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The Lost City - Goodman Games Next Classic TSR Adventure Revisited

From their GenCon Livestream on Facebook, Goodman Games has announced the next of their Original Adventures Reincarnated will be 1982's The Lost City by Tom Moldvay. This follows the big hardcovers of Into the Borderlands, The Isle of Dread, and Expedition to the Barrier Peaks.

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The Lost City takes place within a massive pyramid in a city buried in the desert, and was originally a 32-page module. Goodman Games takes these old modules and presents the original plus a 5th Edition update and other materials in a big compiled hardcover.
 
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Comments

Galendril

Registered User
I love the idea of updating classic D&D modules for 5e. But, I hate the fact that Goodman Games wastes pages on reprinting them verbatim and then the updated version. Anyone who wants the old modules can get them easily enough. So far, it's been a hard pass from me. I want to see a lot more creativity. Instead, I see GG cashing in on nostalgia.
 

SMHWorlds

Registered User
This is one my favorites and an underrated module from the B/X years. I guess as long as these are successful, they will keep doing them, but the price point is a turn off for a module I already have and conversions I can do myself. Still, I am happy people are enjoying these blasts from the past.
 

kenmarable

Villager
Interesting!

This was the first D&D adventure I ever played, so it certainly has a special place in my heart. So I will definitely see about picking this up.

Also, I've been working the past several months on a series of adventures/sourcebook concerning the Lost City for DMs Guild I'm hoping to get out soon. However, I'm focusing on building out the actual Lost City rather than the temple (which, amusingly the original adventure entitled "The Lost City" actually had very little to do with the city itself - but still an awesome adventure!) and leaning very heavily on the dream aspects of the Cynidiceans.

Either way, I'm excited to see what they come up with, especially if they do try to make more sense of the lower levels.
 

Connorsrpg

Adventurer
Oh, when I saw this on Twitter, I thought of the Forbidden City. Either way, both are great choices and I have used both in my Egyptian-themed part of my setting :D
I remember detailing and adding to the dungeon levels for this module.
 

Jay Verkuilen

Registered User
I will say, I am not all that thrilled with how they are taking these classic modules and putting them in 400 page books though. That's just too much. Defeats the purpose of modules (short one shots).
I don't necessarily agree that modules are short one shots. Keep on the Borderlands and many other modules from that era are really mini campaign settings. One could have several sessions working through one of those. Still, I'm really put off by 400 page hardcovers. I do wish the 5Eized versions and maybe some additional content was available in a smaller format. I suppose I could get it in PDF form but still... that's a LOT of extra shelf space.
 

Koren n'Rhys

Explorer
I love the idea of updating classic D&D modules for 5e. But, I hate the fact that Goodman Games wastes pages on reprinting them verbatim and then the updated version. Anyone who wants the old modules can get them easily enough. So far, it's been a hard pass from me. I want to see a lot more creativity. Instead, I see GG cashing in on nostalgia.
See, I'm the absolute opposite. If this was merely a 5e update, I'd never even look at it. The appeal of the Goodman books is the reprint, plus the essays just as much, if not more, than the 5e stuff and expanded content (which I can use running it in either version). I'm buying a retrospective coffee table book to enjoy, not just a 5e adventure.
 
This is a great choice, given that they're expanding the content in each of these, and large portions of the city are left vague. It'd be great to see them go back to the inspirational material -- Lieber's Quarmall, which they are certainly familiar with -- when fleshing out the city.

I do think we're going to get Palace of the Silver Princess at some point, but I'd really like to see Castle Amber one of these days.
 

Parmandur

Adventurer
This is a great choice, given that they're expanding the content in each of these, and large portions of the city are left vague. It'd be great to see them go back to the inspirational material -- Lieber's Quarmall, which they are certainly familiar with -- when fleshing out the city.

I do think we're going to get Palace of the Silver Princess at some point, but I'd really like to see Castle Amber one of these days.
Yeah, I grabbed an old copy of B4 at Half Price Books a while ago, and have considered running it in 5E sometime: if the expansion is...well, expansive, this might still be worthwhile.

