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Superman & Lois


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fba827

Adventurer
As an aside, it was hitting some similar story beats that Black Lightning (another show by same production team ) did.... the father who is trying to be a good father and his kids didn’t know his dual identity and the kids start developing powers.
Though I’m finding this writing a bit more grounded ( not intended as a ‘lightning’ not being ‘grounded’ joke but I’ll take it ;)

Though ( to me at least) one of the sons and off as excessively whiny beyond just angst at some points, so I hope that tones down a little but otherwise characters seemed written well for the show
 

Tonguez

A suffusion of yellow
As an aside, it was hitting some similar story beats that Black Lightning (another show by same production team ) did.... the father who is trying to be a good father and his kids didn’t know his dual identity and the kids start developing powers.
Though I’m finding this writing a bit more grounded ( not intended as a ‘lightning’ not being ‘grounded’ joke but I’ll take it ;)

Though ( to me at least) one of the sons and off as excessively whiny beyond just angst at some points, so I hope that tones down a little but otherwise characters seemed written well for the show
Really aside from him being a Family man working through his relationship with powered children I didnt see much similarity between Black Lghtning and this show.

I do agree though that Black Lightning needed to be more grounded, and with due respect to the original comic being based in the slums of Metropolis, the show just had too many ”in the hood” tropes - they even renamed the city Freeland!!

but so as not to rile up Morrus, yes I’m hoping Supes and Lois avoids the CW trap of too much whine
 

hopeless

Explorer
Is it bad I'm hoping they crossover with them so Clark can discuss this with Jeff and they get to compare notes?

Regarding the kryptonite its possible that masked battle suit operator is from a parallel earth so that kryptonite might not be as effective as it would be if they used Kryptonite from this Earth.
 

Truth Seeker

Adventurer
Anti-inclusive content
What does that even mean?

And no, don't define "woke". What about Superman & Lois isn't "woke". Or, what is the wokeness you seem worried about?
Sorry for the delay on getting back, earlier talk was heard online, that a few writers that were let go before the airing, due to poor ideas they wanted to add changes to the story overall, one example was to change the race color of Kent's adoptive parents. Said writer got online after the pilot airing to state their 'grievance' of being let go, and there are issues going on with the show.

Judging from the ratings of late, the opposite shows otherwise. If said former changes were allowed to stay, methinks the reception of the show would have been quite different. So, behind the scenes someone or someones' finally came to their senses to deny this 'woke' business that crept into some shows of late and have been ruining them.

I believe a lot of people who invested into the show, did not want that to happen...
 

Stalker0

Legend
4 episodes in, and I'm liking what I've seen so far. I do appreciate that this is a different take on Superman, he's a bit older and more seasoned, he's an "old married man", but he still has the same family issues anyone has....except he also has to be superman.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
...someone or someones' finally came to their senses to deny this 'woke' business ...

Mod Note:

Dismissing it as "woke business" has no semantic difference from dismissing people for being "SJWs". Please note how this is not acceptable under our terms and rules.

EN World supports inclusivity. If you want to actively reject it, do it on some other social media.
 

Dire Bare

Legend
Supporter
Sorry for the delay on getting back, earlier talk was heard online, that a few writers that were let go before the airing, due to poor ideas they wanted to add changes to the story overall, one example was to change the race color of Kent's adoptive parents. Said writer got online after the pilot airing to state their 'grievance' of being let go, and there are issues going on with the show.

Judging from the ratings of late, the opposite shows otherwise. If said former changes were allowed to stay, methinks the reception of the show would have been quite different. So, behind the scenes someone or someones' finally came to their senses to deny this 'woke' business that crept into some shows of late and have been ruining them.

I believe a lot of people who invested into the show, did not want that to happen...
If the showrunners had changed the race of Martha and Johnathon Kent . . . . it certainly would have created a lot of nerdrage, but also a lot of attention for the show. Not that a new Superman show needs a marketing push . . .

