D&D 5E If you aren't buying magic items, where will you spend your gold?

Piratecat

Sesquipedalian
I've seen people mentioning that they have excess gold in 5e, largely because magic items aren't generally available to purchase. So the question is, where are you going to spend all that cash?

- purchase a flock of sheep to herd through the dungeon ahead of you. They'll set off traps, and pre-feed monsters!

- boost your luxurious lifestyle to the maximum. Feather beds! A bard to announce you! Your own manservant!

- torchbearers and henchmen! Never carry your own backpack again.

- buy respectability. Purchase a knighthood, or duchy, or noble title for your half-orc barbarian. "That's SIR Bloodrunnel to you, peon."

- tired of defending your home city? Use your funds to improve its defenses. When it's attacked by a hobgoblin army, you'll be two steps ahead.

- become a bard's or artist's personal patron, gaining great art that immortalizes you in the world.

- commission a unique magic item. Put the word out you're hunting for one, or just find an ancient sage who can track it down for you.

- dress up as a mysterious wizard and hire 1st lvl adventurers in taverns. Send them into your own stocked dungeon, and prepare them for tasks you don't want to do yourself.

Okay, what am I missing?
 

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thalmin

Retired game store owner
Perhaps I'll bring back training to make level, like in 1E. That always used up the excess cash, plus explained how you learned the new stuff.
 

Piratecat

Sesquipedalian
I used to love training, but I think it works best with slow advancement.

My PCs are using their funds to buy their way out of the military.
 

steeldragons

Steeliest of the dragons
Epic
Yeah. I never took training out of the game. I know it's not RAW, but paying for some mentoring, time and materials at level up is a great way to spend money...and the players get to feel like they're really getting something "concrete" out of it. And a nice way to introduce contacts/npc's.

Also, piggybacking on your "respectability" idea, but not nobles, I'm going to throw in: Entrepreneurial endeavors. Buy/invest in a shop/inn/tavern/service that can [potentially] make the PCs a steady flow of income -not to mention npc contacts who aren't necessarily "henchmen", but can keep an eye on things/give you news/information when you're back from the last tomb-raiding expedition of killing things to take their stuff.

[Yeah. I like plausible and plentiful npc interaction potential. :) ]

[EDIT: I never took "slow advancement" out of the game either. :p /EDIT]
 

GMMichael

Guide of Modos
How about a caravel and crew, for when you inevitably anger the locals?

A little biased right now, but a coffee plantation would be nice too...
 

Hereticus

First Post
I've seen people mentioning that they have excess gold in 5e, largely because magic items aren't generally available to purchase. So the question is, where are you going to spend all that cash?

My plan is to take influence over a city, increase building of artistic and defensive structures, and attract merchants.
 

SithlordRPGA

First Post
I've seen people mentioning that they have excess gold in 5e, largely because magic items aren't generally available to purchase. So the question is, where are you going to spend all that cash?

- purchase a flock of sheep to herd through the dungeon ahead of you. They'll set off traps, and pre-feed monsters!

Ok this made me laugh you sir win the internet today :)
 


samursus

Explorer
All great ideas! I for one love to implement this kind of non mechanically benefitting stuff in my campaigns. Tricky part to me is figuring out the costs for those ideas. Never really wrapped my head around the D&D economy and how to equivocate dollars to gold pieces.
 

Chocolategravy

First Post
Magic items are generally available for purchase. If they weren't common as dirt they wouldn't be all over the place in the hands of practically every group of 4 or more creatures.
 

Li Shenron

Legend
I know this doesn't directly answer your question, but my favourite approach:

1) "the PC are just like most people in the real world" i.e. they will spend their gold to improve their lifestyles

2) "the PC are just unlike most people in the real world" i.e. they will not even bother with picking up treasure

The two ideas can coexist, i.e. some PC might be in the first group and others in the second, or the same PC might be of the first group when young and of the second when older. But then from 1) they would probably buy themselves a house/keep/castle, horses and wagons, clothes and accessories, and/or hire servants/guards/teachers/performers (some even intimate companions), and/or expend in travels, entertainments, celebrations, businesses, etc. Case 2) simply means the PCs are beyond the lure of wealth, and value being heroes, becoming rulers, saving the country/world/multiverse, or they value knowledge, honor, ideals etc. more than wealth.