B3 is soooo perfect for their format, though, with the wacky publication shenanigans. I would love being able to compare the two versions, and get an expanded 5E version.
 

timbannock

Explorer
Nice!

I held off from getting these because of the factors many other folks have noted: including reprints of the original adventures didn't seem *that* big of a draw for the page count, the price tag was a bit high, and the conversion work seems relatively easy, overall.

I finally picked up Isle of Dread because I wanted to utilize it with some of the rulesy stuff in Ghosts of Saltmarsh. And my word, I was so mistaken to have waited this long! I immediately ordered Into the Borderlands as well. What I found was the following, which may not win everyone over (and that's fine! you do you!), but it sure made me rethink my stance on the line:

*The reprint portions come with fun essays and give you a sense of how to run the stuff in 5E in a more condensed format, meaning you see at a glance what stuff was "original content" and what's new from Goodman Games. So you have the power to easily make these adventures much bigger and more sprawling, or keep them simple and sweet without needing to guess at what parts to include or not.

*The 5e conversion work is not simple 1:1 monster and magic item conversions, not by a long shot. Goodman Games' crew has taken great care to provide dozens and dozens of new monsters, to alter existing stat blocks (like run-of-the-mill guards and pirates) with interesting mechanics and clearly explained weapon or gear swaps, and to make use of books like Volo's Guide to Monsters and others to source appropriate monsters. Isle of Dread alone has something like 20-30 entirely new stat blocks, some stat blocks reprinted from other sources (like VGM or Tomb of Annihilation), plus well over a dozen new, unique NPC stat blocks. On top of that, in the text some existing stat blocks feature alterations that are pretty fun, along with tactics write-ups that make them easy to use: Into the Borderlands features guard stat blocks with different weapon and armor loadouts that make for unique combat strategies.

*The new material provided for the adventures have, IMHO, been nothing but exceptionally high-quality additions. Goodman's team clearly cares about sticking with the tone of the original adventures, while simultaneously providing story hooks that make the adventures "feel" like the more recent, highly-story driven releases from Wizards of the Coast. That's really tough to balance, but they do so expertly, keeping the new material and story hooks separated from the original stuff, but still easily referenced. It's a master class in how to do "old school" and "new school" in the same release, often with lots and lots of options.

*All of this lends to the replayability of the modules, something that some of the more recent adventure paths and campaigns don't do well. Even adventures like Out of the Abyss and Storm King's Thunder, which have huge sandbox sections, feature a generally linear portion bookending that. Into the Borderlands and Isle of Dread feature great story ideas, but do so as optional information in a way that allows them to stay sandboxes even if/when you add those bigger story hooks in.

I've made ample use of Isle of Dread's monsters when running some material from Ghosts of Saltmarsh as well as a few one-shots from Uncaged. That's quite the gamut. So if you're on the fence about these releases, consider those points.

I'm excited for this announcement, and I swear I'm not paid by Goodman to post this! ;-P
 
B3 is soooo perfect for their format, though, with the wacky publication shenanigans. I would love being able to compare the two versions, and get an expanded 5E version.
Given how important the historical record part of these books is to Goodman -- which, based on the reviews on Amazon, isn't necessarily what many of the buyers care about -- my guess is that they're trying to line up as much information on what happened with B3 as they can, including unpublished art, interviews from people who might still have strong feelings about what went down, etc.

As an adventure, it's nothing special, though, so I'm fine with Goodman skipping it for now. B4 has a lot more potential at the table, even if the historical record isn't going to be anything particularly interesting.

After X2 and B3, though, I think we're pretty much through with all the classic modules that WotC hasn't used or that there's a lot of interest in. I mean, I know I'd be excited to see an omnibus version of Dungeonland and The Land Beyond the Magic Mirror, but I suspect I'm close to alone in that. Tales from the Yawning Portal scooped up a bunch of contenders wholesale, and I would be surprised to see either WotC or Goodman Games touch any of those adventures with these books any time soon.

If Goodman could succeed where others have failed and get Gail Gygax to open up Gary's Castle Greyhawk archives, that would be an ideal project for this series.
 

