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D&D 5E My guess for the other D&D book this year... Draconomicon!

We know the fifth major product this year will be James Wyatt‘s as-yet unannounced project, and we know it will be coming out this year between Witchlight and Strixhaven. Wyatt co-wrote the Draconomicon for 3E. There have been two recent dragon-themed Unearthed Arcanasdragon-themed subclasses, and Draconic Options with new dragon-themed spells and Dragonborn variants. He co-wrote those, too. The Gothic Lineages UA turned into Ravenloft, and the Folk of the Feywild UA turned into Witchlight.

Plus the new Dragonlance novel trilogy launches very soon (though that’s licensed out).

So far this year we've already seen or know about two settings (Ravenloft and Strixhaven), and two adventures (Candlekeep and Witchlight). It feels like a rules supplement (monsters, player options, magic items, etc) is due.

I have no inside knowledge on this; it’s 100% a guess. But it sounds like it has gotta be a dragon book. X’s Guide to Dragons? A new Draconomicon?


C73F8DD1-1B43-4A80-82A3-23A9D42D1AB7.jpeg

D&D 3E Draconomicon (2003)​
 

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

TheAlkaizer

Game Designer
It is entirely possible that some features of early editions are better designed, in the context of appealing to the most gamers, and have nothing to do with nostalgia.

I'm sure appealing to the masses was among the design intentions, but 5E was still designed as a reaction to the failure of 4E and people accusing them moving too far from what is D&D. I'm not trying to edition bash. But there's so many dubious design decisions that I can't find any justification from except "it's the way we did it for before 4E so we'll do it that way still". 4E, for all its problem, at least attempted to fix some of the design issues. It worked for certain things, not for others. But the baby was thrown out with the bath water when they decided to do a hard turn and go back.

I can see how someone can have this impression if they completely ignore literally all of the pages of flavor text that precedes each type of dragon's stat block.
Flavor is fun. I like reading it. It's certainly useful to put my monsters in context, give out clues. But it rarely, or at least in the case of dragons, doesn't make the encounters more fun, diverse or different from one another. In my opinion, out of everything 5E does, from exceptionally well to exceptionally bad - the monster design and the encounter building tools are probably the worst. It's so boring. It's the one thing I couldn't see myself not digging in 3rd party resources to improve on.
 

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Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
There are literally dozens of articles in old Dragon magazines about making dragons more interesting.....hundreds of ideas. And, all they really are in 5e is bags of hit points with breath weapons. That said, so are high level demons and devils (Pit Fiends don't carry magic weapons, no wonder the Blood War is never ending, they can't even kill each other at high levels)......Plenty of 3rd party products are more interesting mechanically when it comes to monsters. WotC has chosen, mostly, not to take that path, imo.
These are all things in the flavor text from one type of dragaon, and all impact actual game play, both mechanically and thematically. And it's different from dragon to dragon. If you feel dragons are just bags of HP in 5e, I don't know what to tell you. There are literally pages of information given to us to keep them from being just bags of HP.

Description

The most cunning and treacherous of true dragons, green dragons use misdirection and trickery to get the upper hand against their enemies. A green dragon is recognized by the crest that begins near its eyes and continues down its spine, reaching full height just behind the skull.
The forest-loving green dragons sometimes compete for territory with black dragons in marshy woods and with white dragons in subarctic taiga. However, a forest controlled by a green dragon is easy to spot. A perpetual fog hangs in the air in a legendary green dragon’s wood, carrying an acrid whiff of the creature’s poison breath. The moss-covered trees grow close together except where winding pathways trace their way like a maze into the heart of the forest. The light that reaches the forest floor carries an emerald green cast, and every sound seems muffled.
At the center of its forest, a green dragon chooses a cave in a sheer cliff or hillside for its lair, preferring an entrance hidden from prying eyes. Some seek out cave mouths concealed behind waterfalls, or partly submerged caverns that can be accessed through lakes or streams. Others conceal the entrances to their lairs with vegetation.

