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Take A Peek Inside Warhammer 40K: Wrath & Glory!

Cubicle7 has shared some quick peeks at the interior of its upcoming Warhammer 40,000 Roleplay: Wrath & Glory! While they note that this layout isn't 100% final, it does give you an idea of the general look and feel of the book. They also call out the the Cherub in the top right corner of the page, which is used to help navigate the different chapters.











 
Russ Morrissey

Comments

imagineGod

Adventurer
Woohoo! Finally, we get to live the grim dark experience of the 41st Millennium again. Not that our real world is any better these days.
 


Morrus

Well, that was fun
Staff member
Was there already a Wrath & Glory book? Is it a new edition?
Ulisses North America was doing it under license from Games Workshop. About a year ago the license was moved to Cubicle 7 who began work on their own version. Here's the whole story:





 

Mercador

Explorer
Well, that's weird...

I would be curious to know if there's a lot of differences between each version. I still have quite a few Rogue Trader books here but from what I understand, Wrath&Glory was a merge of all 40K game settings.
 

Mercador

Explorer
Thanks for the links Morrus! It feels strange that they use the same exact title as the old version; some folks will do the error of buying not the same edition content.
 

imagineGod

Adventurer
Well, that's weird...

I would be curious to know if there's a lot of differences between each version. I still have quite a few Rogue Trader books here but from what I understand, Wrath&Glory was a merge of all 40K game settings.
The biggest difference is in the dice mechanics.

(a) The original Warhammer 40,000 used a percentile dice system of d100 dice, probably evolved from the original Warhammer Fantasy Role Play.

(b) The new Warhammer 40K uses a dice pool of d6 only, probably, to attract more miniatures player-types who have buckets of d6 dice.

Also, the lore of the new RPG takes place in the Imperium Nihilus with Cadia the planet broken by Abadon the Despoiler and a huge rift tearing the galaxy in two. The part that interests me is what happens to all the latent psykers now that the Blackships cannot easily return to Terra from the dark side of the rift?
 

imagineGod

Adventurer
Clarification here:
When I talk of the original Warhammer 40,000, it is the Fantasy Flight Games version of d100 (the very first version for the purists, was actually just called Rogue Trader by Games Workshop, and I never played it).

The earlier Wrath and Glory was also a d6 dice pool system, but the production values were inferior. I do not know if that prompted Games Workshop to seek new publishers in Cubicle7, but could be, who knows.
 

macd21

Explorer
Well, that's weird...

I would be curious to know if there's a lot of differences between each version. I still have quite a few Rogue Trader books here but from what I understand, Wrath&Glory was a merge of all 40K game settings.
By ‘Rogue Trader’ do you mean the FFG game from a few years back? Because Wrath and Glory is very different.
 



zedturtle

Explorer
What's the differences between the two versions of Wrath & Glory?
The rules are essentially the same. The rulebook has been cleaned up, reorganised and has new graphics and art to get you into the feel of 40k. A few bits and bobs that only appeared in weird places (e.g. on a reference card) have now been integrated into the core rules.

All the Fantasy Flight Games of Warhammer 40,000 were built upon d100 dice mechanics, sort of like all Warhammer Fantasy Role Play excerpt the mutant 3rd Edition.
For clarity's sake, Wrath & Glory was never published by Fantasy Flight and never used the d100 mechanics.
 

Mercador

Explorer
By ‘Rogue Trader’ do you mean the FFG game from a few years back? Because Wrath and Glory is very different.
Yeah, that the ones I have, though it comes from a French editor. I guess it's the translated version of the FFG.
 

Wightbred

Explorer
Including some attributes and skills in the cost of the archetype is a smooth move. Paying for the archetype previously was an annoying for me, as it just seemed like you were paying for the Tier. I’m hoping the previously announced changing archetypes works simply with this change.

Hoping my biggest single concern with the first version is also fixed: weapon damage scaling differently to toughness.

Hoping for a Beta version for comment like Pathfinder. Love this system and would love to help make it awesome.
 


TrippyHippy

Adventurer
Clarification here:
When I talk of the original Warhammer 40,000, it is the Fantasy Flight Games version of d100 (the very first version for the purists, was actually just called Rogue Trader by Games Workshop, and I never played it).

