• COMING SOON! -- The Awfully Cheerful Engine on Kickstarter! An action comedy RPG inspired by cheerful tabletop games of the 80s! With a foreword by Sandy 'Ghostbusters' Petersen, and VTT support!
log in or register to remove this ad

 

Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game


log in or register to remove this ad

Weird Dave

Explorer
Publisher
4 out of 5 rating for Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game

Another boxed set that does a lot to get people playing, the Beginner Game to FFG's Star Wars: Edge of the Empire is designed to be opened and played right away. You learn the system as you go, and the pregens are varied enough to get players into the Star Wars mood right from the get go. The dice mechanics are wonky at first but begin to flow, and it's enjoyable to "read" the dice results like an old gypsy fortune teller staring at chicken bones - yes, I see that it was my skill, not ability, that won me this task today!
 

Emirikol

Adventurer
3 out of 5 rating for Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game

I enjoyed the WFRP3 system and kind of enjoyed this system, but I don't see the point of using the WFRP dice equivalent if you aren't going to bother to have variable results. It's just funky dice for funky dice sake.- Disliked the Feats/Talent trees - Dislike the removal of special actions that were the highlight of the WFRP3 systemArt was mediocre. Lack of convention support is disappointing..but company is noted for product (love to spend lots of money?) and not external support.
 

Taarkoon

First Post
If you like Star Wars and you are new to RPGs, buy it!

An excellent entry point to RPGs if you have never played one. Otherwise, there is little reason on buying it if you know what a RPG is, go directly to the core book.

I guess there is nearly no one who does not know the Star Wars setting, but just in case I must say: IT IS NOT sci-fi!
I have seen that here they have put it in the Sci-fi genre. No, Star Wars is "futuristic fantasy" or call it different, but no sci-fi.
 
Last edited:

Kettlebriar

Explorer
5 out of 5 rating for Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game

The beginner box comes with a rulebook, maps, dice, and an adventure. If you know for a fact that you are going to be playing Edge of the Empire, you probably shouldnt buy this box and put that money towards the Corebook. If you are wondering if you want to play or how to play (mostly for those new to roleplaying) then this is the product for you. It holds your hand and guides you on how to learn their rules system. In fact, the Rulebook states READ LAST, after the Adventure itself. The Adventure itself step by step teaches players and gamemaster alike the new system. The artwork really sets the mood and the product quality is great. Most of the low reviews for this product are for the same reasons. they are either telling you dont buy because all this info is in the Corebook OR they dont like the unique dice system.
 

jamesmanhattan

First Post
5 out of 5 rating for Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game

For around $20 this comes with everything you need to play. It's a perfect way to try out a ruleset. My friends and I enjoyed it a great deal. It comes with the dice (the most important part!) these cost $12 all on their own. It comes with tokens for players and enemies. It comes with pre-made characters. It comes with play-as-you-go rules, so you don't have to read an entire 250pg rulebook just to try out a system. It comes with some gorgeous battle-maps to play on. It comes with an adventure which is good for about 4-5 hours of play, and is a lot of fun.

The light side:
Open ended written adventures, with multiple avenues to winning. Win through guile or win through shooting. The adventures are the best part of the system, they are well written.
This teaches as you go, so you don't have to read a 250 page rulebook to play.
Wookies, Twi'leks, Smugglers, Blaster Pistols, YT-1300's, Stormtroopers, it's got it all!
The critical successes and failures force the entire table to get creative, coming up with narrative answers to what the dice outcome says.

The dark side:
The dice can be funky and hard to read/add up.
Is it balanced? It's a narrative leaning game, so you don't die, you suffer loss and setbacks to your goals. The story must go on.
 
Last edited:

bjmorga

First Post
5 out of 5 rating for Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game

The Beginner Game for Edge of the Empire provides all you need to get started with your adventures. The rules for the system are already very easy to learn, but the Beginner Game is even more simple. The adventure provided is fun and brisk. Downloadable content via the FFG website allows for a continuation of the adventure presented in the box set and gives two more playable characters. The GM and Player books are written in such a way that anyone could grab this set and play. I've run the adventure in this box set at least five times with different groups, each one finding unique and (more importantly) fun solutions to the situation presented. No one leaves this game without having had a great time.
 