Lair Actions

On initiative count 20 (losing initiative ties), the dragon takes a lair action to cause one of the following effects; the dragon can’t use the same effect two rounds in a row:
  • Grasping roots and vines erupt in a 20-foot radius centered on a point on the ground that the dragon can see within 120 feet of it. That area becomes difficult terrain, and each creature there must succeed on a DC 15 Strength saving throw or be restrained by the roots and vines. A creature can be freed if it or another creature takes an action to make a DC 15 Strength check and succeeds. The roots and vines wilt away when the dragon uses this lair action again or when the dragon dies.
  • A wall of tangled brush bristling with thorns springs into existence on a solid surface within 120 feet of the dragon. The wall is up to 60 feet long, 10 feet high, and 5 feet thick, and it blocks line of sight. When the wall appears, each creature in its area must make a DC 15 Dexterity saving throw. A creature that fails the save takes 18 (4d8) piercing damage and is pushed 5 feet out of the wall’s space, appearing on whichever side of the wall it wants. A creature can move through the wall, albeit slowly and painfully. For every 1 foot a creature travels through the wall, it must spend 4 feet of movement. Furthermore, a creature in the wall’s space must make a DC 15 Dexterity saving throw once each round it’s in contact with the wall, taking 18 (4d8) piercing damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one. Each 10-foot section of wall has AC 5, 15 hit points, vulnerability to fire damage, resistance to bludgeoning and piercing damage, and immunity to psychic damage. The wall sinks back into the ground when the dragon uses this lair action again or when the dragon dies.
  • Magical fog billows around one creature the dragon can see within 120 feet of it. The creature must succeed on a DC 15 Wisdom saving throw or be charmed by the dragon until initiative count 20 on the next round.

Regional Effects

The region containing a legendary green dragon’s lair is warped by the dragon’s magic, which creates one or more of the following effects:
  • Thickets form labyrinthine passages within 1 mile of the dragon’s lair. The thickets act as 10-foot-high, 10-foot-thick walls that block line of sight. Creatures can move through the thickets, with every 1 foot a creature moves costing it 4 feet of movement. A creature in the thickets must make a DC 15 Dexterity saving throw once each round it’s in contact with the thickets or take 3 (1d6) piercing damage from thorns.
    Each 10-foot-cube of thickets has AC 5, 30 hit points, resistance to bludgeoning and piercing damage, vulnerability to fire damage, and immunity to psychic and thunder damage.
  • Within 1 mile of its lair, the dragon leaves no physical evidence of its passage unless it wishes to. Tracking it there is impossible except by magical means. In addition, it ignores movement impediments and damage from plants in this area that are neither magical nor creatures, including the thickets described above. The plants remove themselves from the dragon’s path.
  • Rodents and birds within 1 mile of the dragon’s lair serve as the dragon’s eyes and ears. Deer and other large game are strangely absent, hinting at the presence of an unnaturally hungry predator.
If the dragon dies, the rodents and birds lose their supernatural link to it. The thickets remain, but within 1d10 days, they become mundane plants and normal difficult terrain, losing their thorns.
The most cunning and treacherous of true dragons, green dragons use misdirection and trickery to get the upper hand against their enemies. Nasty tempered and thoroughly evil, they take special pleasure in subverting and corrupting the good-hearted. In the ancient forests they roam, green dragons demonstrate an aggression that is often less about territory than it is about gaining power and wealth with as little effort as possible.
A green dragon is recognized by its curved jawline and the crest that begins near its eyes and continues down its spine, reaching full height just behind the skull. A green dragon has no external ears, but bears leathery spiked plates that run down the sides of its neck.
A wyrmling green dragon’s thin scales are a shade of green so dark as to appear nearly black. As a green dragon ages, its scales grow larger and lighter, turning shades of forest, emerald, and olive green to help it blend in with its wooded surroundings. Its wings have a dappled pattern, darker near the leading edges and lighter toward the trailing edges.
A green dragon’s legs are longer in relation to its body than with any other dragon, enabling it to easily pass over underbrush and forest debris when it walks. With its equally long neck, an older green dragon can peer over the tops of trees without rearing up.
Capricious Hunters. A green dragon hunts by patrolling its forest territory from the air and the ground. It eats any creature it can see, and will consume shrubs and small trees when hungry enough, but its favorite prey is elves.
Green dragons are consummate liars and masters of double talk. They favor intimidation of lesser creatures, but employ more subtle manipulations when dealing with other dragons. A green dragon attacks animals and monsters with no provocation, especially when dealing with potential threats to its territory. When dealing with sentient creatures, a green dragon demonstrates a lust for power that rivals its draconic desire for treasure, and it is always on the lookout for creatures that can help it further its ambitions.
A green dragon stalks its victims as it plans its assault, sometimes shadowing creatures for days. If a target is weak, the dragon enjoys the terror its appearance evokes before it attacks. It never slays all its foes, preferring to use intimidation to establish control over survivors. It then learns what it can about other creatures’ activities near its territory, and about any treasure to be found nearby. Green dragons occasionally release prisoners if they can be ransomed. Otherwise, a creature must prove its value to the dragon daily or die.
Manipulative Schemers. A wily and subtle creature, a green dragon bends other creatures to its will by assessing and playing off their deepest desires. Any creature foolish enough to attempt to subdue a green dragon eventually realizes that the creature is only pretending to serve while it assesses its would-be master.
When manipulating other creatures, green dragons are honey-tongued, smooth, and sophisticated. Among their own kind, they are loud, crass, and rude, especially when dealing with dragons of the same age and status.
Conflict and Corruption. Green dragons sometimes clash with other dragons over territory where forest crosses over into other terrain. A green dragon typically pretends to back down, only to wait and watch — sometimes for decades — for the chance to slay the other dragon, then claim its lair and hoard.
Green dragons accept the servitude of sentient creatures such as goblinoids, ettercaps, ettins, kobolds, orcs, and yuan-ti. They also delight in corrupting and bending elves to their will. A green dragon sometimes wracks its minions’ minds with fear to the point of insanity, with the fog that spreads throughout its forest reflecting those minions’ tortured dreams.
Living Treasures. A green dragon’s favored treasures are the sentient creatures it bends to its will, including significant figures such as popular heroes, well-known sages, and renowned bards. Among material treasures, a green dragon favors emeralds, wood carvings, musical instruments, and sculptures of humanoid subjects

