• NOW LIVE! -- One-Page Adventures for D&D 5th Edition on Kickstarter! A booklet of colourful one-page adventures for D&D 5th Edition ranging from levels 1-9 and designed for a single session of play.
log in or register to remove this ad

 

Is The One Ring 2E Kickstarter going to break the records?

At over $140K in the first half hour and shooting quickly past the $200K mark before the first hour was up, the numbers on Free League's Kickstarter for the 2nd Edition of The One Ring are whizzing up faster than the eye can see!

d50bd7eebed917d3a7580064ed3758c7_original.jpg



The record for a TTRPG Kickstarter is Matt Colville, at over $2M for his Strongholds & Followers project (and a followup $1.3M campaign). The next highest was John Wick's 7th Sea at about $1.2M.

There were over 6,000 people who were following the pre-launch page for this Kickstarter, which runs for three weeks.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

CubicsRube

Adventurer
Supporter
As a rule of thumb, for what is worth from a non-project creator like me, a 30-days campaign seems a lot of wasted time, effort, and energy, if you've made enough of a marketing campaign before it. The long, silent middle part is only really useful to campaigns started with a low profile, i.e. the campaigns that need the time in-between to rise some real awareness on its existence.
That's it. I think running a project for any operation must be hugely time consuming with timely updates, responses to backers and keeping the hype up. Why not try 2 weeks out and see if those mid range orders will get picked up in late pledges anyway? Either way they probably save a lot of resources with 2 weeks less of running the projects that they can put elsewhere.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
That's it. I think running a project for any operation must be hugely time consuming with timely updates, responses to backers and keeping the hype up. Why not try 2 weeks out and see if those mid range orders will get picked up in late pledges anyway? Either way they probably save a lot of resources with 2 weeks less of running the projects that they can put elsewhere.
It’s a full time job. And like you say that flat period in the middle it looks like they get picked up anyway. But we’re still at the point that we’re learning about that through experimentation. There’s the zine thing every year, people experimenting with one week kickstarters, I’m doing two 2-week campaigns every six weeks, and so on. Give it another year, and it’ll all shake out.

Of course it also depends on the size of the Kickstarter and balancing the cost of full time promotion of the campaign for those middle weeks against the amount you make each day. Return on Investment, as they say.
 

Staffan

Adventurer
Then why not 2 months? Why not 6? A year? What’s so magical about 30 days, specifically?*



*the answer is nothing as we creators are starting to discover
One month means anyone who gets paid monthly will get at least one paycheck during the course of the kickstarter and can put some money away for it, if they have the means.

Of course, this matters more if we're talking a big-money kickstarter where you have $100 or $200 pledges than "65 enchanted trinkets" for $10-15.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
One month means anyone who gets paid monthly will get at least one paycheck during the course of the kickstarter and can put some money away for it, if they have the means.
That is one consideration, yep, and a common theory. It’s why mine used to be 32 days. But I’m discovering the hard way (i.e. by doing it) that that doesn’t really make much of a difference.
 

schneeland

Explorer
One of the things to consider is that Kickstarter ends up on credit cards, so the pay cheque has less of an effect.
Also, a thing that's relatively new IMO is the longer pre-launch phases, where hype is already built up and people get notified immediately on launch (plus, once you have backed a few campaigns, there's really no way you are going to miss that a new thing started ;)).

All in all: considering how typical campaigns go, I'm not surprised that people start going for shorter ones. In fact, as a frequent backer of crowdfunding projects, I also start to prefer shorter ones (long ones are often kind of dull in the middle).
 

Staffan

Adventurer
That is one consideration, yep, and a common theory. It’s why mine used to be 32 days. But I’m discovering the hard way (i.e. by doing it) that that doesn’t really make much of a difference.
I made an edit to my post while you were replying. You use Kickstarter a bit differently from many others, and that clearly works for you. And sure, when the product being sold is a $7 PDF/$20 softcover, you probably don't need to make sure customers are getting paid while the crowdfunding is going on. But when we're talking something like Frosthaven, which costs $100 or $145 with extras, that might be more relevant.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
I made an edit to my post while you were replying. You use Kickstarter a bit differently from many others, and that clearly works for you. And sure, when the product being sold is a $7 PDF/$20 softcover, you probably don't need to make sure customers are getting paid while the crowdfunding is going on. But when we're talking something like Frosthaven, which costs $100 or $145 with extras, that might be more relevant.
I’ve used Kickstarters in lots of ways, from small mini quickstarters which make £10-15K every two weeks to big hardcover month-long Judge Dredd licensed RPGs which made $200K-ish, and various things in-between which made between £30K-£200K, such as Mythological Figures & Maleficent Monsters (month-long, $170k).

I continue to experiment and push the boundaries of Kickstarter usage, although Awfully Cheerful Engine and Level Up will be traditional big month-long campaigns, with the quickstarters filling the rest of the year.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
... unless you're Disney and can bribe enough congressmembers to extend copyright indefinitely that way when Steamboat Willie gets close to becoming public domain. Should be about time for another extension now.
They actually didn’t fight for an extension recently, though I don’t recall what character exactly it was that is/will soon be public domain as a result.

But we can bet they will when Mickey himself or another high profile name comes up.
 

