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Missing Rules

[MENTION=6787503]Hriston[/MENTION], I'd thought about "mentioning" you into this thread, so I'm glad that you found it on your own!

I don't set DCs based on the abilities of the character. If a situation includes a gap to be jumped, for example, that's unusually far for some characters such that they need to make a STR (Athletics) check to clear the span, the DC would be the same for each person making the attempt.

I see the designations, easy, medium, hard, etc., to refer to the difficulty for the average person, not the difficulty for the individual making the check.
DCs appear to be intended to be objective, not subjective. That seemed to mean focus on the jump distance, not the jumper. When I do that, it feels easy to reach a consistent ruling.

<snip>

players have all kinds of resources to bear on this, that can make a high DC doable, or circumvent it all together (cast Fly?) That makes scaling subjectively for me a questionable pursuit, but if I did scale, I'd scale percentually.
My intuition is closer to [MENTION=6919838]5ekyu[/MENTION] and [MENTION=6802765]Xetheral[/MENTION] - the DC is objective in the sense of relfective of the pre-established ingame difficulty (which constrasts with some other sytems, including some aspects of 4e) but the character's STR is part of that pre-estabished ingame difficulty. That is, if a character can certainly jump 15' (STR 15) then it seems that s/he can probably jump 16' about as easily as someone who can certainly jump 12' (STR 12) can jump 13' or 14'. But a DC = distance approach will tend to exaggerate things in favour of the weaker character.

I don't think I would personally use a formula, but just the standard DCs - jumping an extra foot for that 15 STR PC is probably easy (DC 10, so better than 50% chance of succes), while jumping an extra 4' for that 12 STR PC seems Medium or even Hard (so DC 15 or 20, ie quite a bit less than 50% chance of success without solid Athletics proficiency).

Another consideration (harking back to the Thief-Acrobat jumping abilities in Unearthed Arcana) is whether the character lands standing, or prone and hence needing to recover.

To comment on the "rulings/rules" aspect of the thread: I don't see any intention in 5e that certain rules are not to be followed -like the rule that uncertainy is resolved via checks, and that checks consist in rolling a d20 and adding mods from a fairly standard list. A GM could - for some sense of "could" - call for a Burning Wheel "die of fate" check to find out what happens when a PC jumps, or use the Moldvay Basic approach of setting a percentage chance of success and calling for a d% roll - but I don't see the least suggestion in the Basic PDF that this is what the game expects.
[MENTION=71699]clearstream[/MENTION] has mentioned the idea of (certain) rules being constitutive of a game - for D&D it's tempting to see d20 rolls to hit, doing polyhedral dice hit points of damage on a success; d20 rolls to save; and, in 5e, d20 checks to resolve action declarations with uncertain outcomes, as constitutive in that sense. A few departures from this are neither here nor there, but systematic departure would make it unclear in what sense the game is a 5e D&D one. (And that's before we get to the rather specific and intricate PC build rules, which play a constitutive role in themselves, and which don't contribute meaningfully to play if the constitutive action resolution rules aren't generally used.)
 
At first level 16 str and athletics proficiency (+5 total) means you guaranteed success is only 6 feet, the minimum score. Boots of striding triple the score as usual, and are much more valuable under my system.
I'm not terribly strong, not an especially great sprinter, and am a middle-aged white collar worker, and I think I can routinely jump 6' with a running start. This rule seems a bit punishing to me.

You shouldn't be able to guarantee an 18' jump either because you are strong with an 18 Str. With encumbrance rules (which almost no one uses) you are better off grabbing another PC and making the jump with them automatically if that's the case. A goliath with 20 strength and his large build trait could probably jump with 3-5 PC's and be guaranteed success using PHB, that just makes no sense.
I dunno, to me it seems kind of awesome. A goliath PC having the schtick of carrying his/her smaller friends over chasms seems pretty fun to me. It doesn't seem overpowered - playing a 20 STR goliath should feel a bit like playing The Hulk!
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
I am saying that just because a DM can overrule a rule, that does not prevent that rule being equal to the ruling. What do I mean by equal? I mean - equal in enabling a group to play D&D. I am contrasting that with a putative hierarchy of rulings (superior) over rules (inferior), which I think could imply that rulings are more important than rules in enabling a group to play D&D.
Okay. I can agree that they are equal in allowing the game to be played. There is still somewhat of a hierarchy, though. While rules and rulings are equal in allowing the game to be played, rulings are superior in allowing a group to play the game that they want to play. While I'm sure that there are groups out there who play strictly by the rules with no changes, I've never personally encountered one. Every group I've played in has had at least a few house rules, and some like mine have many. That's where I am coming from, and I think where the designers are coming from. The designers even mentioned that rulings over rules in D&D was about making the game your own. In that regard, rules are absolutely inferior to rulings.

