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Star Trek [+] Star Trek Discovery (Fan) Thread

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Voyager would have needed to harvest raw materials (possibly asteroids) or dedicated some of its own internal structure to be re-processed into shuttle components. The mines might have had a cloaked reserve of spare matter, or had limited quantities of raw materials on board.

Starships have the capability of using a Bussard ramscoop - they deploy a magnetic field to collect interstellar hydrogen.

My understanding (and rationalization) of a starship's fuel lifecycle is as follows:

1) Ship collects interstellar hydrogen.
2) Some of this hydrogen is stored. Some of it is fused to create impulse power. Some of it is fused and the energy used to make antimatter, which is stored.
3) When needed, the stored hydrogen and antimatter are used to fuel the warp core.

If you aren't trying to be stealthy, you can run the ramscoop all the time, and basically never run out of fuel.

This kind of path is absolutely necessary for the operation of any vessel for any significant period of time away from starbases, as otherwise you run out of antimatter, and are stuck.
 

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Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
I wonder what role they're going to have Saru play, if any, going forward.

I think the new uniforms are particularly ugly. Yuck.
 

Mallus

Legend
I wonder what role they're going to have Saru play, if any, going forward.

I think the new uniforms are particularly ugly. Yuck.
I read Dough Jones will definitely be back for season four, so maybe he'll be an admiral or ambassador assigned to Discovery?

Agree about the uniforms. They look fine against the Apple Store aesthetics of Starfleet HQ... not so much against the DISCO sets.
 

Argyle King

Legend
I agree with what some of the others have said about Burnham, but my dislike for the character started back in season 1.

I think the difference between TOS and Discovery is that TOS was based around characters which were compelling and likeable (even when they were flawed); in contrast, Burnham is someone who I find to be generally unlikeable. It rubs me the wrong way when one of the other characters (such as Tilly) gets on the verge of having a breakthrough moment, but then the writing somehow twists it into still being about Burnham.
 

Hussar

Legend
I'm not sure having an arc counts as being "inconsistent". Burnham starts the season after a year away from Star Fleet and is questioning whether or not she wants to come back. She then spends a couple of episodes tying up personal business and being drawn back into her role in Star Fleet. By the end, she's all in and wants to be a part of the family again. Seems pretty straightforward to me.
 

MarkB

Legend
I'm not sure having an arc counts as being "inconsistent". Burnham starts the season after a year away from Star Fleet and is questioning whether or not she wants to come back. She then spends a couple of episodes tying up personal business and being drawn back into her role in Star Fleet. By the end, she's all in and wants to be a part of the family again. Seems pretty straightforward to me.
For me the stumbling block is the bit in the middle where, after having been made First Officer and with the crew in a precarious relationship with the new Starfleet, she disobeys orders and abandons her post to pursue a personal mission.

She's rightly relieved of her duties afterwards, but there's no way she should have been able to come back from that to being entrusted with any command role in the short time between then and the end of the season.
 

Mallus

Legend
Yeah, I didn't find the writing of Burnham inconsistent this season, especially given one of her defining traits is 'impulsiveness'. She's almost as much half-Kzinti as half-Vulcan (this would make her Weeper-to-Animals).

I'm surprisingly okay with Michael ending up in the captain's chair by season's end. I liked the original choice of Saru, but by the time the writers maneuvered him onto a really gentrified-looking Kaminar with Su'Kal, I feel it made the emotional kind of sense that's the kind of sense they use on the show. And the writers also did a fairly good job showing why Michael would be the better captain in a post-Burn galaxy (also why Saru & maybe Tilly should head up the diplomatic core).


I
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
I read Dough Jones will definitely be back for season four, so maybe he'll be an admiral or ambassador assigned to Discovery?

I think there's meat in "Burnham takes the chair, finds it to be a bit too big still, and cedes it when Saru comes back". Tilly becomes #1, and Burnham leads Discovery's "Special Solutions" team.

Agree about the uniforms. They look fine against the Apple Store aesthetics of Starfleet HQ... not so much against the DISCO sets.

Yeah. Plus, they look good for someone trying to look formal, but seem ill suited to getting up to your elbows in plasma conduits or alien slime...
 

Dire Bare

Legend
I think there's meat in "Burnham takes the chair, finds it to be a bit too big still, and cedes it when Saru comes back". Tilly becomes #1, and Burnham leads Discovery's "Special Solutions" team.



Yeah. Plus, they look good for someone trying to look formal, but seem ill suited to getting up to your elbows in plasma conduits or alien slime...
I really hope they don't play yo-yo with Burnham anymore. She's been given the chair, she needs to keep the chair. There can be drama, challenge, and all sorts of sturm-and-drang, but no more musical captains please.

However, your idea of Burnham heading up some sort of special forces team . . . . I had the same thought before the season finale rolled around. It would have allowed her to be the maverick and not be constantly in trouble or at odds with Saru and Starfleet. But then again, that's basically Section 31's role, in dark way, and I think it's time to move on from Secton 31 for a while (and the Mirror Universe while we're at it).

