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5E New Eberron Book Details From WotC

WotC’s Jeremy Crawford appeared on Twitch last night with Bart Carroll, discussing the upcoming D&D setting book Eberron: Rising from the Last War. Lots of details within!

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- Overview of Eberron, emphasized potentials for adventure and post-WWI pulp style of setting.

- Dragonmarked Houses as fantasy Corporations, playable Dragonmarked characters as race rules in the book

- Rules and stories for playing, Warforged, Changlings, Kalsthar, Shifters, Goblins, Hobgoblins, Bugbears, Orcs. Playable Orc is different fro mthe Volo's Guide rules to reflect the different story (no intelligence malus, few other tweaks, still usable for other worlds, these are PC Orcs as opposed to Monster Manual Orcs like Volo's).

- Full rules for the Artificer, including a new feature in this book for making Common and Uncommon magic items

- Aberrant Dragonmark Feats are in the book

- Group patron rules for organizations the late 19th-early 20th century style: newspapers, criminal syndicates, universities, spy rings: fourth choice after Race-Class-Background that the party makes together, has new fluff background features to give characters and adventure hooks

- Possibility of the party becoming their own patron, example being creating your own Crime Syndicate

- All of the above is Chapter 1 material

- Chapter 2 is a Gazeeter of Korvaire and the world: delves into great nations, the religions, touches on otehr continents

- Chapter 3 is a zoom in on Sharn, a microcosm of the setting, great place for Noir intrigue

- Chapter 4 is a 100 page adventure creation toolkit comparable to Guildmaster's Guide to Ravnica: wealth of adventure building tables, maps, organization information, first level adventure set in Sharn. Reveals brand new information about the Mournland, for instance, during the war they created not just regular Warforged and Warforged Titans but also Warforged Colossi the size of skyscrapers: one of the maps is of a fallen Warfored Colossi as a dungeon @doctorbadwolf

- Section in "massive" chapter for creating adventures about Eberron's cosmology, and how it relates to Great Wheel multiverse, left to DM to decide how sealed off Eberron is by the Progenitor Dragons

- There are extended magical item economy rules in chapter 5, Common magical items are plentiful: buying, selling, crafting rules and price lists.

- Eberron specific monsters and NPCs in the sixth and final chapter, covering things like Daelkyr, Living Spells (3 different Living Spells in the book including Living Cloud Kill, and a template for making more) and various specific NPCs

 
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Comments

R_J_K75

Explorer
"every home game is their own,"
I've long since stopped following FR canon or the timeline. My players dont care and its really allowed me to do alot of fun stuff. For instance, all the uber-powerful NPCs no longer exist and Waterdeep is now LE ruled by a single tyrant. Id say I made Waterdeep my own.

Im seriously considering running an Eberron campaign once my current game finishes. My players have a spelljamming helm and will travel. This new iteration has me excited to see what they do with the setting in 5E.
 

Arnwolf666

Explorer
I looked at Eberron cosmology and saw it as just a renaming of planes with a different metaphorical structure. I also always looked at all history as just the authors perspective or research that may or may not be correct. I liked the ending of a forgotten realms novel I once read where khelben blackstaff said he wrote books that were wrong deliberately to just confuse people of what really happened. I like regional perspectives.
 

Reynard

Adventurer
I looked at Eberron cosmology and saw it as just a renaming of planes with a different metaphorical structure. I also always looked at all history as just the authors perspective or research that may or may not be correct. I liked the ending of a forgotten realms novel I once read where khelben blackstaff said he wrote books that were wrong deliberately to just confuse people of what really happened. I like regional perspectives.
I would suggest that your "looking at" those things wasn't actually "reading and absorbing" those things. This isn't unique to Eberron by any stretch, but the setting was conceived with particular goals in mind and so things like the history and cosmology and the "physics" of the setting were designed specifically to support those goals without concern about what the wider D&D worlds looked like. Saying that the planes are just renamed Great Wheel planes only serves to show you weren't paying attention.
 

doctorbadwolf

Adventurer
I looked at Eberron cosmology and saw it as just a renaming of planes with a different metaphorical structure. I also always looked at all history as just the authors perspective or research that may or may not be correct. I liked the ending of a forgotten realms novel I once read where khelben blackstaff said he wrote books that were wrong deliberately to just confuse people of what really happened. I like regional perspectives.
That’s fine if you get good inspiration from that, but it doesn’t reflect the setting at all.

The planes of Eberron are not the planes of Abeir-Toril, by any stretch of the imagination.
 

