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Mutants & Masterminds

Kurashu

First Post
A friend and I have been trying to figure out a good way to pull off a superhero RPG. I was told about this book from Green Ronin.

We're looking to run anything from grim & gritty to Golden Age Superman stuff.

So, how is it?
 

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mr_outsidevoice

First Post
It is a very good system

Their are supplements out to show how to run Golden Age, Agent Level(think SHIELD), and in a couple of months, Dark and Gritty.

You only have to worry about 1 die roll.

You should give it a shot.
 

jonrog1

First Post
It is indeed a heckuva system. I'd tweak the wound/stun rules myself, a bit, but seriously, I've built everything from D&D characters to WW2 soldiers to mecha to superheroes with this thing. Scale's a bit wonky over that range for power (and yet it still works, don't get me wrong), but for what you're looking for, it's the best.
 


BkMamba

First Post
Mutants & Masterminds 2E is my superhero system of choice. The game is OGL, so it will be easy for you to learn, and fast-paced but very unlike traditional d20. You can see some Marvel and DC character write-ups using the system here. You can download a PDF of the entire first chapter of the book from here along with some examples and adventures. I would also recommend you check out the M&M section of Green Ronin's website to see what is available and what is coming out soon.
 

EditorBFG

First Post
I have yet to encounter something from superhero comics that could not be simulated with this system. Character creation can be as complex as you want or as simple is you want. Combat is faster-paced than any d20-based system there is. It is also compatible with any other d20 based game with some very simple conversion work. You can do any genre, especially with the optional rules in the Mastermind's Manual. A clever, elegant, powerful system that delivers precisely what is advertised: the World's Greatest Superhero Role-playing Game.

So, yeah, it's pretty good.
 

ValhallaGH

First Post
I, and a group of friends, regularly play a superhero game on Wednesdays using the M&M 2E rules. Elegant, powerful and clever, they allow for just about any level of power, action or adventure that you want. An excellent system and I think it will work beautifully for you.
 


Henry

Autoexreginated
Mutants and Masterminds is The Most Awesome Superhero Game Ever Created. Steve Kenson is a God among Men who leaves Awesomeness Footprints wherever he Treads.

In other words, I highly recommend it. :)

If you are looking to do all genres from four-color to grit and all in between, I also hear that the companion volume, the Mastermind's Manual, gives lots of optional rules and tips to help with that. The core book discusses it and offers some suggestions, but I think the Masterminds Manual goes into more detail.
 

takyris

First Post
I think it's a great system. I also think that whether it's the right system for you and your group depends on a few things:

- GM Presence: M&M is a very breakable game if the players want to abuse things and the GM isn't strong enough to say, "Sorry, not in this game." While few GMs would admit to being pushovers, it's something that they may have to stay on top of. I don't know how much D&D you play, but assume that M&M, right out of the Core Book, has the potential breakability of D&D with four splatbooks and two additional third-party books full of feats and prestige classes. (Note: This doesn't mean that it's a bad system. It's an awesome system. Its configurability is one of the things that makes it awesome, and it can also lead players to do things that ruin the game.)

- Group Learning Ability: M&M uses a different damage system from D&D and d20 Modern (which may not be what you play, but this board skews toward d20, so that's what I'm assuming), and it can take a little getting used to. If learning new rules is a huge pain for your group, you may be better off with a hit-point-based system (Blood & Vigilance, Four Color to Fantasy, etc), which is more clearly tied to d20 Modern and D&D.

- Combat Crunch Value: This one's harder to define, exactly, but combat in M&M is fast and furious. You know how in D&D, a high-level fight against a big boss and his lieutenants can sometimes take close to an hour per round? (At least, it was that way for me -- having each of the 8 beholders target people, rolling spell resistance, concealment, damage, saving throws, checking the book for immunities, etc.) You don't get that in M&M. The fight that might have taken three sessions in D&D is over in less than an hour in M&M. For some players, who like the nitty gritty tactical detail, that's a bad thing. For some GMs, who are used to having that big combat be the only thing they have to plan, that's a bad thing, too. I don't know that this is an issue worth staying away over, but it's worth testing out some combats with default characters, just to see how it feels. Some people don't like it. (For the record, I love it -- but it does feel different.)

Those are the issues I'd think about. I'm loving the game, and it's working really well for me, but if the above issues trigger immediate "Gaahh!!!" reactions, then it might not be the right game for you.
 