I'm sure appealing to the masses was among the design intentions, but 5E was still designed as a reaction to the failure of 4E and people accusing them moving too far from what is D&D. I'm not trying to edition bash. But there's so many dubious design decisions that I can't find any justification from except "it's the way we did it for before 4E so we'll do it that way still".
Or maybe it was, "Here's what worked well, here's what we'll change to make it more appealing." That certainly seems more likely than just "4e sucked, let's go back to the way it was." And it's the way it should be (looking at best practices, prior successes, and current market feelings). Especially looking at how 5e is so successful in bringing in new players. And Mearls' design team spent what, 2 YEARS doing a public playtest? I'm afraid if your position is what you're saying it is, then it ignores the reality of what actually happened with the design of 5e. It seems very dismissive of the edition and handwaving away the reality of of its design
 


AcererakTriple6

Autistic DM (he/him)
To be honest, I had never even heard of Tasha before Tasha's Cauldron of Everything was announced (I had the same reaction with Volo's Guide to Monsters, too. I did know about Xanathar, Van Richten, and Mordenkainen, though), so I'm going to assume this book's narrator will be another famous NPC from a previous edition that I have know clue what their deal is.
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
To be honest, I had never even heard of Tasha before Tasha's Cauldron of Everything was announced (I had the same reaction with Volo's Guide to Monsters, too. I did know about Xanathar, Van Richten, and Mordenkainen, though), so I'm going to assume this book's narrator will be another famous NPC from a previous edition that I have know clue what their deal is.
I would be pleased if it were Wormy ;)
 

TheAlkaizer

Game Designer
I hadn't planned on doing a deep dive. But sure.
Description
The most cunning and treacherous of true dragons, green dragons use misdirection and trickery to get the upper hand against their enemies. A green dragon is recognized by the crest that begins near its eyes and continues down its spine, reaching full height just behind the skull.
The forest-loving green dragons sometimes compete for territory with black dragons in marshy woods and with white dragons in subarctic taiga. However, a forest controlled by a green dragon is easy to spot. A perpetual fog hangs in the air in a legendary green dragon’s wood, carrying an acrid whiff of the creature’s poison breath. The moss-covered trees grow close together except where winding pathways trace their way like a maze into the heart of the forest. The light that reaches the forest floor carries an emerald green cast, and every sound seems muffled.
At the center of its forest, a green dragon chooses a cave in a sheer cliff or hillside for its lair, preferring an entrance hidden from prying eyes. Some seek out cave mouths concealed behind waterfalls, or partly submerged caverns that can be accessed through lakes or streams. Others conceal the entrances to their lairs with vegetation.
All relevant information. As I said, very useful to know what clues to give your players, what the dragon looks like, the type of places it lives. I'm happy they include this information, but this has no effect on combat.

