Dragonlance Lunar Sorcery: A Preview from Shadow of the Dragon Queen

WotC has posted a preview from the upcoming Shadow of the Dragon Queen on D&D Beyond, diving into the Lunary Sorcery subclass.

lunar-socerer-featured.jpg


Traditionally magic in Krynn has been represented by the Wizards of High Sorcery, who owe their allegiance to one of the black, red, or white moons (and gods) of magic. Sorcerers weren't around in D&D when Dragonlance was created.

Lunar Sorcerers also draw power from the moons, based on the moon's phase (Full, New, Crescent). You choose the phase each day (though at later levels you can do so more often). The subclass gets a lot of spells (15 additional spells!)


 
Last edited:

log in or register to remove this ad


log in or register to remove this ad


cbwjm

Seb-wejem
And the whole thing was they were bad at it! They built giant contraptions that were needlessly complicated but somehow worked unintentionally.

Thinker gnomes on the other hand…
I can't remember if it was game mechanics or if it was one of the various short stories, but I remember reading something about mad gnomes. Their contraptions actually worked and at 1/3 the size.
 


Here the relevant part

But wait, you say, some of this stuff could be useful! From what I can glean from the tinkering rules, if you have a useful item, you have cheated or done something wrong. Let's look at the Netflinger, That price of 312 stl, that would get you 15 heavy crossbows, or cover more than 3/4 the cost of a suit of plate armor. But it hits automatically and will entangle any creature with 8 or fewer Hit Dice for 3 rounds, with a range of 32 feet. I found a red dragon in AD&D ranged from 9-11 HD, so it stands to reason this could work on other dragons, at least on the lower HD side (you'd think a hatchling would be different sized than a full grown adult, but dragons worked a little differently, they kept the same number of HD, and had 1 HP per die per age category, ranging 1-8).

Hits automatically, if it works correctly. The netflinger is a complexity 8 item (ranging 1-18). According to the character, it works successfully on a d20 roll of 18+ (even at complexity 1 success is only on a 16+)(success does give a +1 on next roll, so luck might be with you). It has an unpredictable result on a 10-17, which sends you to the Gnome Mishap table, a d20 roll which is also used when building a new item, so some of the results (needs another part) make less sense here. Other effects might be an unexpected glow (blinding the operator and anyone nearby), unbearable temperature change, or even an explosion. "interpret the results as humorously as the situation allows." 9 or less it fails, which means it breaks. A gnome whose level is at least the complexity level of the device can repair it after two hours times the complexity level (so 16 hours for the netflinger). You'll also be -1 on future rolls.

How bad is this chart? As I said, a complexity 1, up to complexity 3, needs only a 16 or above to succeed. 25% chance of success, awesome. But as you go up in complexity, the range of unpredictable goes up. Complexity 1 is unpredictable on a 15, and fails on a 14 or less. Complexity 2, it's unpredictable on a 14-15, fails on a 13 or less. With the random results from unpredictable, maybe it's preferable to have it break. On the other extreme, complexity 18 will only work on a 20+, fails on a 2 or less, and is unpredictable the rest of the time.

I'm sure the gnomes got some laughs at the table of the original Dragonlance game, but they should never have gone beyond that.
 


Why would they aim to shrink the modern game to fit into a setting rather than adapting the setting to the modern game?

You say "shrink" I say "tailor"

Bespoke rules for settings make settings unique and the experience of playing in them special.

The Forgotten Realms is the Cheese Cake Factory of settings. That's great for it. But Krynn can be that local mom and pop Italian spot that focuses on its own things and doesn't need a burger, a burrito, and Kung Pow chicken on the menu.
 

Faolyn

(she/her)
And they definitely have some kind of magic. How else would they get up into Spelljammer and create Autognomes?
Perhaps even more importantly: how could they get everything to fail so spectacularly but without killing them all off en masse without it being at least a bit magical. If it were purely scientific tinkering, they'd probably have all died from boilers exploding or roofs collapsing or noxious gases.
 

vecna00

Speculation Specialist Wizard
You say "shrink" I say "tailor"

Bespoke rules for settings make settings unique and the experience of playing in them special.

The Forgotten Realms is the Cheese Cake Factory of settings. That's great for it. But Krynn can be that local mom and pop Italian spot that focuses on its own things and doesn't need a burger, a burrito, and Kung Pow chicken on the menu.
Then make your game that way.
 

I can't remember if it was game mechanics or if it was one of the various short stories, but I remember reading something about mad gnomes. Their contraptions actually worked and at 1/3 the size.
Mad gnomes = thinker gnomes, who can actually build things that work as intended. Introduced in Taladas and reappearing in 5th age material
 

Remove ads

Remove ads

AD6_gamerati_skyscraper

Remove ads

Recent & Upcoming Releases

Top