Parmandur

Adventurer
Given how important the historical record part of these books is to Goodman -- which, based on the reviews on Amazon, isn't necessarily what many of the buyers care about -- my guess is that they're trying to line up as much information on what happened with B3 as they can, including unpublished art, interviews from people who might still have strong feelings about what went down, etc.

As an adventure, it's nothing special, though, so I'm fine with Goodman skipping it for now. B4 has a lot more potential at the table, even if the historical record isn't going to be anything particularly interesting.

After X2 and B3, though, I think we're pretty much through with all the classic modules that WotC hasn't used or that there's a lot of interest in. I mean, I know I'd be excited to see an omnibus version of Dungeonland and The Land Beyond the Magic Mirror, but I suspect I'm close to alone in that. Tales from the Yawning Portal scooped up a bunch of contenders wholesale, and I would be surprised to see either WotC or Goodman Games touch any of those adventures with these books any time soon.

If Goodman could succeed where others have failed and get Gail Gygax to open up Gary's Castle Greyhawk archives, that would be an ideal project for this series.
I presume the list of modules they can use is based on what WotC has no interest in using in further Ghosts of Saltmarsh style books, and it's interesting to speculate on what that might entail. However, there are a large number of modules they can still do, either way, it'll be fun to see what they can do to make them interesting.
 

Parmandur

Adventurer
Nice!

I held off from getting these because of the factors many other folks have noted: including reprints of the original adventures didn't seem *that* big of a draw for the page count, the price tag was a bit high, and the conversion work seems relatively easy, overall.

I finally picked up Isle of Dread because I wanted to utilize it with some of the rulesy stuff in Ghosts of Saltmarsh. And my word, I was so mistaken to have waited this long! I immediately ordered Into the Borderlands as well. What I found was the following, which may not win everyone over (and that's fine! you do you!), but it sure made me rethink my stance on the line:

*The reprint portions come with fun essays and give you a sense of how to run the stuff in 5E in a more condensed format, meaning you see at a glance what stuff was "original content" and what's new from Goodman Games. So you have the power to easily make these adventures much bigger and more sprawling, or keep them simple and sweet without needing to guess at what parts to include or not.

*The 5e conversion work is not simple 1:1 monster and magic item conversions, not by a long shot. Goodman Games' crew has taken great care to provide dozens and dozens of new monsters, to alter existing stat blocks (like run-of-the-mill guards and pirates) with interesting mechanics and clearly explained weapon or gear swaps, and to make use of books like Volo's Guide to Monsters and others to source appropriate monsters. Isle of Dread alone has something like 20-30 entirely new stat blocks, some stat blocks reprinted from other sources (like VGM or Tomb of Annihilation), plus well over a dozen new, unique NPC stat blocks. On top of that, in the text some existing stat blocks feature alterations that are pretty fun, along with tactics write-ups that make them easy to use: Into the Borderlands features guard stat blocks with different weapon and armor loadouts that make for unique combat strategies.

*The new material provided for the adventures have, IMHO, been nothing but exceptionally high-quality additions. Goodman's team clearly cares about sticking with the tone of the original adventures, while simultaneously providing story hooks that make the adventures "feel" like the more recent, highly-story driven releases from Wizards of the Coast. That's really tough to balance, but they do so expertly, keeping the new material and story hooks separated from the original stuff, but still easily referenced. It's a master class in how to do "old school" and "new school" in the same release, often with lots and lots of options.

*All of this lends to the replayability of the modules, something that some of the more recent adventure paths and campaigns don't do well. Even adventures like Out of the Abyss and Storm King's Thunder, which have huge sandbox sections, feature a generally linear portion bookending that. Into the Borderlands and Isle of Dread feature great story ideas, but do so as optional information in a way that allows them to stay sandboxes even if/when you add those bigger story hooks in.

I've made ample use of Isle of Dread's monsters when running some material from Ghosts of Saltmarsh as well as a few one-shots from Uncaged. That's quite the gamut. So if you're on the fence about these releases, consider those points.