Regional Effects

The region containing a legendary green dragon’s lair is warped by the dragon’s magic, which creates one or more of the following effects:
  • Thickets form labyrinthine passages within 1 mile of the dragon’s lair. The thickets act as 10-foot-high, 10-foot-thick walls that block line of sight. Creatures can move through the thickets, with every 1 foot a creature moves costing it 4 feet of movement. A creature in the thickets must make a DC 15 Dexterity saving throw once each round it’s in contact with the thickets or take 3 (1d6) piercing damage from thorns.
    Each 10-foot-cube of thickets has AC 5, 30 hit points, resistance to bludgeoning and piercing damage, vulnerability to fire damage, and immunity to psychic and thunder damage.
  • Within 1 mile of its lair, the dragon leaves no physical evidence of its passage unless it wishes to. Tracking it there is impossible except by magical means. In addition, it ignores movement impediments and damage from plants in this area that are neither magical nor creatures, including the thickets described above. The plants remove themselves from the dragon’s path.
  • Rodents and birds within 1 mile of the dragon’s lair serve as the dragon’s eyes and ears. Deer and other large game are strangely absent, hinting at the presence of an unnaturally hungry predator.
Once again, great stuff. I love the regional effects. They're great to inspire skill challenges, clues and the environment the players must traverse to get to the dragon. But these don't make my encounter more interesting. I guess I could sprinkle some thicket from the first effect around my encounter area? That could have an effect and maybe force some tactical decisions. So very flavorful, but has no effect on the whole bag of HP thing.

If the dragon dies, the rodents and birds lose their supernatural link to it. The thickets remain, but within 1d10 days, they become mundane plants and normal difficult terrain, losing their thorns.
The most cunning and treacherous of true dragons, green dragons use misdirection and trickery to get the upper hand against their enemies. Nasty tempered and thoroughly evil, they take special pleasure in subverting and corrupting the good-hearted. In the ancient forests they roam, green dragons demonstrate an aggression that is often less about territory than it is about gaining power and wealth with as little effort as possible.
A green dragon is recognized by its curved jawline and the crest that begins near its eyes and continues down its spine, reaching full height just behind the skull. A green dragon has no external ears, but bears leathery spiked plates that run down the sides of its neck.
A wyrmling green dragon’s thin scales are a shade of green so dark as to appear nearly black. As a green dragon ages, its scales grow larger and lighter, turning shades of forest, emerald, and olive green to help it blend in with its wooded surroundings. Its wings have a dappled pattern, darker near the leading edges and lighter toward the trailing edges.
A green dragon’s legs are longer in relation to its body than with any other dragon, enabling it to easily pass over underbrush and forest debris when it walks. With its equally long neck, an older green dragon can peer over the tops of trees without rearing up.
Capricious Hunters. A green dragon hunts by patrolling its forest territory from the air and the ground. It eats any creature it can see, and will consume shrubs and small trees when hungry enough, but its favorite prey is elves.
Green dragons are consummate liars and masters of double talk. They favor intimidation of lesser creatures, but employ more subtle manipulations when dealing with other dragons. A green dragon attacks animals and monsters with no provocation, especially when dealing with potential threats to its territory. When dealing with sentient creatures, a green dragon demonstrates a lust for power that rivals its draconic desire for treasure, and it is always on the lookout for creatures that can help it further its ambitions.
A green dragon stalks its victims as it plans its assault, sometimes shadowing creatures for days. If a target is weak, the dragon enjoys the terror its appearance evokes before it attacks. It never slays all its foes, preferring to use intimidation to establish control over survivors. It then learns what it can about other creatures’ activities near its territory, and about any treasure to be found nearby. Green dragons occasionally release prisoners if they can be ransomed. Otherwise, a creature must prove its value to the dragon daily or die.
Manipulative Schemers. A wily and subtle creature, a green dragon bends other creatures to its will by assessing and playing off their deepest desires. Any creature foolish enough to attempt to subdue a green dragon eventually realizes that the creature is only pretending to serve while it assesses its would-be master.
When manipulating other creatures, green dragons are honey-tongued, smooth, and sophisticated. Among their own kind, they are loud, crass, and rude, especially when dealing with dragons of the same age and status.
Conflict and Corruption. Green dragons sometimes clash with other dragons over territory where forest crosses over into other terrain. A green dragon typically pretends to back down, only to wait and watch — sometimes for decades — for the chance to slay the other dragon, then claim its lair and hoard.
Green dragons accept the servitude of sentient creatures such as goblinoids, ettercaps, ettins, kobolds, orcs, and yuan-ti. They also delight in corrupting and bending elves to their will. A green dragon sometimes wracks its minions’ minds with fear to the point of insanity, with the fog that spreads throughout its forest reflecting those minions’ tortured dreams.
Living Treasures. A green dragon’s favored treasures are the sentient creatures it bends to its will, including significant figures such as popular heroes, well-known sages, and renowned bards. Among material treasures, a green dragon favors emeralds, wood carvings, musical instruments, and sculptures of humanoid subjects
For the third time, I love all of this. I can think of a great social encounter before a potential fight. It gives you ideas for the personality of the dragon. Or maybe my players can try and reason with the dragon during the encounter to stop the fight. But overall, as you said it yourself, it's flavor. It has very little effect on the actual combat encounter.

