D&D 5E No One Plays High Level?


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pogre

Legend
Oh, I've enjoyed @pogre 's photos of their gaming table, and I was struck by their comments "our combats play fast" and "we just wrapped at 19th/20th level" – which AFAICT seem to be exceptional as I've more often heard that combats take longer at higher levels.

The context was they have a very combat-centric fast-and-fun beer-and-pretzels D&D game.

I don't have any context for your high-level games, so no questions right now, but if you'd like to share something on your mind, go ahead!
We're maybe a smidge above beer-and-pretzels, but you hit it on the head otherwise. As for the speed of our games my players know their characters very well and are very conscious about moving through their turns quickly.

They're very efficient and work well together. They love to come up with effective combos with each others' characters. Like I said earlier when I put together high level encounters I usually think - "this could be a TPK." It never is, in fact they often make a mockery of a major encounter at least a couple of times in a campaign.

Over the years of hanging out on these boards I have come to understand we do play very quickly compared to other tables. It's how we enjoy the game and it works for us. We all play differently and that's one of the many cool things about RPGs!
 


Horwath

Legend
Only high level campaign that I played(17th level)
started at 3rd level, was because we had a rule that we level up every other session(6hrs sessions on average)

If you play every other week, that is more than a year worth of campaign.
 

Oofta

Legend
I highly doubt you would have no problems. I am confident that you would.

Familiarity with the game AND Lack of Familiarity with this game are the source of those problem.

What stops those problems is familiarity with the campaigns specific PCs, NPC, Players, and DMs?
When you start at high levels, you are playing with new PCs and NPCs.

PCs and NPCs that no one are familiar with.
PCs and NPCs that have magnitudes more complexity.

4 level 15 PCs that the players and DM have dealt with from level 1 is different from 4 level 15 PCs you're starting Session 1 with.

My friend's level 10 wizard still has burning hands prepared. A spell he never casts anymore.
I don't remind him because he's slow as it is and if he swapped in Silvery Barbs... ugh.

There are many games and activities that require a fair amount of practice, familiarity and expertise. I've had people new to my campaign join at all levels, it takes a few minutes to bring them up to speed. Some people will never live up to other people's standards. If you have an issue with a spell, ban it or don't allow content from that book.

Seem like you're looking for an excuse to create a new "problem" with D&D.
 

If you play from level 1 all the way to level 20 and never significantly update your characters along the way, you won't run into many of these problems.
Hi Minigiant, I am sorry, but could you clarify this statement? I must be dense this morning, but I am having a hard time understanding how anyone who goes from one to twenty doesn't significantly update their character. Thank you.
If you start at a higher level or update your character's features as you level , you will likely run into many of these problems.
The same with this. Doesn't everyone update their character's features as they level?
 

Oofta

Legend
The "problems" are the ones suggested in the video.

Wanting to play new characters is mentioned as one of the problems. Which is more or less the only high level problem which is nearly exclusive to playing from level 1.

I had two people in my last campaign that wanted to play a different PC. In one case because the player just wanted to play something different, in another because the person playing the rogue felt like they were too OP.

It wasn't an issue, there was no disruption to the game, they had no problem playing the PCs. It's a tempest in a teacup.
 

The slowness of turns
I can definitely agree with you that this is a problem, and has been a problem for every RPG I have ever played at high levels. It is a baked in problem for me, and one that cannot be removed (no matter all the suggestions people give). But I will confess, it is not a problem for many. In fact, when I was younger, we liked it having those extremely long combat rounds.

I guess what I am saying is - it is a relative problem.
 

Minigiant

Legend
Supporter
I can definitely agree with you that this is a problem, and has been a problem for every RPG I have ever played at high levels. It is a baked in problem for me, and one that cannot be removed (no matter all the suggestions people give). But I will confess, it is not a problem for many. In fact, when I was younger, we liked it having those extremely long combat rounds.

I guess what I am saying is - it is a relative problem.
I explained how to play it.

I run a high fantasy urban RPG with my family and our turns are FAST.
 

nevin

Hero
I can definitely agree with you that this is a problem, and has been a problem for every RPG I have ever played at high levels. It is a baked in problem for me, and one that cannot be removed (no matter all the suggestions people give). But I will confess, it is not a problem for many. In fact, when I was younger, we liked it having those extremely long combat rounds.

I guess what I am saying is - it is a relative problem.
this sums it up. If the DM and table want it or aren't willing to suffer the imperfect decisions or the hour long turn then it's going to continue.

It is baked in because, spells more abilities and all that but...you don't have to let the party analyze the entire book of spells each round, which is the biggest cause of long rounds I see. B

But some are comfortable with it and the game plays that way if you are willing to do it. Just like most of the "GAME BREAKING" things people bring up on these forums. They are only game breaking for a few. Most tables adapt, or not and move one.
 

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