R_J_K75

Explorer
Saying that the planes are just renamed Great Wheel planes only serves to show you weren't paying attention.
Honestly pretty easy not to make the connection, I didnt until someone mentioned it here. I wanted to play in Eberron/Khorvaire back when the new setting came out and wasnt concerned about the cosmology because I had no intention of taking the game outside of the continent. so, I too kind of glossed over that chapter too. Looking at it from the an inhabitant of that material plane I would guess a very small segment of the population would have anymore than a rudimentary understanding of the cosmology. That knowledge probably only common to scholars, and even then those who research such subjects.
 

Ash Mantle

Explorer
Speaking of Eberron's cosmology, Keith Baker has a new personal project coming out (initially named as Project Raptor), called Exploring Eberron.

https://manifest.zone/kb-presents-project-raptor/

He'll be delving into the planes of Eberron (and its unique set up), as well as into topics which he personally finds interesting, that'll be the faiths of Eberron, as well as the oceans of Eberron and what lies beneath them. Other details'll likely come out closer to the product's publication date.

Apparently this comes out in December on DMsGuild. It'll probably be an excellent companion to Eberron: Rising from the Last War.
 

Reynard

Adventurer
Honestly pretty easy not to make the connection, I didnt until someone mentioned it here. I wanted to play in Eberron/Khorvaire back when the new setting came out and wasnt concerned about the cosmology because I had no intention of taking the game outside of the continent. so, I too kind of glossed over that chapter too. Looking at it from the an inhabitant of that material plane I would guess a very small segment of the population would have anymore than a rudimentary understanding of the cosmology. That knowledge probably only common to scholars, and even then those who research such subjects.
Specific knowledge sure but people wouldn't say the elemental plane of fire, they would say Fernia. They wouldn't say The Feywild, they would say Thelanis. The folklore and literature would reflect the specifics of their cosmology in the same way the Westerners on earth have told stories about Purgatory and about meeting the devil at a crossroads. These details make a world feel real and unique. A GM should at least be familiar with them even if they aren't planning on planehopping.
 

R_J_K75

Explorer
These details make a world feel real and unique. A GM should at least be familiar with them even if they aren't planning on planehopping.
I agree that the small details are sometimes what make a setting unique, other times including them adds nothing. It all depends on what type of game you as a DM wish to run and what your players want out of it. Therefore what I and my players consider details worth including may not be what the next DM or players would. Ive run games where I included "unnecessary" details to try and give the world a sense of "realness" only for my players tell me they werent interested and just wanted to get on with the adventure at hand. From there I learned to prep for whats relevant to my upcoming game rather than some obscure question that may or may not be asked. Even if a player does ask me a question chances are they dont know the answer and will believe whatever I tell them. That comes from knowing what type of players Im running the game for.
 

Reynard

Adventurer
I agree that the small details are sometimes what make a setting unique, other times including them adds nothing. It all depends on what type of game you as a DM wish to run and what your players want out of it. Therefore what I and my players consider details worth including may not be what the next DM or players would. Ive run games where I included "unnecessary" details to try and give the world a sense of "realness" only for my players tell me they werent interested and just wanted to get on with the adventure at hand. From there I learned to prep for whats relevant to my upcoming game rather than some obscure question that may or may not be asked. Even if a player does ask me a question chances are they dont know the answer and will believe whatever I tell them. That comes from knowing what type of players Im running the game for.
That's not really my point. My point is even when the players don't care about the difference, the NPCs should be saying "Thank the Silver Flame!" instead of "Thank Mystra" or whatever, and when that demon crawls out of the Pit it should not be crawling out of the Nine Hells. The lore built into a world has value even if it is entirely tertiary to smashing monsters in the face and looting the corpses.
 

R_J_K75

Explorer
That's not really my point. My point is even when the players don't care about the difference, the NPCs should be saying "Thank the Silver Flame!" instead of "Thank Mystra" or whatever, and when that demon crawls out of the Pit it should not be crawling out of the Nine Hells. The lore built into a world has value even if it is entirely tertiary to smashing monsters in the face and looting the corpses.
I agree when put in that perspective. I prefer to pick and choose my battles these days regarding when to when to roleplay/add certain details and when not to, if theres value added then I will.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
I would suggest that your "looking at" those things wasn't actually "reading and absorbing" those things.

In the future, please address the content of the post, rather than attack the person posting. This is making the discussion about the people, rather than about Eberron, and will tend to make this into an ego-clash, rather than a reasonable discussion.

Any questions, please take them to PM. Thanks.
 

doctorhook

Adventurer
So do we know who the big giant head on the cover is supposed to represent yet? In an earlier thread, some folks were chirping that he or she is an important NPC from the adventure, but (aside from a dominant NPC being inappropriate for Eberron) it’s clear now that the book only contains a tiny adventure anyway. Your move, head-worshippers.