That is a super-short summary. It is why I think rules must be on equal footing with rulings, even if a DM can overrule them. D&D rules enable a group to play D&D. Rulings tailor the rules to a group's preferences and fill in where the rules do not cover some eventuality. The designers, in their comments, acknowledge and endorse both of those activities - tailoring to preferences, covering eventualities. If by "inferior" you mean only that the rules are subject to tailoring and filling in. Then I agree with that. I just wouldn't use the label inferior because to me it does a poor job of explaining what is happening. The designers don't rank rules inferior to rulings, in my sense.
Heh. I responded to the first portion before I finished reading. Sounds like we are mostly in agreement, then.
 

Hriston

Explorer
I agree that DCs should be universal in general, but I make exceptions when the nature of the task is inherently relative. The DC to squeeze through a space, for example, is going to depend on the size of the creature in question compared to the size of the space. If the creature is small enough compared to the size of the space, I'd rule the task is so easy that there is no risk of failure. If the creature is large enough compared to the size of the space, I'd rule the task is impossible. In between, I'd set the DC in such a case relative to the size of the creature. Doing so permits the chance of success for any particular creature to go smoothly from 100% to 0% as the size of the space decreases, without any sudden discontinuities.

I treat jumping the same way, except that the rules already tell me how far a creature can jump so easily that there is no risk of failure, so I don't have to decide. Beyond that distance, I'd set a DC relative to how much additional distance (in absolute rather than relative terms, see below) the character needs. If the additional distance is large enough, I'd rule that the task is impossible. Again, for any particular character, I get a smoothly decreasing chance of success from 100% to 0% as the distance to be jumped increases.

There is an additional complication for jumping because the Strength score of the character is a factor both in determining the additional distance the character needs, and also a factor in the character's likelihood of succeeding the resulting check. This results in high-strength characters being more likely than low-strength characters to jump (e.g.) 1 extra foot, and I'm fine with that, because it makes sense realistically. (I set DCs based on absolute extra distance rather than proportional extra distance because of this complicating factor where strength is already on both sides of the equation.)
[MENTION=6787503]Hriston[/MENTION], I'd thought about "mentioning" you into this thread, so I'm glad that you found it on your own!


My intuition is closer to [MENTION=6919838]5ekyu[/MENTION] and [MENTION=6802765]Xetheral[/MENTION] - the DC is objective in the sense of relfective of the pre-established ingame difficulty (which constrasts with some other sytems, including some aspects of 4e) but the character's STR is part of that pre-estabished ingame difficulty. That is, if a character can certainly jump 15' (STR 15) then it seems that s/he can probably jump 16' about as easily as someone who can certainly jump 12' (STR 12) can jump 13' or 14'. But a DC = distance approach will tend to exaggerate things in favour of the weaker character.

I don't think I would personally use a formula, but just the standard DCs - jumping an extra foot for that 15 STR PC is probably easy (DC 10, so better than 50% chance of succes), while jumping an extra 4' for that 12 STR PC seems Medium or even Hard (so DC 15 or 20, ie quite a bit less than 50% chance of success without solid Athletics proficiency).

Another consideration (harking back to the Thief-Acrobat jumping abilities in Unearthed Arcana) is whether the character lands standing, or prone and hence needing to recover.
This is all fairly convincing, in light of which I’d use the following set of DCs, based on the probability of a 0th level, STR 16 character with Athletics proficiency hitting a DC 25, and current records for various jumps:
DCrunning horizontal jumpstanding horizontal jumprunning vertical jumpstanding vertical jump
103 feet1 foot6 inches3 inches
156 feet2 feet1 foot6 inches
209 feet3 feet1 foot 6 inches9 inches
2512 feet4 feet2 feet1 foot
3015 feet5 feet2 feet 6 inches1 foot 3 inches
Distances given are in addition to normal jump distance.

