• The VOIDRUNNER'S CODEX is coming! Explore new worlds, fight oppressive empires, fend off fearsome aliens, and wield deadly psionics with this comprehensive boxed set expansion for 5E and A5E!

Planescape Planescape Pre-order Page Shows Off The Books!

Take a look at the books, poster map, and DM screen!

You can now pre-order Planescape: Adventures in the Multiverse from D&D Beyond. The set comes out on October 17th.

Scroll down through the comments to see more various peeks at the books!



  • Discover 2 new backgrounds, the Gate Warden & the Planar Philosopher, to build planar characters in the D&D Beyond character builder
  • Channel 7 otherworldly feats, new intriguing magic spells & more powered by planar energies
  • Explore 12 new ascendant factions, each with distinct cosmic ideologies
  • Face over 50 unusual creatures including planar incarnates, hierarch modrons, and time dragons in the Encounter Builder
  • Journey across the Outlands in an adventure for characters levels 3-10 and 17
  • Adds adventure hooks, encounter tables, maps of Sigil and the Outlands & more to your game
This 3 books set comprises:
  • Sigil and the Outlands: a setting book full of planar character options with details on the fantastic City of Doors, descriptions of the Outlands, the gate-towns that lead to the Outer planes, and more
  • Turn of the Fortunes Wheel: an adventure set in Sigil and the Outlands designed for character levels 3-10 with a jump to level 17
  • Morte’s Planar Parade: Follow Morte as he presents over 50 inhabitants of the Outer Plane, including incarnates, hierarch modrons, time dragons, and more with their stats and descriptions


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Parmandur

Book-Friend
This chart is Jakandor erasure.
Just looking into this, Ben Riggs said on Reddit that the actual 90'a accounting document he was given did not have Jakandor. He thinks that it didn't sell well, based on the fact that his source didn't there to include the numbers on the report hlwhen pulling the raw data in the 90's.
 

Whizbang Dustyboots

Gnometown Hero
Just looking into this, Ben Riggs said on Reddit that the actual 90'a accounting document he was given did not have Jakandor. He thinks that it didn't sell well, based on the fact that his source didn't there to include the numbers on the report hlwhen pulling the raw data in the 90's.
The fact that they were willing to extend lines past their intended end date -- including Al'Qadim and Thunder Rift -- suggests that Jakandor, which actually had a book cut from its intended line, sold terribly.

(Which is fine, by the way. I am ironic in my championing of Jakandor, which is a pretty mediocre line, even if the core idea of presenting a conflict from two different sides, each with their own core book, is an interesting one.)
 
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Ok. I feel that the Elemental Planes worked better when they could be discussed and detailed separately, and combining them all together lessened their value to a significant degree, and that more effort would have resulted in a better end product.
I liked the EC, but do like how 5e blended the elemental planes with EC. It actually fit really well with our homebrew cosmology.
 


Whizbang Dustyboots

Gnometown Hero
I liked the EC, but do like how 5e blended the elemental planes with EC. It actually fit really well with our homebrew cosmology.
Both TSR and WotC repeatedly added more to the planes when they thought the end result would be better (or when they were scared of church moms). I think there's still a lot of room for improvement, although we have come a long way from the days when a huge percentage of the multiverse was "go there, die instantly."

There's probably a place for such locations in the multiverse, but they should be special and not constitute large portions of the map.
 

It's been a while, but i seem to recall that most past-edition planar sourcebooks that contained 'go there and die' planes also included some sort of 'planar adaptation' spell that let you largely alleviate or ignore those effects. Which was entirely reasonable in-world, regardless of how pointless it made the concept of hostile planar environments in the first place.
 


Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
Personally, as a player, I think an Adventure is the best way to introduce a setting. I’m not a DM, I’m not going to read a 120+ page setting guide. No thank you!
I agree. It doesn't have to be an adventure put out by WotC, though. The DM is plenty capable of making an adventure to introduce the setting to you and will actually have enough setting material to do that if they don't waste pages on an adventure and actually print setting material.

And WotC can just make an adventure sold separately if they really want to make one for the setting. It's win-win if done that way. We get a solid setting and people who want to run a WotC adventure set in that setting can. As it stands now it's win-lose. It's lose for anyone who wants a solid setting and win for those who want an adventure.
 

I like the elemental monsters, but not any elemental planes. Fire plane is like being within an eternal forest fire where the fuel never runs out, and ordinary sea live is not possible in the water plane. Where the sun light for the algae and plankton? Where the air for the sea mammals and birds? What is the hidrostatic pressure when sea animal live in different spaces?
 

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