D&D 5E Take A Peek At Fortune's Wheel Table of Contents

Now that Planescape: Adventures in the Multiverse is imminent, the tables of contents are visible on D&D Beyond. We've already seen the table of contents of the setting books and the bestiary, and now here's the included adventure, Turn of Fortune's Wheel!

Turn of Fortune's Wheel ToC.png


Planescape_Turn_of_Fortune%27s_Wheel_cover.jpeg
 

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Reynard

Legend
I had that issue with the original Planescape boxed set. But now that I am familiar with that, I know "Planescape" means "World of Sigil".
Yeah, I did not realize that. I just assumed it meant galavanting around the planes a la Spelljammer except using portals instead of pirate ships.
 

Quickleaf

Legend
I don't have any historical baggage with the setting, so when it was described as Sigil and the Outlands I believed them. I will also say that when I did a little wiki/google research when they announced the setting, almost all of the information I found about Planescape was about:
  1. Sigil (vast majority of the info): city, factions, history, etc.
  2. The Lady of Pain
  3. Outlands
I really don't remember much info about the planes other than Sigil connected to them all. And maybe the blood war and the modron march have planescape origins?

View attachment 299748
Truth in marketing, right? ;)

For long-term Planescape fans, like me, there's this section in the original box set that was foundational where it laid out "how to handle portals to infinite possibilities" as a progression.

Sigil and the Outlands are repeatedly described as the "campaign base", with the other planes not getting lush descriptions until later products (the 3 boxed sets Planes of Conflict, Planes of Chaos, Planes of Law). Anyhow, in the core box set they give a sample progression for how a GM can control portal access and structure a Planescape campaign: 1st-3rd level = Sigil. 4th-7th level = the Outlands. 8th+ level = The Planes.

I see why, given their page count restrictions & the mandate to include a long adventure, they'd focus on Sigil/the Outlands.

Just my opinion, but I think trying to cram an adventure worth 1/3+ of the pages into a campaign setting project isn't the best approach for WotC encouraging the longevity of their campaign settings. I'm sure it ticks other trademark requirements, marketing pushes, and other boxes. But it's definitely coming at the expense of the long-term usability of the setting itself.
 



I had that issue with the original Planescape boxed set. But now that I am familiar with that, I know "Planescape" means "World of Sigil".
Exactly. There’s enough happening in Sigil and the Outlands to be an entire setting, and the premise is that it connects to all those other planes described in other products. This is where 5E’s weakness shows, because unlike previous editions of D&D, 5E hasn’t actually published very much about what those other planes are like…
 

Reynard

Legend
Exactly. There’s enough happening in Sigil and the Outlands to be an entire setting, and the premise is that it connects to all those other planes described in other products. This is where 5E’s weakness shows, because unlike previous editions of D&D, 5E hasn’t actually published very much about what those other planes are like…
I imagine the assumption is that DMsGuild will fill out the multiverse pretty quickly.
 

5E hasn’t actually published very much about what those other planes are like…
Each plane is a book unto itself - but there has been plenty of stuff published over the years, and most of it is available free of charge.

There is really no need to reprint everything whenever a new edition comes out. (And no profit in it, thanks to Google.)
 
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