CubicsRube

Adventurer
Supporter
One month means anyone who gets paid monthly will get at least one paycheck during the course of the kickstarter and can put some money away for it, if they have the means.

Of course, this matters more if we're talking a big-money kickstarter where you have $100 or $200 pledges than "65 enchanted trinkets" for $10-15.
Usually you can put down $1 and pick it up in the pledge manager, or late pledge
 



cbwjm

Hero
I thought the 1st edition had only been released a couple years back, turns out it was 2011. I recall spending time watching the strongholds and followers kickstarter to see the money keep ticking up. It was pretty crazy.
 

TheAlkaizer

Game Designer
That's it. I think running a project for any operation must be hugely time consuming with timely updates, responses to backers and keeping the hype up. Why not try 2 weeks out and see if those mid range orders will get picked up in late pledges anyway? Either way they probably save a lot of resources with 2 weeks less of running the projects that they can put elsewhere.
One thing to consider; I've worked on a few successful kickstarters (nothing related to TTRPGs) and as you mentioned there's a flat part in the middle and a boom at the start and of the campaign. The one at the start is easily understandable. However, the boom at the end is mostly people that trickled in through that middle part and did not pull the trigger, only to receive a notification that the campaign will end. We've seemed to be able to make some correlation between our numbers in the middle part of a campaign and the boom at the end.

No ideas if it's different with the demographic of TTRPGs though.
 

dalisprime

Explorer
Not all Kickstarters use pledge managers. I don't. And I don't allow late pledges, because I think that's disrespectful to the people who supported the campaign.
This honestly baffles me. The mentality of 'i backed it while it ran, so only I deserve it, anything else is disrespectful'. It is elitist and the worst form of entitlement.
Commercially it makes zero sense to cut off late pledges since they offer others the opportunity to invest in your product.
As a backer of multiple projects, not once was I bothered by the prospect that someone may put down a dollar to secure their pledge and I never understood the people who were bothered. If it gives the creator more money to work with - all the better, everyone is a winner in that case.
 

TheSword

Legend
Supporter
It’s about to beat all the 7,000,000 SEK second set of stretch goals which is cool. I liked what they put in that second set.
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
This honestly baffles me. The mentality of 'i backed it while it ran, so only I deserve it, anything else is disrespectful'. It is elitist and the worst form of entitlement.
Commercially it makes zero sense to cut off late pledges since they offer others the opportunity to invest in your product.
There are many forms of entitlement in this world. I'm pretty sure this isn't the worst form! Calm down. :)

The other aspect is that we've built a reputation over years for fulfilling Kickstarters immediately, and then we move on to the next knowing that nothing is outstanding (which is why we also shy away from stretch goals). There's only a gap of a week in between them, so we find it better for us that we tidy each away as we go.

Different people use Kickstarter in different ways, and people are experimenting more and more with the format and platform as time goes on.
 



Staffan

Adventurer
This honestly baffles me. The mentality of 'i backed it while it ran, so only I deserve it, anything else is disrespectful'. It is elitist and the worst form of entitlement.
Commercially it makes zero sense to cut off late pledges since they offer others the opportunity to invest in your product.
It depends, I think. If you offer a product on Kickstarter and say "This'll cost $150 once the Kickstarter is done, but if you support us here you'll get it for $100", and then keep selling it for $100 once the Kickstarter is done, that could be considered false marketing. The situation is, of course, entirely different if that sort of thing has been stated ahead of time ("You can also pay $1 now and get into the pledge manager where you can pay more to get the pledge level you want").
 

I ran one campaign of TOR 1E and actually helped playtest the rules (back when that was done on forums of all things).

There were some rule elements I did not like. Combat was a little too static and I felt that the roleplaying encounter jumped into the deep end too quick with brand new characters talking to kings.

Both of these rule elements got an overhaul in 2E and I'm maybe in the minority in thinking this was needed. I hope I like the changes and improvements.

2E is supposed to use more unified mechanics as well, which I think will be a big leap forward. I do like the dice pool and d12 die and I'm glad that has been kept.

What I did like was the magic and excitement, as you mention. Because TOR really is a hex crawl your character feels very small in a very big world. You really feel like you're walking leagues in Middle Earth with a backpack and sore feet. It was wonderful.

I like the no spells. The people of Middle Earth had magical abilities but PCs didn't play wizards. I like this element and it is being enhanced in 2E. More special abilities based on who you are and where you are from.

The growing Shadow was also powerful. You could feel Sauron slowly becoming more and more aware of your fellowship. And you felt the weight and pull of your worst impulses and you could give in to them as Boromir did. The world was beautiful but a darkness was growing not only in the world but also in your PC's heart.

The adventures were great. The locations were great. The NPCs were great. The feel was very Middle Earth.

2E is also bringing in landmarks--small pockets of legendary adventure sites. This will pair nicely with the longer adventures of 1E.

I like the 2E art better. Less shiny and clean.

We are also getting the Shire. And get to play secondary characters from the books.

Also, Moria is coming.

So, yeah, I'm all in for a second edition.
Sounds great! Thanks for the detailed overview of what makes it special. Close to pulling the trigger.
 

Visit Our Sponsor

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top