Lair Actions

On initiative count 20 (losing initiative ties), the dragon takes a lair action to cause one of the following effects; the dragon can’t use the same effect two rounds in a row:
  • Grasping roots and vines erupt in a 20-foot radius centered on a point on the ground that the dragon can see within 120 feet of it. That area becomes difficult terrain, and each creature there must succeed on a DC 15 Strength saving throw or be restrained by the roots and vines. A creature can be freed if it or another creature takes an action to make a DC 15 Strength check and succeeds. The roots and vines wilt away when the dragon uses this lair action again or when the dragon dies.
  • A wall of tangled brush bristling with thorns springs into existence on a solid surface within 120 feet of the dragon. The wall is up to 60 feet long, 10 feet high, and 5 feet thick, and it blocks line of sight. When the wall appears, each creature in its area must make a DC 15 Dexterity saving throw. A creature that fails the save takes 18 (4d8) piercing damage and is pushed 5 feet out of the wall’s space, appearing on whichever side of the wall it wants. A creature can move through the wall, albeit slowly and painfully. For every 1 foot a creature travels through the wall, it must spend 4 feet of movement. Furthermore, a creature in the wall’s space must make a DC 15 Dexterity saving throw once each round it’s in contact with the wall, taking 18 (4d8) piercing damage on a failed save, or half as much damage on a successful one. Each 10-foot section of wall has AC 5, 15 hit points, vulnerability to fire damage, resistance to bludgeoning and piercing damage, and immunity to psychic damage. The wall sinks back into the ground when the dragon uses this lair action again or when the dragon dies.
  • Magical fog billows around one creature the dragon can see within 120 feet of it. The creature must succeed on a DC 15 Wisdom saving throw or be charmed by the dragon until initiative count 20 on the next round.
The lair actions are the only part that's actually actionable content that's ready to use. They're kinda cool. However, I have a few issues with it:
  • They're lair actions. These are actions a dragon has access to while in its lair. I could ignore that, and have him sprout roots out of the ground in the village he's attacking, but they're still separated from the stat block and presented as effects available because the dragon is in its lair.
  • In my opinion, they're not that interesting.
    • The first one creates difficult terrain and forces people to make strength throws or be restrained. It also breaks then the dragon uses another lair action, which it has too, because it cannot use the same one twice in a row.
    • It creates a wall that hurts and slows creatures trying to go through it. Same problem, when the dragon uses it, he either keeps it and does not uses the other abilities or the walls disappear.
    • There's no much to say. I love charm effects. It's a pretty simple ability that could have easily been in the stat block.
  • Finally, these lair actions are independent of the stat blocks. I've never, in any of my years of D&D, fought an ancient dragon. I don't know anyone that did either. The young and adult versions are most likely what the players will deal with. But the DCs, damage dices, hit points and all that jazzed are fixed. I'm not sure how well they scale with different level of players.

