D&D General Is power creep bad?

Is power creep, particularly in D&D, a bad thing?

  • More power is always better (or why steroids were good for baseball)

    Votes: 3 2.3%
  • Power creep is fun when you also boost the old content

    Votes: 34 26.2%
  • Meh, whatever

    Votes: 23 17.7%
  • I'd rather they stick to a base power level, but its still playable

    Votes: 36 27.7%
  • Sweet Mary, mother of God, why? (or why are there apples and cinnamon in my oatmeal?)

    Votes: 23 17.7%
  • Other, I'll explain.

    Votes: 11 8.5%

James Gasik

We don't talk about Pun-Pun
Because games initially start out fairly conservative. Improvements have more room to grow rather than shrink.
Yeah, it takes time to figure out what the appropriate power level of some things should be. I wouldn't mind adjustments as the game continues, the problem is this desire to keep the PHB "evergreen" so it's sacrilege to adjust almost anything in it- instead, let's make new things at adjusted power levels instead!
 

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As others have stated, some power creep is inevitable. I'm fine with power creep as long as it doesn't get out of control. The level of power creep in 5E is fine but starting to become more significant. They are probably wise to revise the edition before the power creep goes any further.

3.X? Now that was out of control.
 

Vaalingrade

Legend
Yeah, it takes time to figure out what the appropriate power level of some things should be. I wouldn't mind adjustments as the game continues, the problem is this desire to keep the PHB "evergreen" so it's sacrilege to adjust almost anything in it- instead, let's make new things at adjusted power levels instead!
They walked back every promise they ever made about 5e, so why keep this one?
 


James Gasik

We don't talk about Pun-Pun
They walked back every promise they ever made about 5e, so why keep this one?
Making people pay for errata, or constantly updating books so that they become less useful to own. WotC did a lot of the first in the 3.5 era (Complete Arcane and the Polymorph subschool, for example), and Paizo was horrible about the second (though 4e suffered from this as well). I remember buying the Advanced Class Guide, and half the book had errata before I even opened it!
 

James Gasik

We don't talk about Pun-Pun
Bring back permanent Level Drain!
I have to ask if you're serious, because for the life of me, I never understood the upside to level drain. Ok, you're now a level weaker. Which means you are less able to contribute to whatever part you're a member of- possibly forever!
 

DND_Reborn

The High Aldwin
I have to ask if you're serious, because for the life of me, I never understood the upside to level drain. Ok, you're now a level weaker. Which means you are less able to contribute to whatever part you're a member of- possibly forever!
Because it is absolutely terrifying! :D :devilish:

I agree with it, but find using levels of exhaustion work well for 5E (e.g. vampires deal two levels of exhaustion on a bite, etc.).
 

James Gasik

We don't talk about Pun-Pun
See I cut my teeth in AD&D when it took forever to gain a level, and when you encounter a creature that could level drain, there wasn't anything you could do about it- not getting hit isn't really an option (well, I mean, it is an option, if the DM is allowing parries and such, but the first time you realize your opponent is a vampire/wight/spectre/wraith you probably weren't prepared for it).

Losing because you failed a roll is rough. Losing because the DM succeeded at a roll? Blah.

I never used level draining monsters as a DM because it just felt unnecessarily cruel- killing the PC's is usually more merciful!
 


Reynard

Legend
Supporter
See I cut my teeth in AD&D when it took forever to gain a level, and when you encounter a creature that could level drain, there wasn't anything you could do about it- not getting hit isn't really an option (well, I mean, it is an option, if the DM is allowing parries and such, but the first time you realize your opponent is a vampire/wight/spectre/wraith you probably weren't prepared for it).

Losing because you failed a roll is rough. Losing because the DM succeeded at a roll? Blah.

I never used level draining monsters as a DM because it just felt unnecessarily cruel- killing the PC's is usually more merciful!
I would say that if you are trying to engage in a stand up fight with a level draining monster in AD&D, you are either very unlucky (got surprised by wights) or not really approaching them game the way it is meant to be played. I think folks often misinterpret why we have "weaker" monsters in 5E in regards to save or die, level drain and so on. it isn't because "5E is kids stuff or for dirty casuals" or any of that. it's because 5E is the MCU of D&D editions, designed to be full of bombastic action set pieces and peopled by larger than life heroes. Of course you don't want level drain in that game -- it's counter to the goal. But that doesn't mean it's "bad design" as people often accuse. It is just intended for a very different style of play.
 

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