The earlier Wrath and Glory was also a d6 dice pool system, but the production values were inferior. I do not know if that prompted Games Workshop to seek new publishers in Cubicle7, but could be, who knows.
Hold on, this is a bit confused/confusing.

Warhammer 40,000 - Rogue Trader was the name of the original Games Workshop publication for the miniatures game. It was released in 1987 and was significant for becoming largely the game that elevated Games Workshop from being a retail and mail-order business based on importing roleplaying games from America to the UK, into an international juggernaut. They had produced the Warhammer Fantasy miniatures game before, but W40K was different because it was, at this time, mainly a skirmishing game using less miniatures (making it a much easier buy in), while the rules were written in the same manner that a roleplaying game would be written like - heavy on background and lots of evocative art. Some critics felt it actually could have been a roleplaying game, at this stage.

Move forward about 20 years, and Games Workshop decided that they might start producing a few roleplaying games again, based on their immensely successful IPs and commission a new RPG through Black Industries, their publishing arm. This was Dark Heresy, a full blooded roleplaying game that used a percentile system that was similar enough, albeit slightly different, to their long time popular fantasy game, Warhammer Fantasy Role-Play (or WFRP), published in 1986, and also redone in a 2nd edition, with the help of Green Ronin a few years previously.

Dark Heresy sold out on pre-order in a matter of minutes, after establishing plans for two more supporting games targeted as future releases: Rogue Trader and Death Watch. Each game was meant to compliment the others by covering a different aspect of playing in the 40K universe. In Dark Heresy, you played an Inquisitor’s Retinue; Rogue Trader had you playing the eponymous captain and his crew, and in Death Watch you played Space Marines. Rogue Trader was deliberately named here as a throwback/homage to the original Warhammer 40,000 skirmishing miniature game from 1987, although it was actually much more specific about playing a Rogue Trader retinue than the war-game ever was.

Despite selling out and being a huge hit, in rpg terms, Games Workshop decided that roleplaying games weren’t profitable enough for their standards (noting that their miniature games market dwarfs that of RPGs) and decided to close down Black Industries Publishing, literally the next day after Dark Heresy sells out. After some consternation from fans, Fantasy Flight Games steps in to buy the license to continue to publish Warhammer RPGs, including the 40K line. They then publish Dark Heresy, Rogue Trader, Death Watch and extend the line further with Black Crusade (about Chaos cultists) and Only War (about playing Imperial army platoons). They continue to publish for several years, along with a less well received WFRP 3rd edition (which made a large box set of fiddly bits, custom dice and new rules), before dropping the license some time around the point they gained the Star Wars licence instead. They finally published a 2nd edition of Dark Heresy, which was slightly more open than the 1st edition had been, in terms of gameplay.

When the license was dropped by FFG, the German company Ulisses Spiele, decided to take it on instead. They set about making a single new game, Wrath & Glory, rather than the multiple game series, that was more inclusive of all types of character and campaigns from the 40K universe. Some fans were also critical of the previous percentile system, and wanted a more dramatic system. The D6 dice pool system provides this, and some also think it meshes better with the D6 dice pool system used in the miniatures game also.

While the system and premise of the new game was quite well received, the quality of the layout, art and editing of the book fell way short of the high standards found in the previous 40KRP games. Fans complained. Ulisses Spiele dropped their licence in some agreement with Cubicle 7, who already had the WFRP licence. Its taken them a while, but Cubicle 7 have clearly done a lot of work on layout in what could be almost be billed as a second edition of the Wrath & Glory game. Should be a fan favourite.
 
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Stacie GmrGrl

Adventurer
This should be called a Second edition, if only to avoid confusion. Having a second game have the exact same title is what is making this confusing.

Or at least add Revised Edition to the cover. This is a total revision after all. My FLGS might not get this one because they went in on the first release that they can't sell now.
 

TrippyHippy

Adventurer
This should be called a Second edition, if only to avoid confusion. Having a second game have the exact same title is what is making this confusing.

Or at least add Revised Edition to the cover. This is a total revision after all. My FLGS might not get this one because they went in on the first release that they can't sell now.
The only counter to this is that they may just update the PDF copy of the original book, if purchased through drivethrurpg, without any extra charge.

If I was requesting a copy at my FLGS, I’d be insisting on it being printed in 2020.
 

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