Now, all that is on top of what your green dragon can do (the state block). So let's take a look at... let's say an adult one. It has:
  • It can bite.
  • It can claw.
  • It can hit with its tail.
  • It has poison breath.
  • It can frighten everyone around him. If the player succeeds at his DC, he becomes immune to this ability.
  • Legendary: It can make a perception check.
  • Legendary: It can make a sudden tail attack.
  • Legendary: It makes a wing attack that damages everyone around him and possibly knock them prone.
I won't comment too much on the legendary actions, because I like their concept and what they do. Two of them seems really boring, but they're not meant to be the dragon main actions, but something he does on top of his regular actions.

But out of the actions it can do are three pretty boring melee attacks with slightly different parameters (bite does more damage, claw is a worse bite, and tail has more range). But the only interesting things to me are its poison breath which every dragon has, but with a different damage type, and a different condition. The frighten ability your dragon will most likely use once. And then one legendary ability that's actually interesting. You can certainly build a decent encounter with that.

Now, if you move to a young green dragon, which you're most likely to encounter in a campaign of D&D, you lose the legendary actions and the frighten. It doesn't have a tail attack. So you're left with bite, claw and a poison breath every 3 turns on average. Considering the average duration of a D&D encounter, that's not going to be a very exciting encounter.

So, I don't think dragons make terrible encounters. Not worse than other type of monsters. But I'm always more excited to use them as social encounters, or more excited by the anticipation of fighting one, of moving through the landscape surrounding its lair, dropping clues. And then you have the encounter, and it kind of fizzles out.

And if you go look at a blue dragon of the same age (young, or adult), they literally have the same abilities, except their breath has a different damage type. All the flavor is kind of cool and makes the different dragons pretty distinct. But once I get to the encounter, I could swap a blue dragon for a green dragon mid fight and it probably wouldn't make a different in how the encounter goes.
 

teitan

Legend
First, it’s not Dragonlance. Nothing in the UA indicated Dragonlance except a spell name checking Fizban. Does that mean we won’t get DL stuff in it like Draconians? Nope buts it not Dragonlance. If anything it will be Fizban’s Draconomicon or something like that to namecheck the setting like Volo and Mordenkainen but not explicitly a Dragonlance book.

second… there is a lot of 4e in 5e’s design in more disguised form from the short rest/long rest divide, abilities based on short rest vs long rest, at will cantrips, Dragonborn and Warlocks have more in common with their 4e design than the 3.5 counterparts, a lot of the lore changes have ported over in some way and many others. So it’s not a nostalgia grab so much as evergreen like the Transformers Generations line or GI Joe Classified. It’s a design intended to appeal to a broad audience but also pull D&D out of some of its outdated ideas that didn’t live up to the expectation while providing ample optional rules to emulate the lethality of older editions.
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
I hadn't planned on doing a deep dive. But sure.

All relevant information. As I said, very useful to know what clues to give your players, what the dragon looks like, the type of places it lives. I'm happy they include this information, but this has no effect on combat.

Yes it does. It literally sets the stage where combat occurs, and how the dragon behaves.
Once again, great stuff. I love the regional effects. They're great to inspire skill challenges, clues and the environment the players must traverse to get to the dragon. But these don't make my encounter more interesting. I guess I could sprinkle some thicket from the first effect around my encounter area? That could have an effect and maybe force some tactical decisions. So very flavorful, but has no effect on the whole bag of HP thing.


For the third time, I love all of this. I can think of a great social encounter before a potential fight. It gives you ideas for the personality of the dragon. Or maybe my players can try and reason with the dragon during the encounter to stop the fight. But overall, as you said it yourself, it's flavor. It has very little effect on the actual combat encounter.