I'm excited for this announcement, and I swear I'm not paid by Goodman to post this! ;-P
I was confused about why X1 was released when it was, but in retrospect they must have worked with WotC to coordinate with Ghosts of Saltmarsh (down to Ghosts of Saltmarsh giving advise for using the material in Mystarra!).

Into the Borderlands combines B1 and B2 into a pretty great sandbox minisetting in the 5E version, tying the two backgrounds together and providing story links between the Keep and the B1 dungeon and broader world.
 

Dire Bare

Adventurer
See, I'm the absolute opposite. If this was merely a 5e update, I'd never even look at it. The appeal of the Goodman books is the reprint, plus the essays just as much, if not more, than the 5e stuff and expanded content (which I can use running it in either version). I'm buying a retrospective coffee table book to enjoy, not just a 5e adventure.
I've got no issue with the current format Goodman is using, even though it doesn't float my boat particularly. With one exception, they need to publish a digital version, either PDF or on D&D Beyond, I'd go for that!
 
I presume the list of modules they can use is based on what WotC has no interest in using in further Ghosts of Saltmarsh style books, and it's interesting to speculate on what that might entail. However, there are a large number of modules they can still do, either way, it'll be fun to see what they can do to make them interesting.
If we assume that everything from Tales from the Yawning Portal is off the table, as well as the original Ravenloft module, and Ghosts of Saltmarsh (because both WotC and Goodman Games probably don't want two in-print products cannibalizing sales), I don't know that there's really that much left that the audience would consider classics:

A1-4, the Slavers series, seems ripe for The Ghosts of Saltmarsh treatment. It's Greyhawk-based, but it's set in the Pomarj, which is a pretty generic "badlands with bandits and goblins and such" region. I suspect Forgotten Realms fans can think of places to set the adventure before reaching the end of this sentence.

B3, the Palace of the Silver Princess, had a messy path to publication which definitely seems like a subject matter Goodman will want to explore, including very different prints of the adventure. I'd consider this a lock for an upcoming book in this series.

B5-B12 includes some well-liked adventures, like Horror on the Hill, the Veiled Society and Rahasia, but I don't know that any of them has a constituency eager for them to be reprinted or their history explored.

The most prominent C module -- Hidden Shrine of Tamoachan -- was already in Yawning Portal. The next runner up, C2: Ghost Tower of the Inverness, is a fine but not amazing funhouse dungeon. Geographically, it's located in the neighborhood of the Slaver series, so it might be a good candidate to include in there, much like the Saltmarsh series was fleshed out with other adventures.

No one cares about or misses the Companion modules. Their only real selling point is that they're rare high level adventures, but they don't seem likely to either get the Saltmarsh treatment or be put in this Goodman reprint series.

The D series is awesome, but since the Giant series is in Tales from the Yawning Portal, it seems challenging to use them in a reprint product. Maybe WotC might bring them back as part of a Saltmarsh style Underdark book, but the Greyhawk Underdark is a different place from the Forgotten Realms one and is one of the few classic modules that has such a strong tie to its setting. I'd be surprised to see this one come back.

The DA Blackmoor adventures don't seem like ones WotC wants to call a lot of attention to, given the weirdness between Arneson and TSR over the years. And if Goodman was going to do a Blackmoor project, I suspect they'd be more likely to go back to the original source, rather than reprint the TSR modules.

The DDA Mystara modules are too obscure and setting-specific to be worth bothering with.

The Dragonlance modules seem like a great candidate for doing something with, but it seems like it'd be beyond the scope (and outside of the preferred tone) of the Goodman project. Is this the longest period that Dragonlance has been out of print as a gaming product? It feels like WotC must be working on something ... right?

The Dark Sun modules probably are pretty interesting historically, but I can't see WotC letting someone else play with those before they get a chance to use them some time.

As I said before, I'm probably close to the entire audience for EX 1: Dungeonland and EX 2: Land Beyond the Magic Mirror. I'd expect a new third party Lewis Carroll based product for 5E before I'd expect to see these back in print in some fashion. (If someone did a Castle Greyhawk product, though, these and some of the other ephemera would be good to see in a companion volume.)