Strangely, the Basic Rules describe a vertical jump, while, in the case of a run-up, the numbers given are closer to a high jump. For a standing vertical jump, though, the heights seem to match NFL combine vertical jump records.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
This is all fairly convincing, in light of which I’d use the following set of DCs, based on the probability of a 0th level, STR 16 character with Athletics proficiency hitting a DC 25, and current records for various jumps:
DCrunning horizontal jumpstanding horizontal jumprunning vertical jumpstanding vertical jump
103 feet1 foot6 inches3 inches
156 feet2 feet1 foot6 inches
209 feet3 feet1 foot 6 inches9 inches
2512 feet4 feet2 feet1 foot
3015 feet5 feet2 feet 6 inches1 foot 3 inches
Distances given are in addition to normal jump distance.

Strangely, the Basic Rules describe a vertical jump, while, in the case of a run-up, the numbers given are closer to a high jump. For a standing vertical jump, though, the heights seem to match NFL combine vertical jump records.
This is a fantasy roleplaying game. Go with NBA vertical jump records.

Who Has The Highest Vertical Jump in NBA History?
Wilt Chamberlain – 48″ Wilt 'the Stilt' Chamberlain was one of the most dominant forces in NBA history. ...
Darrell Griffith – 48″
Michael Jordan – 46″ ...
Zach LaVine – 46″ ...
Jason Richardson – 46″
James White – 46″
Spud Webb – 46″ ...
Shannon Brown – 44.5″

I also think a DC 10 for a running 3 foot jump is really, really high. A natural walking pace is 2.5 feet in length. Do you really think it will be a DC 10 to go 6 inches further with a running start? I'm 48 and out of shape, and I can do it 100% of the time. I could probably even go 6 feet more reliably than a DC 10 would allow for.
 

Hriston

Explorer
This is a fantasy roleplaying game. Go with NBA vertical jump records.

Who Has The Highest Vertical Jump in NBA History?
Wilt Chamberlain – 48″ Wilt 'the Stilt' Chamberlain was one of the most dominant forces in NBA history. ...
Darrell Griffith – 48″
Michael Jordan – 46″ ...
Zach LaVine – 46″ ...
Jason Richardson – 46″
James White – 46″
Spud Webb – 46″ ...
Shannon Brown – 44.5″
Those are vertical jumps with a run-up. The NFL combine vertical jumps are from a standing position and are higher than the standing vertical jumps of the NBA draft because American football players have more explosive power. The NFL combine record for a vertical jump, for example, is 46”, whereas the highest in the NBA draft is 38”. If the NFL combine recorded running vertical jumps they’d probably be in the 50 to 54” range. The D&D distances for running vertical jumps are so out of whack, however, I just went with those.

I also think a DC 10 for a running 3 foot jump is really, really high. A natural walking pace is 2.5 feet in length. Do you really think it will be a DC 10 to go 6 inches further with a running start? I'm 48 and out of shape, and I can do it 100% of the time. I could probably even go 6 feet more reliably than a DC 10 would allow for.
I think you missed it where I said the distances given in the chart are in addition to a character’s normal jump distance based on their Strength.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
Those are vertical jumps with a run-up. The NFL combine vertical jumps are from a standing position and are higher than the standing vertical jumps of the NBA draft because American football players have more explosive power. The NFL combine record for a vertical jump, for example, is 46”, whereas the highest in the NBA draft is 38”. If the NFL combine recorded running vertical jumps they’d probably be in the 50 to 54” range. The D&D distances for running vertical jumps are so out of whack, however, I just went with those.
Actually, the highest for the NBA draft is also 46". D. J. Stephens set the vertical leap record in 2013 at 46 inches (1.17 m). His standing leap was 40".

I think you missed it where I said the distances given in the chart are in addition to a character’s normal jump distance based on their Strength.
Nailed it! I did miss that.

I consider the distance listed in the jump rules as the maximum with normal maximum effort, so were I to make a DC chart, I'd go with a DC 10 at 1' additional distance, 15 for 2', 20 for 3', and so on. 5 additional feet at DC 30 would put a strength 20 individual at 25 feet. Seeing as the world record is 29 feet, I think a 25 foot maximum is reasonable. These are well rounded heroes, not athletes that focus on a few events to the exclusion of all others.
 

clearstream

Explorer
This is all fairly convincing, in light of which I’d use the following set of DCs, based on the probability of a 0th level, STR 16 character with Athletics proficiency hitting a DC 25, and current records for various jumps:
DCrunning horizontal jumpstanding horizontal jumprunning vertical jumpstanding vertical jump
103 feet1 foot6 inches3 inches
156 feet2 feet1 foot6 inches
209 feet3 feet1 foot 6 inches9 inches
2512 feet4 feet2 feet1 foot
3015 feet5 feet2 feet 6 inches1 foot 3 inches
Distances given are in addition to normal jump distance.