Threedub

First Post
takyris said:
- GM Presence: M&M is a very breakable game if the players want to abuse things and the GM isn't strong enough to say, "Sorry, not in this game." While few GMs would admit to being pushovers, it's something that they may have to stay on top of. I don't know how much D&D you play, but assume that M&M, right out of the Core Book, has the potential breakability of D&D with four splatbooks and two additional third-party books full of feats and prestige classes. (Note: This doesn't mean that it's a bad system. It's an awesome system. Its configurability is one of the things that makes it awesome, and it can also lead players to do things that ruin the game.)

This is the biggest "flaw" of the game. And I say "flaw" because it really isn't, you just need to play with RP mature people (and you can be RP mature at 13). If the characters are really unbalanced with regard to one another it can be very hard to present them with challenges that everyone can get in on, without making it feel contrived after a while.
 

Ben Robbins

First Post
takyris said:
- GM Presence: M&M is a very breakable game if the players want to abuse things and the GM isn't strong enough to say, "Sorry, not in this game." While few GMs would admit to being pushovers, it's something that they may have to stay on top of.
I assume you mean during character creation. It's a common problem with point-buy systems, moreso in the superhero genre since the genre itself allows almost any concept.
 

Angel Tarragon

Dawn Dragon
I've played using the 1st and 2nd Edition MnM rules. I find the system to be quite liberating and have even used it once to create an NPC for my hombrew DnD game. The rules are easy to understand, due to the fact that it stems from the OGL/D20 base.
 

takyris

First Post
Ben Robbins said:
I assume you mean during character creation. It's a common problem with point-buy systems, moreso in the superhero genre since the genre itself allows almost any concept.

Definitely during character creation (if you're starting a campaign, the first session should be "getting characters sussed out", and that's assuming that you did some homework with each player before the session, too, to get a groundwork), but also during play. Things like Hero Point expenditures or allocation of power points for Variable powers can be very creative and wonderful in the right hands and very game-breaking and fun-stealing in the wrong hands.

As Threedub said, though, it's not so much a flaw as a requirement -- point buy systems always have this level of customizability (and thus breakability), and it's always a matter of having a GM who can say, "Wow, Incorporeality except to Silver, and Immunity:Silver Weapons? You know, I'm thinking 'no'."

But yeah, as you say, while in D&D, somebody's half-dragon splatbook-race mystic theurge is easy to nip in the bud by saying, "Core races and classes only." In Mutants & Masterminds, a huge ancient red dragon with incorporeality, shapeshifting, and mind-reading powers is a perfectly viable character concept, but if the other hero is a dude whose power is the ability to pull friendly animals out of his magic trenchcoat, the game might be a bit unbalanced.
 

EditorBFG

First Post
takyris said:
If learning new rules is a huge pain for your group, you may be better off with a hit-point-based system (Blood & Vigilance, Four Color to Fantasy, etc), which is more clearly tied to d20 Modern and D&D.
Just wanted to mention, the Mastermind's Manual has rules for converting M&M to hit points, which can be helpful.
 

Bit late to the party...

Mutants and Masterminds (particularly 2nd edition) is one of the best supers RPGs in print today. And this is coming from a guy that for years touted Champions/HERO as the best supers RPG.

M&M has all the flexibility of HERO system without excessive number-crunching, and the combat system feels like you're reading a comic book fight; it's fast paced, doesn't drag out (unless the GM wants it to via GM fiat, and even then the good guys get a perk for when the GM "bends" the rules in favor of the bad guys).

I play in a Justice League themed game, with a roster of Superman, Wonder Woman, Batman, Green Lantern (Kyle Rayner), Flash (Wally West), and Hawkgirl (DC animated version). And M&M handles each of them perfectly.
 

chobin foot

First Post
As said by others... it's amazing. As someone who got really turned off by 3.5 and D20, I was stunned. Absolutely stunned. Maybe this would not be true for all M&M fans, but I was floored because I was completely prepared not to like M&M at all.

I could not believe that anyone could make a Superhero game out of D20 based on the 5' moves and the tedium of 3.5 combat... so I didn't want anything to do with M&M. I could not have been more wrong. That kind of toil & tedium from D&D got lifted out from what Kenson & company at Green Ronin put in to M&M.

Exalted was one of those games you look at as another way to approach the topic of Fantasy. M&M, True20... these things made me remember how good it is to roll a 20-sided die. Now I'm wondering why it took so long for me to discover Green Ronin's stuff. It completely opened my eyes to non-Wizards products for D20/OGL... I feel silly for supporting WotC for so long.
 

The_Universe

First Post
I'll chime in. Not only is Mutants and Masterminds my favorite Superhero system, EVER, it's also (currently) my favorite RPG system, EVER. With just a bit of GM dilligence, it can model ANY genre...which is really quite apropriate for a comic-book-based RPG. I love it...and if I had to pick only one system to run, forever, it would be this one.
 



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