Jan van Leyden

Adventurer
5 out of 5 rating for Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game

The Beginner Set for FFG's Star Wars: Edge of the Empire line provides new gamers attracted by the license as well as old hands without knowledge of the Warhammer 3rd edition game system with an easy introcuction to this game line.

The box contains all a group needs to start playing: a sort-of rulebook, a very structured adventure, four pre-rolled characters, a poster map, some odds&ends, and the dice.

A gaming group can actually start out with the adventure, which takes place were it all began: Tatooine. It starts out with a string of scenes each gradually explaining more and more of the rules. After several such steps it gets less linear and provides the players with some semi-freedom. The adventure ends with some space action, using the limited rules of this set.

The adventure is nothing to write home about, but usefull as an introductory teaching tool. An experienced GM can use the tools given in the set to extend it or react to unexpected actions. FFG offers a free PDF of a second adventure (along with two additional PCs), which happens directly after the one from the set. This second adventure covers much more ground, but thankfully limits itself to the rules elements of the Beginner Set.

The rules themselves are dominated by the special dice delivered with the set. These come in different shapes, colors, and names. All the dice sport symbols instead of numbers or pips. The symbols are defined on the character sheets, and you will be glad about it as they aren't very intuitive.

To resolve a task, a player builds his dice pool based on his attributes, skills, the difficulty of the task, maybe hindrances and so on. Your goal is to get more successes than failures. The system's selling point is that the dice roll may tell you more than this. Maybe you have hit the stormtrooper (more successes than failures), but you weapon jams (disadvantage). Or, on the other hand, you don't hit the guy, but your attack forces him backwards and he stumble across some debris, falling prone.

The rules give you some standard interpretation of such results, but the game shines when you improvise the effect and turn up dramatics and special effects.

The force doesn't play a major role in this game. There's a special force die included, which is only used to generate a number of force points for both the characters and the enemies. The force points are cardboard chits showing a light and a dark side. Both sides of a conflict can use the force for minor advantage, which results in bringing the other side of the force point up. This works only so long, of course, as there are force points avaliable to your side.

I did have fun running a game for my son and some of his friends, but it didn't entice me to invest in the real game. Apart from slim chances to run a real campaign with SW:EotE the thing is darn expensive, and not only due to the rulebooks price. In the confines of the Beginners' game a single set of dice suffices, but when playing a real game, you would need more sets. And one set of dice easily teleports $20 out of your wallet in my neck of the woods. Furthermore, I don't think that I'd be up to the task to provide my players with interesting readings of the dice every few minutes. And when you only use the drab technical interpretations from the rules, the system doesn't really shine anymore.

But why do I award the game 5 stars in this review. I see it as a small scale RPG I will use several times over time, and I'm pretty sure that I can provide players with some successfull, enjoyable sessions. And that's about what a starter set for a RPG can hope to reach.
 
Last edited:

Alphastream

Adventurer
4 out of 5 rating for Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game

This is an excellent boxed set with everything you need to have a (provided) adventure in the world of Star Wars. The components have excellent artistic value and are suitably constructed to be used several times. The adventure has some good information for a new GM and offers a fun experience. Where the game suffered for us was in the rules. The combination of positive and negative die outcomes that need to be constantly accounted for (or converted into certain outcomes) was tiring after a while - especially when compared to games that offer greater storytelling freedom. Against games that offer more certain die-related outcomes this seemed cumbersome, even if it facilitated DM improvisation. We did not end up as fans of the system.
 

Sobran

Idiot Savant
5 out of 5 rating for Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game

This is honestly one of the best starter sets for an RPG ruleset that I have ever seen. A few rules could use a bit of clarification, but this seems to be a problem with even fully released games, so I won't ding them for it.
 

