D&D Movie/TV Polygon: Who is Hugh Grant playing in the D&D movie, and is it secretly Dagult Neverember?

Whizbang Dustyboots

100% that gnome

HughGrant.0.png
Who is Hugh Grant playing in the D&D movie, and is it secretly Dagult Neverember?

Polygon said:
One of the movie’s most interesting elements might be Hugh Grant’s character — both who he is and who he isn’t. According to IMDB, he’s “The Rogue.” According to promotional materials for the film, he’s Forge Fitzwilliam, the human Lord of Neverwinter. But Realms lore already has a Lord of Neverwinter, who isn’t named Forge Fitzwilliam. The Lord of Neverwinter is a character with a long, rich history. So why isn’t Hugh Grant playing Dagult Neverember?
The city of Neverwinter glimpsed in the Honor Among Thieves trailer is instantly recognizable to anyone who has been playing in the city at any point since 2011, whether in the tabletop game or the MMO. Lord Neverember is a character who has been inextricably part of the city’s story for 11 years now. So why set the movie there, then replace one of the setting’s core characters with someone else? Especially when Fitzwilliam and Neverember are so similar: Both are former adventurers with shady pasts who amassed great wealth and used it to buy their way into positions of power. Why start from scratch when there is a character who has been familiar to players for more than a decade?
What if Forge Fitzwilliam not only bought his way into politics, but into a whole new identity? We know Dagult Neverember puts a lot of weight on his image, and it’s also been hinted in the past that his claimed connections to the royal line of Neverwinter are false. What if Dagult is an entirely invented identity to cover up his past as Forge? Or perhaps Dagult Neverember is his real self, and Forge Fitzwilliam was the fake. I mean, the name Forge is a little on the nose, isn’t it? Either way, this would fit Forge’s description as a con man and provide the movie with a nice little plot twist.
I've got no dog in this fight, but it does seem interesting that the movie would great a character so similar to an existing one, especially when the existing one doesn't have any obvious radioactive elements that WotC would rather bury somewhere.
 

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Stormonu

Legend
What timeframe is the movie set in? I mean, stretching back to the Spellplague it's been what, a hundred years?

My guess is he's actually Mirt :)
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Yeah, presumably the Lord of Neverwinter isn't immortal - several people have held the position over time.
 




Tales and Chronicles

Jewel of the North, formerly know as vincegetorix
The Alagondar line who held the crown for most of the city's modern history disappeared in 1451 when the city was destroyed by Mageara the Hot-Pocket Titan.

Neverember came under the pretense to pacify and rebuild the city who was the shadow of itself in 1467.

The city in the trailer does not look like a ravaged city.

So it would seem he's a new lord from the most up-to-date lore, or he's a lord from way before the Alagondar, somewhen around the Orcgate and the whole magic war between Thay and Neverwinter.
 




There will never be a time when I don't chuckle and struggle to say "Mount Hotenow" with a straight face.

The Alagondar line who held the crown for most of the city's modern history disappeared in 1451 when the city was destroyed by Mageara the Hot-Pocket Titan.

Neverember came under the pretense to pacify and rebuild the city who was the shadow of itself in 1467.

The city in the trailer does not look like a ravaged city.

So it would seem he's a new lord from the most up-to-date lore, or he's a lord from way before the Alagondar, somewhen around the Orcgate and the whole magic war between Thay and Neverwinter.
 



Whizbang Dustyboots

100% that gnome
In defense of these names, it's not like we don't have worse names for places in the real world. Case in point, "Boner Knob Mountain."
Yeah, that was part of how I leaned into things. The major mountain that the starting barony was based around was "Green Mountain." I just said the locals -- who included a lot of dwarves, for the record -- were a literal bunch.

"That green mountain is Green Mountain. That river with mossy banks is the Moss River. That village by the waterfall that used to be a goblin settlement is Goblin Falls. That range of volcanic mountains that periodically spew hot ash are the Hotash Mountains."
 


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