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D&D General Monsters from secondary Monster Manuals you got a lot of fun out

Aging Bard

Canaith
The 1e Fiend Folio gets a bad rap for filler monsters, but people forget the iconic monsters it spawned: Aarackocra, Giths, Bullywugs, Drow, Smirvneblin, Kenku, Kuo-Toa, Asian Dragons, and so on. My personal favorites were the Bloodworm and Penanggalan, which populated a literal river of blood in a module for my group.
 

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Richards

Legend
In 3.0/3.5, I've gotten a lot of use out of jermlaine, osquips, iron cobras, mongrelfolk, dread guards, neogi, myconids, needlefolk, and quite a few of the oddball dragons from Draconomicon.

Johnathan
 

Faolyn

Hero
I recently used a wingless wonder to great effect. The PCs wouldn't go near it, because when I described them getting right up to the wall of the pen it was kept in, they could feel their connection to magic ebb away.
 


Richards

Legend
Wingless Wonder

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Johnathan
 

Yora

Legend
Certainly doesn't have wings.

I sat down and made a list of all monster that appeared in 5th edition which first appeared in 3rd and 4th edition. That list looks as follows:

Chuul
Kruthik
Nothic
Sibirex

That's it...
A bit disappointing for nine monster books over 15 years.
 

Mistwell

Crusty Old Meatwad (he/him)
So many. Lots of good ones mentioned in this thread so far, like Leucrottas, hook horrors, grell magmen, grell, drow, slaadi, astral stalkers, formorian, aarackocra, gith, bullywug, kenky, kuo-toa...
 

el-remmen

Moderator Emeritus
Like others have mentioned, the 1E Fiend Folio is my go-to book.

I think I used Volts at some point in almost every campaign and I was literally just adapting Needlemen into a playable race (using the Bas-Lag cactacae as an inspiration).

And of course, the classic hook horror (which I prefer to the spindly insect looking ones)

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208339116_342375537255199_1786243806705176289_n.jpg
211440757_406065404066572_6321459143579076462_n.jpg
 

Richards

Legend
I sat down and made a list of all monster that appeared in 5th edition which first appeared in 3rd and 4th edition. That list looks as follows:

Chuul
Kruthik
Nothic
Sibirex

That's it...
A bit disappointing for nine monster books over 15 years.
What about the girallon? Isn't it in the Volo's Guide? That first showed up in 3E, although really it's not much more than a Barsoomian great white ape with the serial numbers filed off.

Johnathan
 


Yora

Legend
It's actually just a piscoloth yugoloth from Planescape. Same body, and attacks with two big pincers and paralyzes with its mouth tentacles.

Below, you have a picture of me with a humble pie:
  • Chuul (3rd Ed., Monster Manual; 2000)
  • Girallon (3rd Ed., Monster Manual; 2000)
  • Gray Render (3rd Ed., Monster Manual; 2000)
  • Grick (3rd Ed., Monster Manual; 2000)
  • Eidolon (3rd Ed., Monster Manual 2; 2002)
  • Twig Blight (3rd Ed., Monster Manual 2; 2002)
  • Steel Predator (3rd Ed., Fiend Folio; 2003)
  • Vine Blight (3rd Ed., Fiend Folio; 2003)
  • Kruthik (3rd Ed. Miniatures Handbook; 2003)
  • Nothic (3rd Ed. Miniatures Handbook; 2003)
  • Mindwitness (3rd Ed., Underdark; 2003)
  • Wood Woad (3rd Ed., Monster Manual 3; 2004)
  • Balhannoth (3rd Ed., Monster Manual 4; 2006)
  • Sibirex (3rd Ed., Fiendish Codex 1; 2006)
  • Merregon (3rd Ed., Fiendish Codex 2; 2006)
  • Orthon (3rd Ed., Fiendish Codex 2; 2006)
  • Skull Lord (3rd Ed., Monster Manual 5; 2007)
  • Elemental Myrmidon (4th Ed., Monster Manual; 2008)
  • Star Spawn (4th Ed., Monster Manual 2; 2009)
  • Banderhobb (4th Ed., Monster Manual 3; 2010)
That's 20 original monsters from 3rd and 4th edition monster books that made it into 5th edition, rather than the 4 I originally claimed.
Not exactly contenders for D&D's most memorable monsters, though.
 