The Giant series was in Tales from the Yawning Portal.

The GA series doesn't have the audience. If we didn't see anything from the Murky Deep in Ghosts of Saltmarsh, we're not likely to ever see it.

The H (or Bloodstone) series doesn't seem likely to be revisited outside of, maybe, a theoretical mass combat product from WotC. But D&D has moved away from simulating fantasy armies. I think WotC is likely happy to leave this to third party products.

The HHQ (solo challenge adventures) don't have a big constituency and don't seem like a product that lends itself to giant hardcover phone books, since the interest would be using them at the table. Fans of these should be lobbying third party providers to make new adventures like these.

The HW (Hollow World) adventures are hyper-specific to their setting, which isn't easily portable to other campaign settings, unless there's a whole lot more hollow worlds out there than we realized.

As I said before, I suspect I6 (Ravenloft) is off the table because of Curse of Strahd. The rest of the line is a real mixed bag. I1, Dwellers of the Forbidden City is pretty good, although barebones by today's standards. It might be a good basis for a Ghosts of Saltmarsh style product. The Desert of Desolation modules (I3 through I5) seem like a likely Ghosts of Saltmarsh style product -- in fact, I suspect it's on their shortlist. The rest of the line is ... OK. If anyone is really pining to see a 5E update of Tomb of the Lizard King, I'd be surprised.

The IM, Immortal series, has the same issue as the COM modules, but only moreso. I mean, yeah, there's very few adventures out there for divinely ascended player characters, but I would expect to see this stuff, at best, used as flavor for 5E epic level rules, like they were for the 3E rules.

I could see L1-3 getting the Goodman treatment, if it wasn't for Leonard Lafofka continuing to turn out new adventures and materials on Dragonsfoot, as recently as five years ago. And only L1, the Secret of Bone Hill, casts much of a cultural shadow, and it's pretty minor. Again, if it was going to be used, it probably would have been tucked into the Ghosts of Saltmarsh.

M (Master) series has the same issues as the Companion and Immortal adventures.

The MV and MSOLO adventures have a very small audience. If they ever came back, I imagined they'd be as an app.

The N series has one beloved module -- N1, Against the Cult of the Reptile God -- which I wouldn't be surprised to see WotC reprint in some fashion. But the rest of the line runs from unremembered to actively hated.

The two O (One on One) adventures seem better suited for an app than anything.

The OA (Oriental Adventures) content seems unlikely to reappear until WotC does a more Asian-flavored book. (And likely they'd ditch "Oriental," which was dated in the 1980s and actively pisses a lot of people off now.) Given that there's an Asian polearm that doesn't appear in the PHB in the Warriors & Weapons Young Adventurers Book, I wonder if something is being developed along those lines now.

OP1, Tales from the Outer Planes, and Q1, Queen of the Demonweb Pits, both seem unlikely to be reprinted. OP1, because it's a sort-of-remembered anthology and Q1 because it's so tied to the G and D series.

The R series of RPGA modules would probably be really interesting to the historical reprint set, especially given that the last few of Frank Metzner's adventures in the series were never published. How large that audience is, though, is probably a problem. The separate RPGA line has similar issues, especially since several of them were reprinted under the main TSR lines.

The three early Ravenloft modules in the RA series are all setting-specific and just OK. If anyone was going to touch these, it would likely be WotC. I can't imagine this is the way they'd go about expanding Curse of Strahd, though.

The first two S modules are in Tales from the Yawning Portal and S3, Expedition to the Barrier Peaks, is coming from Goodman later this year. S4, the Lost Caverns of Tsojancth, is fine, but mostly fun because it's a big bucket of new monsters, spells and treasure, plenty of which don't exist in 5E. I suspect WotC would rather just pull content from that as appropriate than do anything with it, though. The final S adventure, Labyrinth of Madness, probably has an audience, but 2E seems beyond Goodman's apparent interest so far and I don't know that it has enough to worry about history-wise. And WotC is capable of making new deadly dungeons if they want to.