But I would have been down with that. Martha and Johnathon being white is not central to their characters, IMO. And it would have given some interesting space to explore issues that Superman shows haven't in the past. A minority farming family in a very white Kansas rural town, raising a (seemingly) normal white boy who is actually even more "alien" than they are . . . . now I'm wishing they had gone that direction!

Of course, in the show we got, Johnathon has already passed, and Martha passes in the first episode. Race-bending the couple would probably only be worth it if they survive and play major roles in the first season at least. And the focus of "Superman & Lois" is Clark's current family struggles with being a dad and a father, and not batting a 100% on that . . . .

Guess I'm too woke for superhero shows . . . .
 

Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
I thought I said we weren’t having this conversation here. So why are people having this conversation here? Did I stutter? Are you folks seriously going to get a Superman thread closed?

For the last time: drop it. This is not a request.
 

manduck

Explorer
4 episodes in, and I'm liking what I've seen so far. I do appreciate that this is a different take on Superman, he's a bit older and more seasoned, he's an "old married man", but he still has the same family issues anyone has....except he also has to be superman.
I agree. The show does a great job of making the Superman moments heroic and awesome and making the Clark moments human and vulnerable. I also love Lois, who's just not going to be stopped or take any nonsense from anyone. The family dynamic is interesting and genuine. The whole cast is likable and does great. The show does a great job of showing lots of different perspectives on different problems and treating them all with respect. I love the burden Clark has to bear with his different responsibilities pulling him in different directions. Everyone has a valid viewpoint on how he should spend his time and they acknowledge the real emotions that come from what actually happens. It's very well done. I also like that Lois has her own villain to deal with. I was hoping this would be good and it turned out to be great.
 

Stalker0

Legend
I actually like Sam Lane, because while you may not agree with his view point its a very valid concern.

Superman is having to make the balance that all world leaders have to. There is ALWAYS something that Superman could be doing, so every moment spent with his family takes away from another act of heroism he could consider. The difference is that other humans can delegate, even world leaders have others to make decisions for them when they are not available. But the simple truth is....there is no replacement for Superman....there are things that simply put only he can do.

Now ultimately to live a healthy life, Superman has to balance things, not just for his families sake but for his own sanity. But I can respect that Superman withdrawing from his "day job" to focus on family would literally be a possible national security crisis, and that it would cause Sam Lane a huge amount of worry.
 

Davies

Adventurer
Or, as is vastly more likely, having always put his job ahead of any connection to his family, he resents the notion of anyone choosing otherwise, and is motivated entirely by petty jealousy.
 


Dire Bare

Legend
Supporter
I actually like Sam Lane, because while you may not agree with his view point its a very valid concern.

Superman is having to make the balance that all world leaders have to. There is ALWAYS something that Superman could be doing, so every moment spent with his family takes away from another act of heroism he could consider. The difference is that other humans can delegate, even world leaders have others to make decisions for them when they are not available. But the simple truth is....there is no replacement for Superman....there are things that simply put only he can do.

Now ultimately to live a healthy life, Superman has to balance things, not just for his families sake but for his own sanity. But I can respect that Superman withdrawing from his "day job" to focus on family would literally be a possible national security crisis, and that it would cause Sam Lane a huge amount of worry.
Only in a comic-book universe sense . . . in a more realistic world, even someone as powerful as Superman could take some downtime, as there wouldn't be supervillains and alien invasions several times per week.

And there is the unrealism of Superman himself, not just a super-powered being from another world, but one of godlike power. I've only been able to enjoy Superman stories that either tone his powers down a bit, or give him serious drawbacks to deal with. In the current show, besides Superman's struggle to find that work-life balance, he demonstrates to his son how overwhelming being able to hear just about everything going on across the planet all at once can be, and how he learned to deal with it. It was a pretty good explanation of how such a being can hear someone calling for help on the other side of the world, yet not be aware of every problem happening, not being overwhelmed, and needing those super-beepers he gives to family and friends.
 