Strangely, the Basic Rules describe a vertical jump, while, in the case of a run-up, the numbers given are closer to a high jump. For a standing vertical jump, though, the heights seem to match NFL combine vertical jump records.
I like it! The payoff for a flat add in ease of use and fixing the High Strength DC barrier looks well justified.

However one tweak - as you have it, starting at DC 10 - your idea is complicated to express as a rule. Let's start at DC 5. Do we really care if characters can jump 3' more? With that, one can then express the rule -

Long jump = "With a running start the DC is 5 per 3' further than your usual distance, or per 1' without."
High jump = "With a running start the DC is 5 per 6" higher than your usual distance, or per 3" without."

I think allowing a Level 8 Half-Orc Champion with Strength 24, Athletics and Prodigy, an automatic jump (succeeds on 1+) of 37' instead of 34' is basically fine. While at the other end, allowing a Level 1 Human Wizard with Strength 3 to clear 6' with 9+ and 9' with 14+ is probably a good idea.
 
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Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
I like it! The payoff for a flat add in ease of use and fixing the High Strength DC barrier looks well justified.

However one tweak - as you have it, starting at DC 10 - your idea is complicated to express as a rule. Let's start at DC 5. Do we really care if characters can jump 3' more? With that, one can then express the rule -

Long jump = "With a running start the DC is 5 per 3' further than your usual distance, or per 1' without."
High jump = "With a running start the DC is 5 per 6" higher than your usual distance, or per 3" without."

I think allowing a Level 8 Half-Orc Champion with Strength 24, Athletics and Prodigy, an automatic jump (succeeds on 1+) of 37' instead of 34' is basically fine. While at the other end, allowing a Level 1 Human Wizard with Strength 3 to clear 6' with 9+ and 9' with 14+ is probably a good idea.

Some things. First, I thought a 20 strength was the most you could have without receiving epic boons. Level 8 seems a bit low to be receiving those. Second, if you are starting at DC 5, then DC 30 increases to 18 feet additional. With a 24 strength, 18 additional feet, plus an additional 7 feet for strength modified of a champion, you have this half orc leaping 49 feet with a DC 30. 20 feet farther than the current world record. That seems excessive to me. Third, I'm not sure you understand how weak a 3 strength is. A pixie has a 2, a pseudodragon which fits on a book has a 6, a sprite has a 3, and a stirge has a 4. These are creatures whose size is measured in inches, not feet and they are still stronger than the human wizard you are referencing. Heck, even a house cat has a 3. A house cat can jump 8 feet, and they are not only physically built for jumping(unlike the wizard), but only weigh about 5 pounds(also unlike the wizard). Increasing a 3 strength wizard's leap from 3 feet to 4 would be a major undertaking. Allowing a wizard to go up to 9 feet or 3x his normal distance is like allowing the above barbarian to go 72 feet.
 

Kobold Boots

Villager
Well, yeah, that's the whole point of the thread. The rules say you can possible jump farther than your strength would normally allow, without telling you how to determine difficulty or otherwise adjudicate it. Hence "incomplete."
I appreciate what you're saying here but it misses the point I was making.

If at max strength allowed in the game for the race of the character, the character still would not make the jump.. the character can not do it without some sort of assistance regardless of how well the player rolls. So you have some basis for how to judge the matter distance wise (any distance to the max allowable strength) and DC wise (split the distances up to max DC and apply appropriately)

Just because something isn't explicitly stated in the rules to cover a specific situation, does not mean that you can't operate within or combine the rules as written to come out with a logical answer. I do agree that coming up with such a thing on the fly is tough because you're trying to conserve time and handle something to the tastes of a bunch of people at the table, so I'm not saying anyone should have come up with such a thought process in the moment.

However, as you DM and gain experience over time, these things become easier, it's like the difference between being fluent in a language and actually thinking in the language. While the above came naturally to me in looking at your question, I doubt it would have five years ago.

We just have different thoughts about what is and what is not "incomplete."

Thanks,
KB
 

clearstream

Explorer
Some things. First, I thought a 20 strength was the most you could have without receiving epic boons. Level 8 seems a bit low to be receiving those.
Sure. I think the purpose of testing the bounds is to find an extreme, but plausible, case. Let's call it 24 Strength, but tier 3, so +7 +8 = +15 ability.

