5E Jumping

werecorpse

Explorer
How does a 15 strength character jump a 16' gap?

or a 20' gap?

do they land prone?

does it matter if they have extra movement ? Or are slower? Or small?

what are the mechanics for long jumping or high jumping?
 

Paraxis

Villager
JUMPING Your Strength determines how far you can jump.

Long Jump. When you make a long jump, you cover a number of feet up to your Strength score if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump. When you make a standing long jump, you can leap only half that distance. Either way, each foot you clear on the jump costs a foot of movement.

This rule assumes that the height of your jump doesn’t matter, such as a jump across a stream or chasm. At your DM’s option, you must succeed on a DC 10 Strength (Athletics) check to clear a low obstacle (no taller than a quarter of the jump’s distance), such as a hedge or low wall. Otherwise, you hit it.

When you land in difficult terrain, you must succeed on a DC 10 Dexterity (Acrobatics) check to land on your feet. Otherwise, you land prone.

High Jump. When you make a high jump, you leap into the air a number of feet equal to 3 + your Strength modifier if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump. When you make a standing high jump, you can jump only half that distance. Either way, each foot you clear on the jump costs a foot of movement. In some circumstances, your DM might allow you to make a Strength (Athletics) check to jump higher than you normally can.

You can extend your arms half your height above yourself during the jump. Thus, you can reach above you a distance equal to the height of the jump plus 1. times your height.

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Athletics. Your Strength (Athletics) check covers difficult situations you encounter while climbing, jumping, or swimming. Examples include the following activities:

-You try to jump an unusually long distance or pull off a stunt midjump.

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The above are the specific rules for jumping, anything else is up to the DM.

The way I handle a strength 15 character making a long jump of of 16' or 20', is by making them make a Strength(athletics) check as it states. DC varies by situation but a 15 will get you a few extra feet at my table. I also allow the extension of arms like with a high jump on a long jump so the 16' gap would be withing reach just clinging to the side.

I take extra movement, height, size and stuff into adjudicating the above DC for extra distance covered.

Landing in difficult terrain as above is a DC 10 Dexterity(acrobatics) check to land not prone.

But if the character has the strength and the 10 feet of room for a jump a strength 15 halfling makes a 15' jump without a check, because that is what the rules say happens. Pretty much 10' wide pits in the hall don't matter much unless someone dumped strength to less than 10.
 
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Syntallah

Villager
I allow a jumper to extend his base norm by 20% per 5pts of an Athletics check.

So, a PC with 20 Str and +6 proficiency who rolled a 20 on his die could jump 44ft. Quite a bit beyond the Olympic records, but hey, it's epic fantasy.
 

iserith

Magic Wordsmith
How does a 15 strength character jump a 16' gap?

or a 20' gap?

do they land prone?

does it matter if they have extra movement ? Or are slower? Or small?

what are the mechanics for long jumping or high jumping?
A DM may say that such a character fails to jump a 16-foot gap. Or the DM may say the result is uncertain and call for an ability check. He or she may also say the jump succeeds, but on its own and with reference to rules only, this doesn't seem a likely call.

A DM may be likely to rule landing prone as a result of failure on a check, such as by landing in difficult terrain or trying to extend a jump past the character's Strength score. I think a good failure condition that is exciting and memorable would be to have the character just barely miss the jump and catch the ledge with his or her hands (prone, mechanically). Now the character is dangling there, possibly having dropped weapons and shield - "What do you do?"

According to the rules, the only factor in jump distance is Strength score (or Strength modifier for high jumps). So extra movement or size doesn't make a difference except perhaps when the DM considers those as factors for determining a DC when the character takes an action with an uncertain outcome. Reduced movement may impact the overall distance a character can jump, depending on the circumstances. For example, a halfling with Strength 15 under the effects of a ray of frost may struggle to jump that gap after making an attack as he or she only has 15 feet of movement to spare and 10 feet of movement is required to make a running long jump. Still, the DM may only consider their jump uncertain (and apply a higher DC due to the circumstances) rather than say the character cannot make the jump outright.

The rules for jumping are on page 64 of the Basic Rules which are available online for free.
 