Honestly the only thing that bored me already is the circular idea of investing treasure into adventuring equipment that will help you find more treasure to invest in equipment to find more treasure to invest in equipment to find more treasure...... Removing the necessity of this in the 5e game was really a good move IMO.
 

steeldragons

Steeliest of the dragons
Epic
Oh! This reminds me [duh. no posts without minimum 2 cups of coffee! Rookie mistake.]...STRONGHOLD! Castles, temples, hideouts, towers...Watchtower in orbit? Hall of [Heroes]? ...safe houses, vacation homes/summer estates, fox/bolt holes, etc... Construction and upkeep on a "home base(s)" is a nice, and constant, drain on ye olde income.
 

CapnZapp

Legend
I've seen people mentioning that they have excess gold in 5e, largely because magic items aren't generally available to purchase. So the question is, where are you going to spend all that cash?

...

Okay, what am I missing?

Aren't you trying to solve a problem that didn't need a new solution?

How about hoping the DMG contains magic item prices as an option for those of us who feel magic items that make your character better is the most fun option to spend your gold on.
 

Hereticus

First Post
Magic items are generally available for purchase. If they weren't common as dirt they wouldn't be all over the place in the hands of practically every group of 4 or more creatures.

I don't like to sell magic items to my characters often, or for them to find them as part of a treasure haul. They should fight the previous owner for them!
 

CapnZapp

Legend
Magic items are generally available for purchase. If they weren't common as dirt they wouldn't be all over the place in the hands of practically every group of 4 or more creatures.
Yes, 5th ed can't both eat the cake and have it too.

If magic swords are supposed to be invaluable then don't hand them out to level 1 characters like candy.

Conversely (and much preferred) accept the consequences of your own actions (=handing out magic loot is fun) and stop pretending there won't be a marked created around these items, WotC!!
 


Quartz

Hero
Magic items may not be available for purchase off the shelf, but shouldn't PCs be able to commission them? This also gives ideas for fetch quests, of course: "I'll be delighted to make this armour for you, Sir knight, but I need..."
 

Hereticus

First Post
Magic items may not be available for purchase off the shelf, but shouldn't PCs be able to commission them? This also gives ideas for fetch quests, of course: "I'll be delighted to make this armour for you, Sir knight, but I need..."

Yes they should. But as DM I would make them expensive to buy and time consuming to make. Characters should have stories about what they defeated, not where they shopped.
 

Chocolategravy

First Post
Yes, 5th ed can't both eat the cake and have it too.

If magic swords are supposed to be invaluable then don't hand them out to level 1 characters like candy.

Conversely (and much preferred) accept the consequences of your own actions (=handing out magic loot is fun) and stop pretending there won't be a marked created around these items, WotC!!

A problem which would have easily been solved with a decent crafting system. Of all the things they take from MMOs and shatter any RPG verisimilitude with, why don't they take a decent crafting system because that solves a lot of problems and doesn't break verisimilitude. Want to have magic armor, you need hide from X and scales from Y. Want a magic staff, gotta find a rare tree A and get beholder eye B and silver blessed by C.

This way it is MUCH easier to control magic item availability in your game. An encounter can but doesn't have to drop an entire magic item, it can drop a part of one. In the same way gold can be used to buy magic items or parts of magic items but availability of either is far more in the hands of the DM and feels far less artificial. It also greatly promotes PCs taking some initiative and going out and doing side quests.

Entirely as an option you can also add wear in to explain why magic items exit the world and don't accumulate. In 3E destroying items with sunder, disjunction or rolling 1 on a DEX save was relatively common at higher levels. A similar system for 5E could be entirely appropriate and meshes well with a crafting system.
 

Chocolategravy

First Post
Magic items may not be available for purchase off the shelf, but shouldn't PCs be able to commission them? This also gives ideas for fetch quests, of course: "I'll be delighted to make this armour for you, Sir knight, but I need..."

If a group of people with enough wealth to buy several kingdoms comes to town with a need for magic items, there will be people lining up to fill that need. In the case of that much wealth it will be rulers with entire armies who will annihilate every ruin, dungeon and cave in a 500 mile radius looking for things to get that wealth with.
 

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