Second, if you are starting at DC 5, then DC 30 increases to 18 feet additional. With a 24 strength, 18 additional feet, plus an additional 7 feet for strength modified of a champion, you have this half orc leaping 49 feet with a DC 30. 20 feet farther than the current world record. That seems excessive to me.
There are lots of things in heroic fantasy that seem excessive to me. A Tier 3 Half-Orc Champion Prodigy (Athletics), with Epic Strength leaping 49' is not one of them. Especially not when the Dragonborn "Dragoon" Warlock is jumping further!

Third, I'm not sure you understand how weak a 3 strength is. A pixie has a 2, a pseudodragon which fits on a book has a 6, a sprite has a 3, and a stirge has a 4. These are creatures whose size is measured in inches, not feet and they are still stronger than the human wizard you are referencing. Heck, even a house cat has a 3. A house cat can jump 8 feet, and they are not only physically built for jumping(unlike the wizard), but only weigh about 5 pounds(also unlike the wizard). Increasing a 3 strength wizard's leap from 3 feet to 4 would be a major undertaking. Allowing a wizard to go up to 9 feet or 3x his normal distance is like allowing the above barbarian to go 72 feet.
I did consider that, and I am mindful of what 3 Strength entails. Two factors that weigh on this for me are 1) what is the pay off for added complication? and 2) could it be problematic at the table if weak creatures can't jump far? The answer to 1, for me, is that I don't really see any pay off. We get a more realistic version of something that is unrealistic in the first place. The answer to 2 is that how far characters need to jump is up to me as DM (I created the pit, chasm, etc they must jump, after all!) For things like jumping, swimming and climbing, I think the bigger risk is that weaker characters are too far from stronger characters, than that they are nearer. One ends up mandating that players help each other with a rope or whatever, in which case the weak character's jump is unimportant. I'd have more fun if the weak character gave it a try and plunged to their doom. I'm also mindful that the Cleric will throw in Guidance, the Monk will Step of the Wind, the Warlock will Otherworldly Leap, the Wizard might cast Jump, and the Bard throw Bardic Inspiration.

I did point out that scaling percentually could make more sense than a flat add, but a flat add is more streamlined. Steps of 3' feel decent. One could start at DC 5 and go steps of 2', but then nearly impossible is +12 not +15. Maybe that is better?
 

Hriston

Explorer
Actually, the highest for the NBA draft is also 46". D. J. Stephens set the vertical leap record in 2013 at 46 inches (1.17 m). His standing leap was 40".
Okay, I missed the 40" standing vertical jump, but the NFL combine record of 46", set by Gerald Sensabaugh in 2005, is for a standing vertical jump, not a running vertical jump, beating Stephens's NBA draft combine record by 6".
 

Hriston

Explorer
I like it! The payoff for a flat add in ease of use and fixing the High Strength DC barrier looks well justified.

However one tweak - as you have it, starting at DC 10 - your idea is complicated to express as a rule. Let's start at DC 5. Do we really care if characters can jump 3' more? With that, one can then express the rule -

Long jump = "With a running start the DC is 5 per 3' further than your usual distance, or per 1' without."
High jump = "With a running start the DC is 5 per 6" higher than your usual distance, or per 3" without."

I think allowing a Level 8 Half-Orc Champion with Strength 24, Athletics and Prodigy, an automatic jump (succeeds on 1+) of 37' instead of 34' is basically fine. While at the other end, allowing a Level 1 Human Wizard with Strength 3 to clear 6' with 9+ and 9' with 14+ is probably a good idea.
The reason I have for starting with DC 10 is that I assume a character's normal jump is a very easy task (DC 5), and that the PHB is basically following the advice in the DMG in letting "characters succeed in such a task without making a check."

To express this as a rule, I'd tweak my numbers a little and use the following formulae:

For a running long jump, the DC is 5 + 3 for every 2 feet you attempt in addition to your normal distance.

For a standing long jump, the DC is 5 + 5 for each foot you attempt in addition to your normal distance.

For a running high jump, the DC is 5 + 1 for each inch you attempt in addition to your normal distance.

For a standing high jump, the DC is 5 + 2 for each inch you attempt in addition to your normal distance.
 

clearstream

Explorer
The reason I have for starting with DC 10 is that I assume a character's normal jump is a very easy task (DC 5), and that the PHB is basically following the advice in the DMG in letting "characters succeed in such a task without making a check."