I liked the various elemental demons from 4E, like the writhing crag and jarrlak. Both had interesting abilities and designs and made me wish I had miniatures for them (I've at least been working off and on in regards to first one). I managed to fit a jarrlak into my first 5E game by heavily altering a hellfire engine's statblock. The immolith thankfully did get an official mini that I've made use of before.

I did manage to create a homemade mini for the rukarazyll from 3E. I might post a pic later.
 

GuyBoy

Adventurer
Death Knight
Behir
Fomorian
Grell
Cooshee

Probably others too. I think it was Caverns of Tsojcanth that had its own monster book as an insert. Truly awesome as I recall.

I also made use of some of the critters from Deities and Demigods, particularly the Melnibone section. Tygers of Pan Tang anybody?
 

d24454_modern

Explorer
Templates. Lots and lots of templates.

I love using templates for monsters. It's a cheap way to add lots of homebrew to campaign.

Living Spell, Shadow Giant, Gerivar, Half-Fey
 


It's actually just a piscoloth yugoloth from Planescape. Same body, and attacks with two big pincers and paralyzes with its mouth tentacles.

Below, you have a picture of me with a humble pie:
  • Chuul (3rd Ed., Monster Manual; 2000)
  • Girallon (3rd Ed., Monster Manual; 2000)
  • Gray Render (3rd Ed., Monster Manual; 2000)
  • Grick (3rd Ed., Monster Manual; 2000)
  • Eidolon (3rd Ed., Monster Manual 2; 2002)
  • Twig Blight (3rd Ed., Monster Manual 2; 2002)
  • Steel Predator (3rd Ed., Fiend Folio; 2003)
  • Vine Blight (3rd Ed., Fiend Folio; 2003)
  • Kruthik (3rd Ed. Miniatures Handbook; 2003)
  • Nothic (3rd Ed. Miniatures Handbook; 2003)
  • Mindwitness (3rd Ed., Underdark; 2003)
  • Wood Woad (3rd Ed., Monster Manual 3; 2004)
  • Balhannoth (3rd Ed., Monster Manual 4; 2006)
  • Sibirex (3rd Ed., Fiendish Codex 1; 2006)
  • Merregon (3rd Ed., Fiendish Codex 2; 2006)
  • Orthon (3rd Ed., Fiendish Codex 2; 2006)
  • Skull Lord (3rd Ed., Monster Manual 5; 2007)
  • Elemental Myrmidon (4th Ed., Monster Manual; 2008)
  • Star Spawn (4th Ed., Monster Manual 2; 2009)
  • Banderhobb (4th Ed., Monster Manual 3; 2010)
That's 20 original monsters from 3rd and 4th edition monster books that made it into 5th edition, rather than the 4 I originally claimed.
Not exactly contenders for D&D's most memorable monsters, though.
Darkmantle as well. It first appeared in the 3.0 MM.
 