Of course, Star Trek has a history of its captains defying the authority of the admirals, so . . . maybe the captain's chair is the safest place for Burnham! :)
 

Hussar

Legend
To be fair, Kirk disobeyed orders a LOT and still managed to keep the seat. So did Archer. And, well, frankly, every bloody captain. It's a wonder Star Fleet admirals don't all die of cerebral hemorrhages from all the stress. :D

I would add though, that the Trek tradition seems to be holding strong - weak(ish) first season, second season is better and hit their stride by third season. If it holds up, I have very high hopes for the next two or three seasons before the show kerlunks to it's inevitable ending.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
I really hope they don't play yo-yo with Burnham anymore. She's been given the chair, she needs to keep the chair.

I don't see much to suggest she's ready for it. Yes, she's effective... on her own. But she's not shown the self-discipline to allow others to do what must be done, rather than doing it herself.

However, your idea of Burnham heading up some sort of special forces team . . . .
But then again, that's basically Section 31's role, in dark way

I actually phrased it as "Special Solutions" for a reason. There's nothing saying that their action has to be unethical - merely that it is unorthodox and often high risk.

Of course, Star Trek has a history of its captains defying the authority of the admirals, so

Yeah. And... that's a bit of a problem.

The show constantly paints the Federation on the whole as ineffective and incompetent, and often bordering upon being unethical and easy to manipulate to evil ends.

As if that could somehow last nearly a millennium, even surviving galaxy-wide natural disaster?

Just once, I'd have like to see Kirk set out following his gut, and being completely and utterly wrong, and have Spock walk in at the end of the episode, saving the day by following well-considered regulation and well-considered logic, telling him, "Captain, surely you understand that your 'gut' as you call it, is a vestige of a primitive age in which your people needed to make very simple but important decisions quickly. Your predicament here arose because today, problems are rarely simple, and require far more understanding of context and details to work through. The regulations you decided to ignore are a framework of the learning of past Starfleet Captains to give you support to do that. In ignoring that past, you doomed yourself to repeat it." Or something similar.

Having typed all that, I can actually see that as the meat of next season - Burnham learning that being a maverick all the time is a problem, not a solution.
 

Hussar

Legend
I doubt American audiences would buy the notion that authority is actually effective and capable anymore. The "go with your gut" approach to SF is a long historied trope where guts and moxie beat knowledge and intelligence nearly every time.

I seriously doubt that that is going to change anytime soon.
 

Truth Seeker

Adventurer
I doubt American audiences would buy the notion that authority is actually effective and capable anymore. The "go with your gut" approach to SF is a long historied trope where guts and moxie beat knowledge and intelligence nearly every time.

I seriously doubt that that is going to change anytime soon.
As long it is in Secret Hideout hands.... it will not.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
The "go with your gut" approach to SF is a long historied trope where guts and moxie beat knowledge and intelligence nearly every time.

I am well aware. Persistence of this narrative is, however, a bit of a problem at this point. "My gut tells me so, and I trust it more than experts," is in large part behind our current pandemic issues, for example.

Not that I am a proponent of following leaders blindly either. But the balance is rather out of whack, here, and I find it irks me.

Having Vance stick on principle when negotiating with Osyraa is honestly a good thing in that regard. It is possible for a leader to have solid principles they stick to.
 


Erekose

Eternal Champion
To be fair, Kirk disobeyed orders a LOT and still managed to keep the seat. So did Archer. And, well, frankly, every bloody captain. It's a wonder Star Fleet admirals don't all die of cerebral hemorrhages from all the stress. :D

I would add though, that the Trek tradition seems to be holding strong - weak(ish) first season, second season is better and hit their stride by third season. If it holds up, I have very high hopes for the next two or three seasons before the show kerlunks to it's inevitable ending.
I think this a common misconception that to be honest I was also guilty of. In TOS films Kirk is portrayed as defying orders (for a good reason of course) but when I rewatched TOS tv series it’s much more often that Kirk is following Star Fleet orders and the Prime Directive - even if sometimes he follows the spirit of the law rather than the letter of the law (but again that flexibility is all part of the responsibilities of a Star Fleet captain).
 

Mustrum_Ridcully

Adventurer
I think this a common misconception that to be honest I was also guilty of. In TOS films Kirk is portrayed as defying orders (for a good reason of course) but when I rewatched TOS tv series it’s much more often that Kirk is following Star Fleet orders and the Prime Directive - even if sometimes he follows the spirit of the law rather than the letter of the law (but again that flexibility is all part of the responsibilities of a Star Fleet captain).
Not just his responsibilities, but also because contact with Starfleet isn't instantenous. IIRC, In Balance of Terror, it took days or weeks for Starfleet to send a reply back, and he had to make decisions now and then. He had the authority to make such decisions because he was so far way.
His "defying-order" attitude also plays a lot more into the "age" component of the TOS movies. A significant part of his career he was the only one that could make the decisions in the first place, and he doesn't so easily adapt to other people making the decisions for him. But there is also an experience thing on his positive side - he isn't just some hotshot that thinks he knows what's best - he is an experienced Captain that had to rely on his own judgement and that of his officers to make hard decisions.
 

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