Pibby

Villager
I personally do not like the simulationist rules of jumping and never had. Despite that, they do make a good guideline.
Whenever a PC asks me how difficult it is to make a particular jump I express the DC based on how hard I want it to be, not how hard it actually is as expressed by the book. Doing so I also take note every time I do this so that the DC is the same when a similar situation comes up. For things like the Monk class features, I just give a flat bonus to jump checks (up to +5) when appropriate because Advantage would "stack" with the normal rules for such things.
 

KarinsDad

Villager
I allow a jumper to extend his base norm by 20% per 5pts of an Athletics check.

So, a PC with 20 Str and +6 proficiency who rolled a 20 on his die could jump 44ft. Quite a bit beyond the Olympic records, but hey, it's epic fantasy.
With armor and backpack and such, that's not just beyond the roughly 29 1/3 foot Olympic record, it grabs the Olympic record, beats it up, stumps on it and then takes a leak on it (I do not even know how you got to 44 there, a normal jump is strength 20 add your houserule of +20% of 31 athletics check would be 6, for 26 total). :lol:
 

Wolfskin

Villager
Recently I had to come up with a house rule on the fly for this: when you want to clear a distance longer than your ability score in a jump, you make an Athletics check at DC 10 and clear an extra foot for each number over the check's difficulty.
 

Syntallah

Villager
With armor and backpack and such, that's not just beyond the roughly 29 1/3 foot Olympic record, it grabs the Olympic record, beats it up, stumps on it and then takes a leak on it (I do not even know how you got to 44 there, a normal jump is strength 20 add your houserule of +20% of 31 athletics check would be 6, for 26 total). :lol:
Apologies, was away from my DM Screen and the ole memory ain't what it used to be. The modifier is 15% (not 20%), per 5pts of the Athletics check.

So, if you get a 31 on your check [20 roll + 5 Str mod + 6 prof bonus], divided by 5 is six increments of 15%; total of [.9 * your 20 Str score] for 18ft added to your baseline of 20ft. Grand total of 38ft. Still smashing records, but that's a 20th level PC rolling perfectly...

As for the gear mention, I use the variant encumbrance rules, and keep track of what the PCs are carrying. If the plate wearing, backpack carrying fighter wants to jump a chasm, I will alter the 5pt/15% modifier on a case by case basis. Throw in the Disadvantage from encumbrance, and things can get real tricky real quick.
 

KarinsDad

Villager
Apologies, was away from my DM Screen and the ole memory ain't what it used to be. The modifier is 15% (not 20%), per 5pts of the Athletics check.

So, if you get a 31 on your check [20 roll + 5 Str mod + 6 prof bonus], divided by 5 is six increments of 15%; total of [.9 * your 20 Str score] for 18ft added to your baseline of 20ft. Grand total of 38ft. Still smashing records, but that's a 20th level PC rolling perfectly...

As for the gear mention, I use the variant encumbrance rules, and keep track of what the PCs are carrying. If the plate wearing, backpack carrying fighter wants to jump a chasm, I will alter the 5pt/15% modifier on a case by case basis. Throw in the Disadvantage from encumbrance, and things can get real tricky real quick.
Actually, I really like the concept of your house rule, but I would simplify it a bit.

Strength plus Athletic check / 5 (normal round down). First level PC with 8 Strength and no Athletics? 8 feet to 11 feet (20 becomes a 19 with a -1 modifier). First level PC with 16 Strength and Athletics? 17 feet to 21 feet. 17th level PC with 20 Strength and Athletics? 22 feet to 26 feet. Much better than the 8 to 20 feet of the normal rules. And by squeezing the roll like this, it's not a situation of jumping 15 feet one round and jumping 28 feet the next. Except for a 8 or 9 Str PC, there's always a difference of 4 feet between best and worse jump (which makes sense, although we do use the DMG optional rule of 1 something bad can happen, 20 something good can happen for checks and saves).

Btw, in my game, things that PCs have to jump over are not increments of 5 foot like the 4E grid system. A chasm can be 6 feet, 9 feet, 11 feet, whatever depending. So, every +1 can help. Also, my rooms are not always 10x20 rooms. Lots of times they are 8x21 or 17x18 or any other dimensions, often weird blob shaped caverns of whatever size.
 
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Syntallah

Villager
Actually, I really like the concept of your house rule, but I would simplify it a bit.