JEB

Hero
Below, you have a picture of me with a humble pie:
  • Chuul (3rd Ed., Monster Manual; 2000)
  • Girallon (3rd Ed., Monster Manual; 2000)
  • Gray Render (3rd Ed., Monster Manual; 2000)
  • Grick (3rd Ed., Monster Manual; 2000)
  • Eidolon (3rd Ed., Monster Manual 2; 2002)
  • Twig Blight (3rd Ed., Monster Manual 2; 2002)
  • Steel Predator (3rd Ed., Fiend Folio; 2003)
  • Vine Blight (3rd Ed., Fiend Folio; 2003)
  • Kruthik (3rd Ed. Miniatures Handbook; 2003)
  • Nothic (3rd Ed. Miniatures Handbook; 2003)
  • Mindwitness (3rd Ed., Underdark; 2003)
  • Wood Woad (3rd Ed., Monster Manual 3; 2004)
  • Balhannoth (3rd Ed., Monster Manual 4; 2006)
  • Sibirex (3rd Ed., Fiendish Codex 1; 2006)
  • Merregon (3rd Ed., Fiendish Codex 2; 2006)
  • Orthon (3rd Ed., Fiendish Codex 2; 2006)
  • Skull Lord (3rd Ed., Monster Manual 5; 2007)
  • Elemental Myrmidon (4th Ed., Monster Manual; 2008)
  • Star Spawn (4th Ed., Monster Manual 2; 2009)
  • Banderhobb (4th Ed., Monster Manual 3; 2010)
That's 20 original monsters from 3rd and 4th edition monster books that made it into 5th edition, rather than the 4 I originally claimed.
Not exactly contenders for D&D's most memorable monsters, though.
Darkmantle as well. It first appeared in the 3.0 MM.

I actually made a huge personal list on this topic a while back, for a project, so I can add more to the above:

Originally from 3.0/3.5:
Atropal (Tomb of Annihilation)
Allip (Mordenkainen's)
Assassin Vine (Tomb of Annihilation)
Beholder: Gazer (originally known as the Eyeball) (Volo's)
Boneclaw (Mordenkainen's)
Cadaver Collector (Mordenkainen's)
Deathlock (Mordenkainen's)
Demons: Alkilith, Dybbuk, Maw Demon (originally known as the Abyssal Maw) (Mordenkainen's)
Devils: Hellfire Engine, Narzugon (Mordenkainen's)
Draegloth (Volo's)
Drakes: Ambush Drake (Tyranny of Dragons)
Frost Worm (Wildemount)
Homunculus: Iron Defender (Eberron)
Shield Guardian (Monster Manual)

Originally from 4E:
Devils: Hellwasp (Descent Into Avernus)
Drakes: Guard Drake (Volo's)
Gnolls: Witherling (Volo's)
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
I've used nearly half the monsters in the old AC09, Creature Catalog back in the day. Agarat, Wychglow, White-Fang, all the Fundamentals, Tabi, Sea Serpents, Thunderheads, Nagpa, Kopru, the Hivebrood, Vampire Roses, Sirenflowers, Vapour Ghouls...seriously, I could go on. This book had so many awesome monsters, plus a sensible habitat index and rules for balancing encounters (which was huge for those of us running the B/X rules).

I still convert a monster from this book into 5E every now and then when I'm in the mood for a classic.

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EDIT: I couldn't leave well enough alone, and I just had to know how many of these monsters I've used in a game. Out of the 278 monsters in this accessory, I've used 151 of them over the last 30 years...about 54%. I highly recommend this accessory.
 
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GuyBoy

Adventurer
I've used nearly half the monsters in the old AC09, Creature Catalog back in the day. Agarat, Wychglow, White-Fang, all the Fundamentals, Tabi, Sea Serpents, Thunderheads, Nagpa, Kopru, the Hivebrood, Vampire Roses, Sirenflowers, Vapour Ghouls...seriously, I could go on. This book had so many awesome monsters, plus a sensible habitat index and rules for balancing encounters (which was huge for those of us running the B/X rules).

I still convert a monster from this book into 5E every now and then when I'm in the mood for a classic.

View attachment 140311
Loved this book. Thanks for reminding me of it. After recent events, it’s good to see the TSR logo in a positive light.
 

CleverNickName

Limit Break Dancing
Loved this book. Thanks for reminding me of it. After recent events, it’s good to see the TSR logo in a positive light.
I love this book too, but I admit that it's far from flawless. Many of the entries have the same issues of poor representation and racial stereotyping that plague much of TSR's earlier stuff. ("Primitive Man" and the Kara-Kara are probably the most cringe-inducing examples. It's probably best to use the Humanoids chapter very carefully, and steer clear of those two entries in particular.)
 

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