I looked at Eberron cosmology and saw it as just a renaming of planes with a different metaphorical structure.
Some of the planes are similar to Great Wheel planes, but if you think it’s just a reskin of that then I think you missed an important point of the setting: there are exactly 13 planes, no more and no less. It’s an instance of Eberron’s “Baker’s dozen”, which is one of the hidden metaphysical frameworks upon which the setting is built.
 
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gyor

Adventurer
There does seem to be a sharp contradiction between 4e lore and 5e. If you use 4e, Elves are the slave descendants of Eladrin captured by Giants. Unless Eladrin are also the emanation of Corellon. And IMO, I prefer the 3.5/4e story.

I'll admit, I don't see why MToF saw fit to try and create a unified lore across planes. Dark Sun is also pretty darn different, and ... I dunno, in the event I would even try to create a multi-planar campaign, I'd find the parallels between worlds an interesting but unexplained phenomenon. Like how every civilized race in Babylon 5 has their own equivalent to Swedish meatballs.
It make it easier for characters to hope from one setting to another, instead of having settings split their player base
 

Bolares

Explorer
It make it easier for characters to hope from one setting to another, instead of having settings split their player base
I think that the way they are constructing their multiverse in 5e does that job. Hegemonising the lore on races and cultures is not, in my opinion. The most appealing thing about Eberron elves to me is their difference from elves from everywere else, and that includes their origin.
 

Vael

Adventurer
It make it easier for characters to hope from one setting to another, instead of having settings split their player base
Don't get me wrong, I like using common names. But I'd allow each setting to flavour them differently.
Sure, in the Forgotten Realms and I guess Grayhawk, Corellon Larethian is the patron God of the Elves. In Eberron, he's not a god, but a revered hero of the past, one of the first to rise up against the giants, a Spartacus figure. The Valenar, in particular, revere and attempt to emulate his deeds. In Dark Sun, he's more of a fable or mythological figure, a Robin Hood or Odysseus (or darker, maybe Rumpelstiltskin) like trickster from ancient tales.

In each, Corellon is a known name, but each spin the character to fit their own history and place in the world.
 

doctorbadwolf

Adventurer
It make it easier for characters to hope from one setting to another, instead of having settings split their player base
I’ve never seen any evidence at all that suggests that something like elves having different origins, and thus one part of one book not being applicable to a given setting, does anything at all to split the fan base to any degree whatsoever.
I think that the way they are constructing their multiverse in 5e does that job. Hegemonising the lore on races and cultures is not, in my opinion. The most appealing thing about Eberron elves to me is their difference from elves from everywere else, and that includes their origin.
Exactly. It dilutes the story of every race in a given setting if they all have the same multiversal origin.

Don't get me wrong, I like using common names. But I'd allow each setting to flavour them differently.
Sure, in the Forgotten Realms and I guess Grayhawk, Corellon Larethian is the patron God of the Elves. In Eberron, he's not a god, but a revered hero of the past, one of the first to rise up against the giants, a Spartacus figure. The Valenar, in particular, revere and attempt to emulate his deeds. In Dark Sun, he's more of a fable or mythological figure, a Robin Hood or Odysseus (or darker, maybe Rumpelstiltskin) like trickster from ancient tales.

In each, Corellon is a known name, but each spin the character to fit their own history and place in the world.
That’s much more interesting than “elves in Eberron just don’t know their own history.” The history obsessed elves of Eberron. The elves that are more obsessed with the past and preserving its heroes and stories than in any other world in dnd. Those elves...just don’t know their own past?

Okay, mordy. Sure thing.
 

Bolares

Explorer
I’ve never seen any evidence at all that suggests that something like elves having different origins, and thus one part of one book not being applicable to a given setting, does anything at all to split the fan base to any degree whatsoever.
Exactly. It dilutes the story of every race in a given setting if they all have the same multiversal origin.


That’s much more interesting than “elves in Eberron just don’t know their own history.” The history obsessed elves of Eberron. The elves that are more obsessed with the past and preserving its heroes and stories than in any other world in dnd. Those elves...just don’t know their own past?

Okay, mordy. Sure thing.
Maybe every elven culture believes Corellon is their hero... The Thairnadal believe they are an ancient hero and try to emulate them... The Aereni have an undying the claims to be Corellon (or something similar), the vulkoori drow claim they were the first to really connect do vulkoor, the umbragen tell stories of the mighty hero that speraheaded the expedition to khyber... go nuts on it.
 

Vael

Adventurer
Maybe every elven culture believes Corellon is their hero... The Thairnadal believe they are an ancient hero and try to emulate them... The Aereni have an undying the claims to be Corellon (or something similar), the vulkoori drow claim they were the first to really connect do vulkoor, the umbragen tell stories of the mighty hero that speraheaded the expedition to khyber... go nuts on it.
Oooh, I like that. After all, even the Sovereign Host are all known by many names in different cultures. As I said, I like Swedish Meatballs.
 

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