I feel comfortable saying that none of the Spelljammer adventures will get updated without WotC being at the helm.

T1-4 (which really ought to be T1 and T2 ... it's two adventures, the Village of Hommlet and the Temple of Elemental Evil, man!) does seem like a decent candidate for a reprint. But Gail Gygax's reticence in letting any of Gary's material pass into others' hands makes it hard to see how Goodman would give it the treatment Joseph Goodman would want to and I suspect WotC feels like they've already covered this thematic territory in Princes of the Apocalypse.

The Saltmarsh series, obviously, is in Ghosts of Saltmarsh.

The UK series (plus I8, which was produced by that same group) seems like a really good candidate for a Goodman reprint product, for the historical perspective alone, but eight adventures is a lot. Some of the adventures are well-remembered, though -- Beyond the Crystal Cave, along with Danger at Dunwater, was the first time I remember an official adventure where slaughtering everything in sight wasn't the obvious right choice.

All the World of Greyhawk adventures seem unlikely to be something Goodman would have access to, between WotC holding onto Oerth for themselves for now and Gail Gygax's discomfort with letting other people look at Gary's archives.

There are a lot of X modules. X1, the Isle of Dread, has already been published by Goodman. I think X2, Castle Amber, is a great candidate for another book in the series. After that, though, you run the gauntlet from OK to deeply problematic (I can't imagine anyone will be given the rights to do anything with Drums on Fire Mountain).

After that, you're out of the classic era. I can't imagine Goodman Games getting excited about anything from the 1990s or later. A lot of the great stuff from that era, like the Planescape books, seem unlikely to reappear outside of a new WotC product.
 
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I've got no issue with the current format Goodman is using, even though it doesn't float my boat particularly. With one exception, they need to publish a digital version, either PDF or on D&D Beyond, I'd go for that!
They don't seem to have the rights for that. Their product pages mention very explicitly that they won't be in PDF format.
 

Koren n'Rhys

Explorer
The further along the Basic timeline we get, the less iconic those modules feel to me. I had been thinking B4 would be PERFECT for them to spotlight, so this is a very welcome announcement. What next though? I'd think more classic 1E modules would be the way to go. Even though WotC already reused some (Giants, Tomb of Horrors, Tamoachan, Elemental Evil) I'd still like to see more by Goodman. Slavers maybe?
 

Dire Bare

Adventurer
They don't seem to have the rights for that. Their product pages mention very explicitly that they won't be in PDF format.
Oh, I'm sure they have their reasons for not offering digital, I just don't care what they are! :)

Between WotC and Goodman, I'm sure they COULD offer digital versions, but they (as a licensing partnership) are choosing not too. I wish they would reconsider, as I haven't purchased any of the hardcovers, and likely won't, but I would certainly pick up digital versions of the entire series. I think it's certainly within possibility for this to happen, but I won't hold my breath . . . .
 

Parmandur

Adventurer
If we assume that everything from Tales from the Yawning Portal is off the table, as well as the original Ravenloft module, and Ghosts of Saltmarsh (because both WotC and Goodman Games probably don't want two in-print products cannibalizing sales), I don't know that there's really that much left that the audience would consider classics:

A1-4, the Slavers series, seems ripe for The Ghosts of Saltmarsh treatment. It's Greyhawk-based, but it's set in the Pomarj, which is a pretty generic "badlands with bandits and goblins and such" region. I suspect Forgotten Realms fans can think of places to set the adventure before reaching the end of this sentence.

B3, the Palace of the Silver Princess, had a messy path to publication which definitely seems like a subject matter Goodman will want to explore, including very different prints of the adventure. I'd consider this a lock for an upcoming book in this series.

B5-B12 includes some well-liked adventures, like Horror on the Hill, the Veiled Society and Rahasia, but I don't know that any of them has a constituency eager for them to be reprinted or their history explored.

The most prominent C module -- Hidden Shrine of Tamoachan -- was already in Yawning Portal. The next runner up, C2: Ghost Tower of the Inverness, is a fine but not amazing funhouse dungeon. Geographically, it's located in the neighborhood of the Slaver series, so it might be a good candidate to include in there, much like the Saltmarsh series was fleshed out with other adventures.