How a monster behaves, thinks, and reacts absolutely has an impact to the combat encounter. you even admit it could possibly change the encounter from an assumed combat one, to a social one. If you don't think how a monster reacts or behaves impacts the encounter at all, then we play D&D in very different ways. That is the driving factor into how combat evolves, and not something in a stat block.
 

dave2008

Legend
First I want to agree that the dragons in the MM are pretty boringly similar (that is why I have redesigned them several times). However, in actually play the lair actions are quite fun (I haven't run a green dragon though). I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss using them (particularly outside the lair like I do).
  • Finally, these lair actions are independent of the stat blocks. I've never, in any of my years of D&D, fought an ancient dragon. I don't know anyone that did either. The young and adult versions are most likely what the players will deal with. But the DCs, damage dices, hit points and all that jazzed are fixed. I'm not sure how well they scale with different level of players.
I find that crazy. I never have players interact with young dragons, and very rarely adult dragons. For me it is typically ancient dragons at a min. (I've made stats for wyrm and great wyrm versions).
 

TheAlkaizer

Game Designer
First I want to agree that the dragons in the MM are pretty boringly similar (that is why I have redesigned them several times). However, in actually play the lair actions are quite fun (I haven't run a green dragon though). I wouldn't be so quick to dismiss using them (particularly outside the lair like I do).

I find that crazy. I never have players interact with young dragons, and very rarely adult dragons. For me it is typically ancient dragons at a min. (I've made stats for wyrm and great wyrm versions).
I agree. The reason I like the lair actions is that it works well with the regional effects to telegraph the players that moving into the monster's lair is even more dangerous than just facing it outright. It's a great way to create buildup.

My comment regarding the ancient dragons is simply before in my experience, not many campaigns make it to the high levels required to fight ancient dragons. I wish they did!
 

dave2008

Legend
My comment regarding the ancient dragons is simply before in my experience, not many campaigns make it to the high levels required to fight ancient dragons. I wish they did!
That thing about 5e is that you only need to about lvl 12-15 to think about taking on some ancient dragons, and I am never afraid to throw in a monster the PCs can't beat! ;)
 

TheAlkaizer

Game Designer
That thing about 5e is that you only need to about lvl 12-15 to think about taking on some ancient dragons, and I am never afraid to throw in a monster the PCs can't beat! ;)
I honestly have no idea what level are required to fight what challenge ratings in 5E. It's always a guessing game. You might just have doomed my players to fight some much tougher monsters in the upcoming months! :ROFLMAO:
 

Yaarel

Mind Mage
Draconomicon would have the psionic gem dragons in it, who have been mentioned occasionally.

By extension, the book might include setting lore, describing or resembling the Council of Wyrms.
 

Draconomicon would have the psionic gem dragons in it, who have been mentioned occasionally.

By extension, the book might include setting lore, describing or resembling the Council of Wyrms.
Sounds good to me. They could include variant special abilities to spice up the dragons in the Monster Manual if they wanted.
 

jgsugden

Legend
While it would be a fine book, my priorities for a new book would be:

  • Epic Level Handbook (Levels 21 to 30)
  • Psionics Handbook (Psions, Psychic Warriors, real Psionics rules, etc...)
  • Planejammer
  • Dark Sun Setting
  • The Dungeon Master Training Manual (techniques and lessons to help DMs improve their games - acting, organization, advice for handling common difficult situations, Session 0, etc...)
 

Guessing the title will be ASHARDALON'S CODEX OF DRAGONS
Perhaps swapping out Codex for Tome, Book, Libram, Collection or something

Expect it will be more like VOLO'S GUIDE or MORDENKAINEN'S TOME. Half lore and half new options
Give each of the 10 type of dragon 4 pages with a full-page being a sample lair. That's 40 pages
15 pages each on kobolds, dragonborn, and maybe another random monster type. (like MT detailes gnomes and halflings.) 85 pages so far
Another 15 pages on the subclasses and altered races and you have 100

Then new monsters, including gem dragons
But mostly just a grab bad of new monsters
 


Azzy

KMF DM
If I had to guess, I wouldn't bet on a third setting book this year. We have two adventures and two settings so far. I think it's likely a rules supplement.
I agree. I think we'll get a DL book, but it most likely won't be this year (as per your reasoning).
 



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