4 out of 5 rating for Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game

Typically, I'm someone who likes crunchy games and a bit of realism, so I went into the idea of a game built around being story and drama driven with some reservations. To my surprise, I was blown away. Edge of The Empire is currently my 2nd favorite rpg. I love that there's never a 'dead roll of the dice.' Even if you fail, most likely, the dice will produce some sort of result. I very easily went from someone who had reservations about the game to someone who has purchased a few books for the system. The artwork was top notch, I like the rules, and I feel the Beginner Game does a good job of explaining how the game works. I also love that Edge of The Empire focuses on parts of the SWs Universe that aren't given a lot of attention in the movies. I love that because there's enough SWs feel there to capture the imagination of the most hardened SWs fanboy while keeping things loose enough and open enough that someone who knows nothing at all about the SWs Universe could sit at the same table and still have fun without feeling as though they're missing out. However, there are a few almost-negatives to note.One thing to point out is that there are a few very minor differences in the rules when you compare the Beginner Game to the later books. Honestly, you're unlikely to notice without close scrutiny, but there are some differences. It's understandable given that the beginner game is an earlier version of the game and a more stripped down version, but it's still something to mention.The spaceship combat could be a little more clear. I understood most of how it worked, but a lot of the people in my group had trouble grasping some of it. I think the game could use more examples of how spaceship combat is supposed to work. I didnt mind the lack of Jedi and Sith at all, but I'm aware that some people may be bothered by that. Personally, I loved having a different focus; it felt a lot like Firefly set in the SWs Universe. However, there was one member of my primary gaming group who was upset about not having access to more force powers. Whether or not this is bothersome to you will depend on what you're looking for.Overall, I was pleasantly surprised by Edge of The Empire. I highly enjoy it. I've even stolen a few of the mechanics for use in other games that I run. For example, I use the force die and the fate token system in the GURPS game that I currently run. There are a lot of ideas in Edge of The Empire which are (in my opinion) cool and easy to port into other systems.
 

El_Fez

First Post
4 out of 5 rating for Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game

