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5E Mythic Odysseys of Theros on DNDBeyhond

cbwjm

Hero
FYI, there are now 24 Theros based products available on DMsGuild: MOoT on DMsGuild, included supplements to use the mana colors.
Every time I see a product that introduces using the colours of magic for spells, they always seem to ignore the various effects assigned to the colours. The Tap Untap Burn supplement for instance assigns cure wounds to green when it should really be white (or perhaps white and green, both have healing effects) and they have moved earth type spells which should be red over to green as well. I'm sure they did it to spread spells out over the colours a bit more but it just seems to me that they've missed the point of the established colour system and what each colour represents.
 

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Dire Bare

Legend
Supporter
Every time I see a product that introduces using the colours of magic for spells, they always seem to ignore the various effects assigned to the colours. The Tap Untap Burn supplement for instance assigns cure wounds to green when it should really be white (or perhaps white and green, both have healing effects) and they have moved earth type spells which should be red over to green as well. I'm sure they did it to spread spells out over the colours a bit more but it just seems to me that they've missed the point of the established colour system and what each colour represents.
Likewise. I haven't seen a color-wheel based magic system yet that models the card game well. I think WotC's decision to effectively ignore the color wheel in their D&D/Magic crossovers is the best choice yet. It's been a while since I've read any Magic lore (novels, webstories), but I'm pretty sure the idea of a "blue mage" isn't really supported in the fiction either. Which mana colors each Planeswalker or magic-user has affinity towards seems to be behind-the-scenes type of stuff rather than explicitly the way characters see magic in-universe.
 

cbwjm

Hero
Likewise. I haven't seen a color-wheel based magic system yet that models the card game well. I think WotC's decision to effectively ignore the color wheel in their D&D/Magic crossovers is the best choice yet. It's been a while since I've read any Magic lore (novels, webstories), but I'm pretty sure the idea of a "blue mage" isn't really supported in the fiction either. Which mana colors each Planeswalker or magic-user has affinity towards seems to be behind-the-scenes type of stuff rather than explicitly the way characters see magic in-universe.
True that, when I think about the various spellcasters in MtG most/all of them seem to focus on a type of magic which happens to fall into a certain colour. Jace deals in mental powers which falls under blue, Chandra has pyromancy which falls under red, etc. Seems more like the character's type of spells come first which informs the mana colour rather than the other way round.
 

Ash Mantle

Adventurer
I've been reading this book little by little, as work is mainly occupying, but I'm finding the writing in this book to be really evocative and glorious in its imagery and composition.
 

Burnside

Space Jam Confirmed
The entire 5E product line seems to be premised on DM's being the target audience, or converting anyone who buys the books into a DM.
Legit question: do people who ONLY play and NEVER DM actually buy anything? I’ve DMed for maybe 100 players over the past three years and the ones that never DM themselves for the most part spend no money on D&D. Occasionally they might get a Heroforge mini of their character or buy a D&D-related gift for the DM, or some dice, but that’s about it. I’ve literally never known any to have bought one of the books.
 

Parmandur

Legend
Legit question: do people who ONLY play and NEVER DM actually buy anything? I’ve DMed for maybe 100 players over the past three years and the ones that never DM themselves for the most part spend no money on D&D. Occasionally they might get a Heroforge mini of their character or buy a D&D-related gift for the DM, or some dice, but that’s about it. I’ve literally never known any to have bought one of the books.
I think that matches with what WotC has said about the demographics of buying, but certainly some people do only play and still buy books. Bit they are enough of a minority that WotC is not tailoring any products for that audience in 5E. Seriously, not a single product in 6 years. But it is still a megasuccess in sales....
 

Legit question: do people who ONLY play and NEVER DM actually buy anything? I’ve DMed for maybe 100 players over the past three years and the ones that never DM themselves for the most part spend no money on D&D. Occasionally they might get a Heroforge mini of their character or buy a D&D-related gift for the DM, or some dice, but that’s about it. I’ve literally never known any to have bought one of the books.
Most players seem to own a PHB and possibly Xanathar's, depending on finances. I know of one who buys setting books if that setting is going to be used in a campaign.
 