To express this as a rule, I'd tweak my numbers a little and use the following formulae:

For a running long jump, the DC is 5 + 3 for every 2 feet you attempt in addition to your normal distance.

For a standing long jump, the DC is 5 + 5 for each foot you attempt in addition to your normal distance.

For a running high jump, the DC is 5 + 1 for each inch you attempt in addition to your normal distance.

For a standing high jump, the DC is 5 + 2 for each inch you attempt in addition to your normal distance.
I was thinking about the fact that, as I use a battle map, jumps are often in whole squares (units of 5'). Maybe DC 10 per extra square is okay? For long jump distance.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
There are lots of things in heroic fantasy that seem excessive to me. A Tier 3 Half-Orc Champion Prodigy (Athletics), with Epic Strength leaping 49' is not one of them. Especially not when the Dragonborn "Dragoon" Warlock is jumping further!
I'm sure we just have different thresholds for realism. 49 feet is beyond the pale for me without magic, vestigial wings, or something else to aid the leap.

I did consider that, and I am mindful of what 3 Strength entails. Two factors that weigh on this for me are 1) what is the pay off for added complication? and 2) could it be problematic at the table if weak creatures can't jump far? The answer to 1, for me, is that I don't really see any pay off. We get a more realistic version of something that is unrealistic in the first place.
For me the added realism is its own payoff. I don't want to mirror reality, but the farther a game gets from reality with regard to the mundane aspects of that game, the less I enjoy it. Realistic vs. unrealistic is not a dichotomy. It's a sliding scale, so moving down the scale a bit more than D&D starts at, towards the most realistic end is where I like to be.

The answer to 2 is that how far characters need to jump is up to me as DM (I created the pit, chasm, etc they must jump, after all!) For things like jumping, swimming and climbing, I think the bigger risk is that weaker characters are too far from stronger characters, than that they are nearer. One ends up mandating that players help each other with a rope or whatever, in which case the weak character's jump is unimportant.
God forbid a team actually engage in teamwork. ;)

I really, really like PCs that have strengths and weaknesses. I don't feel the need to give crutches to the PCs to compensate for a weakness. Let the weakness have in impact in the game as something to be overcome, whether through a rope, the jump spell, or some other way. For me that adds a great deal more to the game than giving everyone a chance to be successful at everything.

I did point out that scaling percentually could make more sense than a flat add, but a flat add is more streamlined. Steps of 3' feel decent. One could start at DC 5 and go steps of 2', but then nearly impossible is +12 not +15. Maybe that is better?
Were I to do it that way, I'd make it 1' increments. My preference, though, is to just leave it as is, and that's what I will do when I start running 5e, which should be somewhat soon. I'm excited to start. Back on topic, though, by leaving it unset with DCs and increments, the players are encouraged to come up with ideas like leaping off of rocks, swinging the platforms, etc. Once I have what they describe their character doing, I can rate the DCs and potential ranges very quickly in my head and have the player roll/
 

Hriston

Explorer
I was thinking about the fact that, as I use a battle map, jumps are often in whole squares (units of 5'). Maybe DC 10 per extra square is okay? For long jump distance.
I thought about that too, but since normal jump distance is already given in increments of 1 foot or less, I wasn’t sure if 5 foot increments would be all that useful. Maybe I don’t play on a grid often enough. For a running long jump, however, I’d go with DC 12 to add 5 feet to your jump, DC 20 to add 10 feet, and DC 27 to add 15 feet. For a standing long jump, I’d put adding 5 feet to your jump at DC 28.
 

clearstream

Explorer
I thought about that too, but since normal jump distance is already given in increments of 1 foot or less, I wasn’t sure if 5 foot increments would be all that useful. Maybe I don’t play on a grid often enough. For a running long jump, however, I’d go with DC 12 to add 5 feet to your jump, DC 20 to add 10 feet, and DC 27 to add 15 feet. For a standing long jump, I’d put adding 5 feet to your jump at DC 28.
Indeed, which brought me around to possibly -

Long jump—with a running start the DC is 2 per foot over your usual distance, or 4 per foot without.

High jump = with a running start the DC is 1 per inch over your usual distance, or 2 per inch without.

This matches your table fairly well, but with a streamlined method for setting DC. For standing jumps, I'm suggesting doubling the DC instead of halving the distance. It will amount to the same thing, in terms of what a character can achieve. The translation that has happened is essentially - take the principle of DC = distance, but split it so half will be baseline and half will be overage; and in reciprocation double DCs so extra feet are +2 instead of +1.
 
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