I have been gaming in the Star Wars universe since 1989 or thereabouts with the West End Games system. I tried the D20 system that Wizards of the Coast put out a handful of years ago and just didn't like the class system and thought the starship combat was clunky at best. So while one might say that I'm an expert at the D6 system, one also might say that I am very set in my ways. It takes a well written system to turn my head. Fantasy Flight Games may very well have done just that with Star Wars: Edge of the Empire. WHAT YOU GET - The Edge of the Empire Beginners Game comes with two books, several maps and a couple of booklets. There's a four page booklet marked "Read This First" outlining what a Role Playing Game is, a brief overview and an opening yellow words Star Wars scroll. Labeled "Read This Second" is the adventure book containing the game "Escape from Mos Shuuta", detailing the players and their - well, escape from Mos Shuuta. Lastly we get a Rule Book (marked "Read this last") fleshing out the details and concepts not covered in the Adventure book" Also, we get a set of fourteen custom dice made specifically for this game, a two sided map with a YT-1300 on one side and a couple of locations in and around Mos Shuuta on the other, and a handful of tokens with characters and ships on them. Lastly we get four 4-paged books of character sheets - a smuggler, a droid, a wookiee and a bounty hunter - with a couple of upgrades throughout the adventure. THE GAME ENGINE - At its heart, the Fantasy Flight Engine is reasonably simple. The GM assigns difficulty dice (breaking a bicycle padlock = one purple difficulty die while cracking a safe at Fort Knox = four purple difficulty dice) and then perhaps a boost or setback die depending on environmental conditions (You're trying to pick the lock in the dark while stormtroopers are shooting at you = two setback dice, but you slipped a hacking program into the mainframe the day before = one boost die). The player takes their base attribute (in this case, we'll say Three Cunning) in green Ability Dice, upgrade their skill (in this case, one Skullduggery) in yellow Proficiency Dice and combines them in one dice pool. So for this example, the player would roll two green dice, one yellow die, one purple die, two black die and one blue die. If the result comes up more symbols for success than symbols for failure, the player succeeds. If there are more failure symbols, the player doesn't. Simple! There's also the mechanic of Advantage, Threat, Triumph and Despair - it's possible for a player to succeed, but to have a negative outcome, or for a player to fail and have something positive happen. For example, the player picking the lock fails to open the door but generates several Advantage symbols. The door remains shut, but they accidentally shut the door between them and the stormtroopers shooting at them. Or they unlock the door but generate enough Threat symbols that not only do they open their door - but every door in the base, including the stormtrooper barracks just on the other side. It's an interesting dynamic that allows the GM and players to be very creative in interpreting the dice rolls beyond boring "you open the door" moments. THE GAME - As the box says, this is very much an introductory adventure that holds your hand (both player and GM) through the whole "this is a roleplaying game" thing and how the game engine actual works. The Adventure book walks your group through, step by step, starting with a very basic combat and then slowly adding in concepts and game mechanics - how bargaining and interaction with NPCs works, how Destiny Points are used, how a fight with a large crowd of minions works, how a battle with a rival should unfold and finally starship combat. By the time the adventure is over, everyone at the table should be passingly at ease with the game engine. Fantasy Flight Games wisely set the introductory game on Tatooine, a planet that even someone only passingly acquainted with the Star Wars universe should have a good concept of. The bad guy pulling the strings is a Hutt - while not Jabba, should be familiar enough that players don't have to wrestle with "wait - who is that?" and learn the engine at the same time. From Gamorreans to Trandoshans - everything in the game should be recognizable to someone who grew up with the old Kenner action figures ("Oh yeah, the pig guys? I remember them! Bossk? Yeah, he was a badass!") The Rule book covers more ground than the introductory adventure. It includes more about the game engine, ways to creatively interpret the success and failure of the dice rolls, expanding the combat, some of the core games skills and talents, some basic equipment vehicles and starships, plus some non-player characters. THE DARK SIDE - The box that the Beginners Game comes in is flimsy and crap for storing your game components. I found that my tokens were falling out the other end of the box as fast as I put them in. The Adventure contained within is very linear and railroads the players with a very blatant hand. That said, the game is mostly a tool for showcasing the game engine and how to play. As an adventure it's crap, but as a tutorial - it's well done! The rule book is a little light. It doesn't cover the greater Star Wars universe, how to run an extended campaign or even how to build your own characters. But then again, this is the Beginners name and is primarily just a tool for learning how the game engine works with pre-built characters. If you're looking for more depth to the rules, seek out the Edge of the Empire core rule book. THE LIGHT SIDE - The presentation is excellent and everything is written in a clear and concise manner. It only took an evening's worth of play to get my gaming group up to speed on the basics of the engine - and the beginner's game had a LOT to do with that. SUPPLIMENTAL - I should mention that while the canned game is really short and built to be a tutorial, Fantasy Flight Game has released - for free on their web page - a follow-up game called Long Arm of the Hutt. While the this game is still pretty basic and good for beginners to get their feet wet, it's longer, more intricate and a pretty good opportunity to reinforce what you learned in the Beginners Game. Also, available on their web page are two more pre-generated characters. This allows the players a choice of what they'd like to play or allows the GM more characters for a larger overall party. CONCLUSION - The Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game is great jumping on point to the hobby of roleplaying games and a good tutorial for Fantasy Flight Games' take on Star Wars. It holds the hand of the new players, it explains the rules nicely and clearly, and it's a great classic Star Wars adventure that captures the spirit of the movies well to boot. Well recommended for both old school veterans and brand new players alike.
 

alfarobl

Explorer
5 out of 5 rating for Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game

Excellent box for the price comes with Dice and a very good adventure to introduce new players to Star Wars. You could very easily start playing right away... each time you play is different so big replay value. Counters are really nice to have. Only down is cheap quality box, not made to last but contents is high quality, beautiful illustrations. Star Wars feel... quick and nice system for it. Dice pool takes a couple of rolls to get the mechanics. The more you play the more you get used to it, don't decide about it with only one session.
 

Jhaelen

First Post
4 out of 5 rating for Star Wars: Edge of the Empire Beginner Game

Having recently played this introductory adventure with a few of my board gaming partners, I have to say that FFG has done a really excellent job on this one. Despite having had no previous RPG experience, the players had absolutely no difficulty to get into the right spirit. Initially, they were a bit unsure about what they could do, but by giving a good example, they quickly caught on. Interpreting the dice might have been a bit tricky, but since our GM handled most of that, it wasn't a problem. The game material is top-notch and the adventure, while short and simple, provided several memorable encounters that encouraged the use of different skill sets and approaches while teaching the players all relevant aspects of the game rules. If I have a complaint, it's probably that you'll get little use out of the set after the first playthrough. Still, it's great for its price, and may be the best RPG introduction I've seen, yet.
 

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top