Nikosandros

Golden Procrastinator
Legit question: do people who ONLY play and NEVER DM actually buy anything? I’ve DMed for maybe 100 players over the past three years and the ones that never DM themselves for the most part spend no money on D&D. Occasionally they might get a Heroforge mini of their character or buy a D&D-related gift for the DM, or some dice, but that’s about it. I’ve literally never known any to have bought one of the books.
In my two 5e groups, that kind of player buys the PHB.
 

darjr

I crit!
I wonder with the pandemic and explosion of online play how many players are buying more? Especially with DNDBeyond and it’s tools integrating with discord and such.
 

Burnside

Space Jam Confirmed
I wonder with the pandemic and explosion of online play how many players are buying more? Especially with DNDBeyond and it’s tools integrating with discord and such.
If anything, it has made my players buy less, since DNDBeyond has expanded the number of people you can share content with during the pandemic. However, I am sure that DNDBeyond, Roll20, and Fantasy Grounds are booming right now - due to DMs buying content.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Yup, like I said, it's a great concept......of course, you could just give them twice as many hit points. And, I appreciate the 4e words :)
I disagree. Giving them twice the hit points would feel completely different and seriously detract from the fun. After the transformation, it’s like a new, harder, fight with no rest in between. That’s very different from just a longer fight.

I agree they coulda done more, like give the mythic an aura that activates after it transforms, or more stuff like the krakens hearts where you have to target specific things to kill the creature, etc, but I think it’s off base to say it’s the same as doubling the HP.
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
However, I am sure that DNDBeyond, Roll20, and Fantasy Grounds are booming right now - due to DMs buying content.
Not just DMs. Not all groups, and I’d wager not even a strong majority, have someone in the group with a master subscription. A lot of players also don’t have a single stable group, but rather a few groups or an online community pool of players and DMs to build games with.
 


darjr

I crit!
Also there is a chance that the monster won’t go mythic. So the players do have a moment where they may not be sure. Will they? Won’t they?
 


dave2008

Legend
I’d definitely give that a look. Especially if it also updated things like Fey and vampires and werewolves.

And Strahd, maybe?
It only updated monsters with legendary actions (since that is what mythic actions key off of). It is more difficult to add mythic traits / actions to non-legendary monsters, but I'm working on it
 


doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
It doesn't. You can see most of the entire book in the full preview.
It only updated monsters with legendary actions (since that is what mythic actions key off of). It is more difficult to add mythic traits / actions to non-legendary monsters, but I'm working on it
I wasn’t referring to the dmsguild product. I was replying directly to the idea of a new product that reviews and fixes those expansions, and suggesting that it’s be cool if such a product took the idea further than the existing product does.
 

dave2008

Legend
I wasn’t referring to the dmsguild product. I was replying directly to the idea of a new product that reviews and fixes those expansions, and suggesting that it’s be cool if such a product took the idea further than the existing product does.
OK, the hypothetical product I talked about? If so, I started the 5e Mythic Monster Updates to do just that. I just don't have a lot of time to work on it at the moment. I think I will call monsters that aren't really "mythic" paragon and use a watered down version of the mythic rules. I can definitely add werewolves and vampires to that list.
 
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Eyes of Nine

Everything's Fine
Legit question: do people who ONLY play and NEVER DM actually buy anything? I’ve DMed for maybe 100 players over the past three years and the ones that never DM themselves for the most part spend no money on D&D. Occasionally they might get a Heroforge mini of their character or buy a D&D-related gift for the DM, or some dice, but that’s about it. I’ve literally never known any to have bought one of the books.
Most of my adult players buy a PHB, and maybe a XGE. My college age players - well there's a reason I have 2 PHBs. They use the extra.
 

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