Stalker0

Legend
Only in a comic-book universe sense . . . in a more realistic world, even someone as powerful as Superman could take some downtime, as there wouldn't be supervillains and alien invasions several times per week.
True, but the reality the show has presented us is that Superman is needed on an almost non-stop basis.
 


hopeless

Explorer
The impression I got is that he tends to react to situations by rushing to the scene, evaluating what's going on and helping out the best he can until he understands enough about the situation to do something about it.
Sort of a superpowered emergency response team except even the military calls him in!
I'm surprised that isn't more of a big deal since if we use Iron Man as an example there are efforts to find their own version so they aren't forced to call him in every time they get in a sticky situation!
 

Dire Bare

Legend
Supporter
True, but the reality the show has presented us is that Superman is needed on an almost non-stop basis.
Well, yes. The entire enterprise is fictional . . .

But the idea presented in the show that Superman is failing the world when he takes a break to be with his family is a poorly constructed one, a false dilemma, IMO. Super hero stories work best when they mirror our world, but with the difference that this one guy has amazing powers . . . I find stories where the setting undergoes an escalation to quickly "jump the shark" so to speak . . .

Superman has amazing powers, that over the decades, become godlike (the writing, not in-universe) and every story arc needs a villain who can challenge Supes . . . and the cool villains never die (Zod, Metallo, etc) we just get more and more of them, and Superman also gets new super-friends . . . until the comic book world is seemingly populated with more costumed super-powered beings than regular people. These stories can be fun with comic-book tongue-in-cheek storytelling, or when exploring advanced humanity through a sci-fi lens . . . but it jars when juxtaposed with more realistic portrayals of the heroes like our man Clark struggling to be a good dad and husband without letting the latest ridiculous supervillain run around unchecked . . .

All, IMO, of course.

There's a reason why, when a new media adaptation of our favorite heroes gets going, it rarely puts us in a world mirroring the modern day comic book universe with absurdly high populations of powered individuals. We usually start off small . . . but overtime, a successful TV show universe (such as the Arrow-verse) starts approaching this problem the comics have had for decades . . . too many supers, too many super-villains, too many aliens, etc . . .

Superman debuted in the already too-crowded Arrow-verse, but has a very grounded story-telling style, much more so than the other shows in the franchise. It jars with the idea that Superman just can't get even a weekend every once in a while without the next only-Superman-can-save-us disaster . . .
 

Dire Bare

Legend
Supporter
Well, yes. The entire enterprise is fictional . . .

But the idea presented in the show that Superman is failing the world when he takes a break to be with his family is a poorly constructed one, a false dilemma, IMO. Super hero stories work best when they mirror our world, but with the difference that this one guy has amazing powers . . . I find stories where the setting undergoes an escalation to quickly "jump the shark" so to speak . . .

Superman has amazing powers, that over the decades, become godlike (the writing, not in-universe) and every story arc needs a villain who can challenge Supes . . . and the cool villains never die (Zod, Metallo, etc) we just get more and more of them, and Superman also gets new super-friends . . . until the comic book world is seemingly populated with more costumed super-powered beings than regular people. These stories can be fun with comic-book tongue-in-cheek storytelling, or when exploring advanced humanity through a sci-fi lens . . . but it jars when juxtaposed with more realistic portrayals of the heroes like our man Clark struggling to be a good dad and husband without letting the latest ridiculous supervillain run around unchecked . . .

All, IMO, of course.

There's a reason why, when a new media adaptation of our favorite heroes gets going, it rarely puts us in a world mirroring the modern day comic book universe with absurdly high populations of powered individuals. We usually start off small . . . but overtime, a successful TV show universe (such as the Arrow-verse) starts approaching this problem the comics have had for decades . . . too many supers, too many super-villains, too many aliens, etc . . .

Superman debuted in the already too-crowded Arrow-verse, but has a very grounded story-telling style, much more so than the other shows in the franchise. It jars with the idea that Superman just can't get even a weekend every once in a while without the next only-Superman-can-save-us disaster . . .
Something I just remembered . . . .

During the run of Supergirl, Clark and Lois take several YEARS to live in Argo City with Kara's mom and the other Kryptonian refugees. Granted, that was before the reality reboot of Crisis, but how did Sam Lane handle THAT! :)
 

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