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Votan

Explorer
Run a campaign, myself.

That is pretty much all that you've got. As an aside, it might also make you more sympathetic to the time saving decisions that the DM makes.

Also, are you in a system with a lot of preparation time? There can be a huge difference between the time burden of Rolemaster or D&D 3.5 and Traveller or BSG. If the DM is time strapped but running an interesting story then maybe a less complex system is an option?
 

Punnuendo

First Post
What do you do when you join a campaign and quickly learn that the DM is absolutely lazy and seems to go out of his way to the bare minimum?


Is the game still fun? A lot of GMs I know and have talked to run fun and interesting games with little if any prep work.

How player-driven is the plot? Are the players and their characters driving things in the game that the GM just reacts to or with said GM not putting in an effort is there just nothing going on?

If the game is still fun and things are still happening in game I wouldn't worry about it. But most likely since you are posting here that isn't what is going on. As the above posters said you could run your own game, find another gaming group, or simply just quit this one. After all if you aren't having fun then what is the point of gaming?

Also, are the other players having a problem with this as well? Maybe as a group you could talk to the GM about it. Or at least have a discussion with them about what everyone expects out of the game and their fellow participants.
 


Are the players and their characters driving things in the game that the GM just reacts to or with said GM not putting in an effort is there just nothing going on?

Rule #1

"This is a written module nothing will deviate us from the path of the written module."

So to answer your question, no the players and their characters are in no way driving the adventure. Everything is going as written in the module and any attempts to think outside the box or push any variation or change is quickly and totally crushed down.
 

The Green Adam

First Post
As stated, is it fun? Are the players and the GM having fun with way?

If the answer is no, have someone else run something or run it yourself. First though, let the guy know. Tell your GM you're not enjoying the game and see if you can come up with a few ways to improve the situation.

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Raven Crowking

First Post
Find a group you are happy with, or run a game yourself.

If you don't want to do that, then do your best to make the game fun, and stop complaining.

Life is too short for games you aren't enjoying.

Life is way too short for complaining about things you aren't willing to change.


RC
 

Rule #1

"This is a written module nothing will deviate us from the path of the written module."

So to answer your question, no the players and their characters are in no way driving the adventure. Everything is going as written in the module and any attempts to think outside the box or push any variation or change is quickly and totally crushed down.

I understand your frustration, but I believe attributing something such as laziness to the GM, may be unfair. This could simply be a matter of his GMing style. He may not be comfortable running things off the cuff, or he may not have the time to prepare material himself. It also could be form a lack of exposure to other GMs (the best way to grow is to participate in other peoples' campaigns and observe how they run games). If you don't like the way he GMs, you should have someone else GM, offer him some constructive criticism or seek another group.

Whatever you do, I would be cautious in how you approach the situation. It may be that your GM is trying his hardest to do a good job. At the end of the day, remember it is only a game and not worth losing friends over. I think being polite and diplomatic is important in these situations. For instance, it isn't neccessary, to tell him you don't like the way he GMs. It may be true that you don't how he runs things. But frame it another way if possible.

If you decide to offer constructive criticism, make sure you tred softly. There is nothing wrong with making the GM aware of your preferences, but sometimes being too direct can come accross as being rude. I've seen this disrupt gaming groups many times. Treat the GMs style, the way you would treat his fashion sense. It is something he can improve over time, but he may also take direct criticism personally. Instead of saying, "you don't know how to dress, don't you understand that shirt makes you look like a loser" say "red is definitely your color my friend, you should wear more red and a little less green." There is still a criticism in the last one, but it is burried in the compliment. When he does something you like, bring it up and compliment it. Then tell him how much of an improvement it is.
 

Rule #1

"This is a written module nothing will deviate us from the path of the written module."

So to answer your question, no the players and their characters are in no way driving the adventure. Everything is going as written in the module and any attempts to think outside the box or push any variation or change is quickly and totally crushed down.