Strength plus Athletic check / 5 (normal round down). First level PC with 8 Strength and no Athletics? 8 feet to 11 feet (20 becomes a 19 with a -1 modifier). First level PC with 16 Strength and Athletics? 17 feet to 21 feet. 17th level PC with 20 Strength and Athletics? 22 feet to 26 feet. Much better than the 8 to 20 feet of the normal rules. And by squeezing the roll like this, it's not a situation of jumping 15 feet one round and jumping 28 feet the next. Except for a 8 or 9 Str PC, there's always a difference of 4 feet between best and worse jump (which makes sense, although we do use the DMG optional rule of 1 something bad can happen, 20 something good can happen for checks and saves).

Btw, in my game, things that PCs have to jump over are not increments of 5 foot like the 4E grid system. A chasm can be 6 feet, 9 feet, 11 feet, whatever depending. So, every +1 can help. Also, my rooms are not always 10x20 rooms. Lots of times they are 8x21 or 17x18 or any other dimensions, often weird blob shaped caverns of whatever size.
Hey, that's pretty good. I have always felt that stats should mean something outside of a 'bonus in combat', and I really like the more consistent jump range. I will definitely give this a whirl..!
 

jgsugden

Explorer
Too much thinking, not enough action.

There is no roll required to make a jump equal to your strength if you get your running start. If you want to jump a bit farther than that, the DM should set a DC for an athletics check. It should be done on the fly and shouldn't allow the jumping distance to grow dramatically - by no more than 5 feet. However, I'd tell people to subtract their strength modifier from their athletics check - they're already getting the benefit of their strength in the base distance they can leap. It should not be double counted. Only count proficiency and the benefits of advantage.
 

neobolts

Explorer
Too much thinking, not enough action.

There is no roll required to make a jump equal to your strength if you get your running start. If you want to jump a bit farther than that, the DM should set a DC for an athletics check. It should be done on the fly and shouldn't allow the jumping distance to grow dramatically - by no more than 5 feet. However, I'd tell people to subtract their strength modifier from their athletics check - they're already getting the benefit of their strength in the base distance they can leap. It should not be double counted. Only count proficiency and the benefits of advantage.
In terms of setting the DC, I might go with a simple athletics DC of 10+(number of feet beyond PC's passive jump distance). So a PC that covers 15 feet without a roll...needs to roll a 12 to make it 17 feet). I wouldn't cap what they can attempt at +5 ft, just let the rising difficulty speak for itself.
 
However, I'd tell people to subtract their strength modifier from their athletics check - they're already getting the benefit of their strength in the base distance they can leap. It should not be double counted. Only count proficiency and the benefits of advantage.
Excellent catch.
 
How does a 15 strength character jump a 16' gap?

or a 20' gap?
I'd say they get a running leap and then catch the edge if their hands are free, they then climb up their (height x1.5) provided they have remaining speed.


Really It's up to the DM, but I recommend not being generous as the jumping rules themselves are quite generous to start with.

do they land prone?
Hanging on the ledge I say.
 

Rod Staffwand

aka Ermlaspur Flormbator
Jumping not too far is automatic. Jumping pretty far requires a check of some kind. Jumping really really far is impossible. I hope this helps.
 

Tormyr

Adventurer
So what about setting the DC at the distance to be jumped? for a 20' gap with a 10' run the DC would be 20. The d20 rolls needed for various characters would be:
Str 10 no athletics: needs a 20
Str 10 +2 athletics: needs a 18
Str 8 no athletics: needs a nat 20 or don't allow the roll
Str 16 +2 athletics: needs a 15
Str 18 +3 athletics: needs a 13

For a 15 foot gap DC 15
Str 8 no athletics: needs a 16
Str 12 +6 athletics: needs an 8

for a 25 foot gap DC 25
Str 8 no athletics: nat 20
Str 16 no athletics: nat 20
Str 8 +6 athletics: nat 20
Str 16 +3 athletics needs a 19
Str 20 +6 athletics needs a 14

for a 30 foot gap DC 30
Str 20 +6 athletics: needs a 19

Setting the DC equal to the distance seems to keep the difficulty suitably high while still attainable for those that invest in strength or athletics. It also leaves the 30 foot jump firmly in Olympic world record territory since only the character with the maxed out stats can attain it. If a DM does not want someone without maxed out stats to get 30 feet, just don't allow a roll.

EDIT: A DM could also throw an equal Dexterity (Acrobatics) check on the other end of any successful jump. So the character successfully making the 30 foot jump needs a DC30 Dexterity (Acrobatics) check to land on their feet on the other side.
 
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