D&D lore is fine I guess, I use some of it and write the rest myself.

    Votes: 32 35.2%
  • The published lore? I try to use as little of it as possible in favor of my own writing.

    Votes: 12 13.2%
  • Lore? What's that?

    Votes: 6 6.6%

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing (He/They)
There's some lively discussion going on in other threads about "lore" in the game. I'm curious how everyone feels about it, and how much of it gets used in our games. So I ask you all: for the game you are currently running at your table, how important is the published lore?

For my part: I don't use a whole lot of it. There is no city called "Waterdeep," there is no such thing as a "mind flayer," and nobody's ever heard of Melf, Tenser, or Mordenkainen. There is a Raven Queen, but only because a player requested her as a warlock patron--so I rewrote her entire history to fit my homebrew cosmology (and to remove sexual assault.) So I was torn between "fine I guess" and "as little as possible," and settled on the former.
 
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Scribe

Legend
If I'm playing in an established world, I use the lore as it sets expectations at a baseline, that everyone who shares knowledge/interest in that 'shared world' can understand.

Not to say you cannot deviate from it, but if my Waterdeep is actually a hamlet, and players come in knowing what Waterdeep actually is, how is that helpful to anyone?
 

I guess the question for me is "for which setting"?

Like, for the Forgotten Realms? I don't run a campaign in the Forgotten Realms, so I care a lot less than I used to.

But for a setting I actually run or would like to run? I personally care quite a lot, mostly in a "don't make the lore suck or be boring" way. It should be good enough quality and interesting enough that I want to use it, and as @Scribe says, it's useful for setting expectations.

4E remains probably the best edition of D&D re: "built-in" lore, but anyone with a more specific setting was likely not using much of it.
 

payn

I don't believe in the no-win scenario
For D&D I have never really cleaved close to it that much at the table. I did really enjoy Eberron in DDO.

I really got into the lore of Golarion of the Pathfinder RPG. I attribute a lot of that to the APs, but also I felt that the setting had much better supplements and material. So, support is a big factor along with taste in flavor.
 

I'm glad they have a default setting(s) for people that want them, and I play in a FR game, but I personally will always want to make my own worlds for the game.
 

James Gasik

We don't talk about Pun-Pun
I feel like I need another option on the poll, lol. I really like reading lore, and I've been learning D&D lore for most of my life now. I don't like it when lore is retconned for no real reason in settings I care about. I tend to use D&D lore in my games, but at the same time, I admit that D&D lore isn't important to a game unless the people playing it want it to be, and I'm perfectly happy to write my own.
 
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iserith

Magic Wordsmith
If I'm using a published setting, I cleave to the lore to the best of my ability. It's pretty much the only reason to use a published setting for me.

Otherwise, I just make it up as we go along, sometimes drawing from lore in the Monster Manual or whatever I half-remember from some source book long ago.
 

prabe

Tension, apprension, and dissension have begun
Supporter
I had a hard time choosing between "somewhat important, sets some expectations" and "fine, I guess, I write a lot of my own." There are expectations the lore sets, and even if I'm writing my own lore for a thing I'm dealing with--leaning into or reacting against--those expectations.
 

Micah Sweet

Level Up & OSR Enthusiast
I feel like I need another option on the poll, lol. I really like reading lore, and I've been learning D&D lore for most of my life now. I don't like it when lore is retconned for no real reason in settings I care about. I tend to use D&D lore in my games, but at the same time, I admit that D&D lore isn't important a game unless the people playing it want it to be, and I'm perfectly happy to write my own.
That is exactly how I feel. I love lore for it's own sake, but I play homebrew. Playing and reading are two different ways to enjoy D&D to me, and I love them both.
 

Vaalingrade

Legend
Good about Eberron, which doesn't do metaplot, very poorly of FR, Dark Sun and DL which love their metaplots. Bad about Planescape for metaplot, alignment and just the whole deal. Ambivalent on Mystara (which is a mixed bag of awesome and absolutely horrible) and Greyhawk because there's no point of hating the eternally dead.

The thing with D&D lore is that most of it was wrought in ancient times and at this point, the viewpoint it's coming from is basically alien to me, filtered through Gonzo Science Fantasy and proto New Weird and singular books and series where you Had To Be There. It's like an inside joke that you're expect to laugh uproariously at, but then have to listen to someone who was there spend twenty minutes to explain to you why it's funny.

I'm also not liking the new multiverse because instead of being a multiverse, they're changing existing things to be Strange Mirrors instead of full alters and that's pretty boring; like the New 52
 

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