Find out if you are the only one who thinks the game isn't fun. If so, then you must decide if your time would be spent better doing something else.

If most of the players feel like you do then approach the DM tactfully and bring your collective concerns about the game to his attention. His reaction to players not enjoying the game will help you decide what to do next.
 

Raven Crowking

First Post
Just remember the Old West adage: Whoever complains about the meals first becomes the next cook. "These biscuits are burnt on the outside, and raw dough in the middle, but this sure is the way that I like 'em!"

:lol:


RC
 




Celebrim

Legend
What do you do when you join a campaign and quickly learn that the DM is absolutely lazy and seems to go out of his way to the bare minimum?

I've always found that playing a fun character, and talking shop with the DM tends to lead to offers to have you take over the game. Generally, a lazy DM is one that would really prefer to be a player if given the oppurtunity.

I don't think I've ever set out to do that deliberately before, but in your case, that's what I'd advise.
 

NeverCool

First Post
I found long ago that trying to educate anybody, DM or player, on how a game 'should' be run is not only a waste of time, but downright egotistical. If others are enjoying the game, let them have fun and find one that suits you. If others are not enjoying the game, tell the DM and ask if he/she needs some help.

And if the DM refuses to accept that nobody is really enjoying the game, tell them you're leaving for another game, and they can join if they want. Don't do it behind anyone's back, and don't accuse anyone, just provide an alternative, and let people decide.

And I do know that refusing to play in someone's game, especially someone who is running an actually bad game because of inexperience and/or immaturity can make that DM feel betrayed. But no good friend would force you to falsely praise bad work just to please the source (kids excepted. I assume we are talking adults here).
 

the Jester

Legend
Rule #1

"This is a written module nothing will deviate us from the path of the written module."

So to answer your question, no the players and their characters are in no way driving the adventure. Everything is going as written in the module and any attempts to think outside the box or push any variation or change is quickly and totally crushed down.

I hate riding a railroad, and would probably offer to run a game myself.

Then again, I am primarily a dm, and barely take a player's seat at all.
 

Scott DeWar

Prof. Emeritus-Supernatural Events/Countermeasure
Rule #1

"This is a written module nothing will deviate us from the path of the written module."

So to answer your question, no the players and their characters are in no way driving the adventure. Everything is going as written in the module and any attempts to think outside the box or push any variation or change is quickly and totally crushed down.

I hate riding a railroad, and would probably offer to run a game myself.

Then again, I am primarily a dm, and barely take a player's seat at all.

I have tried to play in a game like that (along with my regular dm and another player) and we ended up just going back to the same dm we were with before.

Setting fire as mentioned above, would be interesting and quite entertaining, still would be found socially unacceptable and i would greatly reccomend to not trying it.
 

Engilbrand

First Post
Offer to run. 4e is a blast to run. I happen to be a lazy DM, but I use that to my advantage. It means that I don't really railroad at all. Everything that happens in the game comes from the players deciding where they're going to go and what they're going to do. Most of the biggest things in the game have come from them making comments about something minor. "I want to meet the author of X book series because he must be important" turned into an entire subplot of the game with the author being a sibling. My entire game started with "My character knows one of the 7 Forbidden Dances and wants to learn the rest". Keep in mind that this is basically my first time really DMing. I took that and worked it into a campaign that has been a blast.
Being lazy is OK. Being a crappy DM isn't. I'm not a fan of modules. I ran them a few years ago for a little bit, and they work for people who don't want to really think about things very much or roleplay. (I know that you can throw stuff like that in.) Your DM, though, doesn't seem to understand that people aren't enjoying that. He needs to chuck it to the side. When you say, "My character decides to leave the building" he shouldn't just tell you that you can't. He should come up with something interesting on the fly.
If he doesn't want to do stuff like that, then you should run. If you don't want to run, and you don't want to quit, then you're probably just going to be unhappy.
 

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