New Spells and Abilities with regards to Leveling Up...

I really don't get the sort of logic behind training in a specific place every level. It doesnt make a lot of sense for a ranger or druid to go back to the city, and for a fighter, you're literally getting on the job training. What, the sorcerer cant manifest new powers randomly except int he designated zip codes?

I could see doing it for special occasions. In particular, 3rd level where you pick your subclass might warrant a montage with your old mentor as you complete the final steps of your apprenticeship.

If they want to avoid the 1-20 in a few months of in-game time, they need to build downtime into the campaign structure. We just skipped 6 months in my game last session while everyone did some research, built their reputation and blew their paycheck carousing.
 

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Saeviomagy

Adventurer
Start having in-character discussions about levelling up and experience points, because that's what this rule infers - characters being aware of their level, and how their level is linked to challenges ("Suddenly Bob, Tina and I feel like we could learn something new if only we could find someone to train us. But not Barry, because he wasn't there for that goblin fight. Maybe we should go look for five goblins to kill before returning to town so that Barry can learn something too"). You should also drop everything and go to town to train regardless of the state of the plot.

Or you could have a discussion with your DM about why he's added this rule, and what he hopes to gain by it before going full passive aggressive.

But seriously - training rules for levelling have always been silly because they don't reflect any form of fiction or real world scenarios.
 

Henry

Autoexreginated
I really don't get the sort of logic behind training in a specific place every level. It doesnt make a lot of sense for a ranger or druid to go back to the city, and for a fighter, you're literally getting on the job training. What, the sorcerer cant manifest new powers randomly except int he designated zip codes?

[MENTION=31506]ehren37[/MENTION] , with your permission I wanna .sig this. :)
 

One of the downsides f this approach, which your GM might not have thought of, is the characters may gain multiple levels at once.

This is bad because the player loses the time to learn the new features *and* the GM loses the time to learn how to run level-appropriate challenges. The idea of levels is that you get a few sessions to learn the new features before the next level and the next features.

As a GM, I would hate having to run level 2 challenges one week and then level 5 challenges the very next week.
 

redrick

First Post
Start having in-character discussions about levelling up and experience points, because that's what this rule infers - characters being aware of their level, and how their level is linked to challenges ("Suddenly Bob, Tina and I feel like we could learn something new if only we could find someone to train us. But not Barry, because he wasn't there for that goblin fight. Maybe we should go look for five goblins to kill before returning to town so that Barry can learn something too"). You should also drop everything and go to town to train regardless of the state of the plot.

Or you could have a discussion with your DM about why he's added this rule, and what he hopes to gain by it before going full passive aggressive.

But seriously - training rules for levelling have always been silly because they don't reflect any form of fiction or real world scenarios.

If I were to use training requirements to level, I would probably allow the training to be completed at any time between level n and level n+1. Less of a "ok, you've got 13,478 xp, so now it's time to go complete your training montage!" and more just needing a number of prerequisites to achieve a new level. A certain amount of xp (eg practicum). A certain amount of "training or instruction" time, where training or instruction could be fulfilled in a number of different ways: working under a mentor or grand master, training your own disciples, researching ancient spells in a great spell library, spending a month living with a family of bears, or what have you.

To the OP, there is a thread here that covers many of the different ideas and approaches to handling level-up in D&D 5e. From the "as the goblin falls to the ground, you reach 5th level!" to the "spend 6 months training to get your next level" approaches. There are lots of different ways to handle it, and, ultimately, it comes down to the DM and the players to decide what kind of game they want to be playing.

Level Up! DING! Fries are done.
 

Ebony Dragon

First Post
I prefer leveling up to be done Diablo 3 style where it is accompanied by a woosh of energy that damages and knocks back all enemies around you, and you immediately go to full health and mana. See if you can get your DM to go for something like this.
 

hoffrg86

Explorer
for arcane casters I always gave the free two spells when they reached a new spell level, and they would have to find/acquire/trade for the rest. worked fine for us. I occasionally had them find spells books or scrolls, once in awhile they could find a traveling wizard selling spells in his book for copy down.
 

SkidAce

Legend
Supporter
I always let them level up, with the accompanying changes to the character, i.e. hp, proficiency etc.

Anything new was Roleplayed on a case by case basis.

Wizard et al, gets a new spell at level up...was studying and researching all the time. Wizard wants more spells...needs to find them.

Fighter learns new ability...was practicing it. Fighter wants new weapon proficiency...find a teacher.


"Most" of the time I only get grumpy if the level up is a totally new class, and there has been no RP building up to it. I would prefer they find a trainer and go through the story for that.


Its more like a guideline than a rule though...
 

the Jester

Legend
If the only way for you to level up to hit a big city, stop everything and go to the big city. Let the plot progress while you get your level up benefits. Do this enough and your DM will see that he either needs to account for leveling up in his planning of the game; or he will realize that requiring training brings in some serious headaches to the game; or he will tell you to suck it up. Regardless, if you make a point of dropping everything to take care of that level up, you will have established an expectation- "once we have the xp, we're GOING TO go take care of that new level".
 


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