• The VOIDRUNNER'S CODEX is coming! Explore new worlds, fight oppressive empires, fend off fearsome aliens, and wield deadly psionics with this comprehensive boxed set expansion for 5E and A5E!

Planescape Planescape Pre-order Page Shows Off The Books!

Take a look at the books, poster map, and DM screen!

You can now pre-order Planescape: Adventures in the Multiverse from D&D Beyond. The set comes out on October 17th.

Scroll down through the comments to see more various peeks at the books!



  • Discover 2 new backgrounds, the Gate Warden & the Planar Philosopher, to build planar characters in the D&D Beyond character builder
  • Channel 7 otherworldly feats, new intriguing magic spells & more powered by planar energies
  • Explore 12 new ascendant factions, each with distinct cosmic ideologies
  • Face over 50 unusual creatures including planar incarnates, hierarch modrons, and time dragons in the Encounter Builder
  • Journey across the Outlands in an adventure for characters levels 3-10 and 17
  • Adds adventure hooks, encounter tables, maps of Sigil and the Outlands & more to your game
This 3 books set comprises:
  • Sigil and the Outlands: a setting book full of planar character options with details on the fantastic City of Doors, descriptions of the Outlands, the gate-towns that lead to the Outer planes, and more
  • Turn of the Fortunes Wheel: an adventure set in Sigil and the Outlands designed for character levels 3-10 with a jump to level 17
  • Morte’s Planar Parade: Follow Morte as he presents over 50 inhabitants of the Outer Plane, including incarnates, hierarch modrons, time dragons, and more with their stats and descriptions


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You aren't complaining about the Great Wheel there, though. You're complaining about single element planes, which can occur with or without a wheel cosmology.

It's pretty easy to have both the Great Wheel AND the Elemental Chaos if you wanted them. The outer planes could be viewed as being in the wheel shape, and the inner planes could be meshed into the elemental chaos.

It's important to remember that none of these cosmologies actually represent the real shape of the multiverse. They are just how individual worlds imagine them to be. The sages of one world envision the outer planes as a circle, and the sages of another as branches of a world tree.
In fact, 5e does have the wheel and the elemental chaos as it’s default cosmology
 

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To be fair, the Elemental Chaos is mentioned as part of the cosmology in the '14 DMG, which by all accounts is still the version WotC is using as they develop all their planar adjacent content.

I may have a personal preference for the old 2e model of the Inner Planes (which, with the para- and quasi-elemental planes and elemental vortices worming all throughout, aren't nearly as "separate" as some might claim) but the "official" 5e model has the four classic elemental planes, quasi-overlapping elemental border regions where one element is dominant but not ubiquitous, and the 4e-style Elemental Chaos all together (minus slaad, demons, and the Abyss, of course), so it's not too surprising that they'd drawn upon it when dealing with an elemental adjacent topic like giant mythology.
 
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Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
In fact, 5e does have the wheel and the elemental chaos as it’s default cosmology
It has the great wheel both inner and outer and also the elemental chaos. If you read the default cosmology on page 43 it says, "The Inner Planes exemplify the physical essence and elemental nature of air, earth, fire, and water. The Elemental Plane of Fire, for example, embodies the essence of fire. The plane's entire substance is suffused with the fundamental nature of fire:..." The picture on page 57 also shows the elemental planes individually. Interestingly, the picture also shows some paraelemental planes which I never realized existed in 5e. You learn something new every day!!

It seems odd that the picture shows the paraelemental planes, but the planar categories from page 43 makes no mention. I wonder if they were supposed to be added or cut and a miscommunication happened.
 
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Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
To be fair, the Elemental Chaos is mentioned as part of the cosmology in the '14 DMG, which by all accounts is still the version WotC is using as they develop all their planar adjacent content.

I may have a personal preference for the old 2e model of the Inner Planes (which, with the para- and quasi-elemental planes and elemental vortices worming all throughout, aren't nearly as "separate" as some might claim) but the "official" 5e model has the four classic elemental planes, quasi-overlapping elemental border regions where one element is dominant but not ubiquitous, and the 4e-style Elemental Chaos all together (minus slaad, demons, and the Abyss, of course), , so it's not too surprising that they'd drawn upon it when dealing with an elemental adjacent topic like giant mythology.
the quasi planes never grabbed at me and I pretty much ignored them. The paraelemental planes, though, I used those and apparently they are in 5e! I see them on the picture in the DMG on page 57.
 

It has the great wheel both inner and outer and also the elemental chaos. If you read the default cosmology on page 43 it says, "The Inner Planes exemplify the physical essence and elemental nature of air, earth, fire, and water. The Elemental Plane of Fire, for example, embodies the essence of fire. The plane's entire substance is suffused with the fundamental nature of fire:..." The picture on page 57 also shows the elemental planes individually. Interestingly, the picture also shows some paraelemental planes which I never realized existed in 5e. You learn something new every day!!

It seems odd that the picture shows the paraelemental planes, but the planar categories from page 43 makes no mention. I wonder if they were supposed to be added or cut and a miscommunication happened.
The areas equivalent to the paraelemental planes are just border regions in 5e, and each is detailed within one of the entries of the four main planes. It's really a distinction without a difference, as they are basically the paraelemental planes of old with minor tweaks.
 

5e cosmology is basically a merger between 2e, 4e, 3e FR. Eberron cosmologies.

From 2e Outer Planes, Inner Planes, Ethereal Plane, Wildspace. 4e Elemental Chaos, Feywild, Shadowfell, Astra Sea, Astral Dominions. All of Eberron's Planes are stuffed into its crystal sphere. The plane of Zigguraxus is mentioned in Erin M. Evans final 5e novel. Who knows we're the border elemental comes from? Not sure what edition came up with the Far Realms.

Who knows what Planescape will add to the cosmology.
 

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