No one cares about or misses the Companion modules. Their only real selling point is that they're rare high level adventures, but they don't seem likely to either get the Saltmarsh treatment or be put in this Goodman reprint series.

The D series is awesome, but since the Giant series is in Tales from the Yawning Portal, it seems challenging to use them in a reprint product. Maybe WotC might bring them back as part of a Saltmarsh style Underdark book, but the Greyhawk Underdark is a different place from the Forgotten Realms one and is one of the few classic modules that has such a strong tie to its setting. I'd be surprised to see this one come back.

The DA Blackmoor adventures don't seem like ones WotC wants to call a lot of attention to, given the weirdness between Arneson and TSR over the years. And if Goodman was going to do a Blackmoor project, I suspect they'd be more likely to go back to the original source, rather than reprint the TSR modules.

The DDA Mystara modules are too obscure and setting-specific to be worth bothering with.

The Dragonlance modules seem like a great candidate for doing something with, but it seems like it'd be beyond the scope (and outside of the preferred tone) of the Goodman project. Is this the longest period that Dragonlance has been out of print as a gaming product? It feels like WotC must be working on something ... right?

The Dark Sun modules probably are pretty interesting historically, but I can't see WotC letting someone else play with those before they get a chance to use them some time.

As I said before, I'm probably close to the entire audience for EX 1: Dungeonland and EX 2: Land Beyond the Magic Mirror. I'd expect a new third party Lewis Carroll based product for 5E before I'd expect to see these back in print in some fashion. (If someone did a Castle Greyhawk product, though, these and some of the other ephemera would be good to see in a companion volume.)

The Giant series was in Tales from the Yawning Portal.

The GA series doesn't have the audience. If we didn't see anything from the Murky Deep in Ghosts of Saltmarsh, we're not likely to ever see it.

The H (or Bloodstone) series doesn't seem likely to be revisited outside of, maybe, a theoretical mass combat product from WotC. But D&D has moved away from simulating fantasy armies. I think WotC is likely happy to leave this to third party products.

The HHQ (solo challenge adventures) don't have a big constituency and don't seem like a product that lends itself to giant hardcover phone books, since the interest would be using them at the table. Fans of these should be lobbying third party providers to make new adventures like these.

The HW (Hollow World) adventures are hyper-specific to their setting, which isn't easily portable to other campaign settings, unless there's a whole lot more hollow worlds out there than we realized.

As I said before, I suspect I6 (Ravenloft) is off the table because of Curse of Strahd. The rest of the line is a real mixed bag. I1, Dwellers of the Forbidden City is pretty good, although barebones by today's standards. It might be a good basis for a Ghosts of Saltmarsh style product. The Desert of Desolation modules (I3 through I5) seem like a likely Ghosts of Saltmarsh style product -- in fact, I suspect it's on their shortlist. The rest of the line is ... OK. If anyone is really pining to see a 5E update of Tomb of the Lizard King, I'd be surprised.

The IM, Immortal series, has the same issue as the COM modules, but only moreso. I mean, yeah, there's very few adventures out there for divinely ascended player characters, but I would expect to see this stuff, at best, used as flavor for 5E epic level rules, like they were for the 3E rules.

I could see L1-3 getting the Goodman treatment, if it wasn't for Leonard Lafofka continuing to turn out new adventures and materials on Dragonsfoot, as recently as five years ago. And only L1, the Secret of Bone Hill, casts much of a cultural shadow, and it's pretty minor. Again, if it was going to be used, it probably would have been tucked into the Ghosts of Saltmarsh.

M (Master) series has the same issues as the Companion and Immortal adventures.

The MV and MSOLO adventures have a very small audience. If they ever came back, I imagined they'd be as an app.

The N series has one beloved module -- N1, Against the Cult of the Reptile God -- which I wouldn't be surprised to see WotC reprint in some fashion. But the rest of the line runs from unremembered to actively hated.

The two O (One on One) adventures seem better suited for an app than anything.

The OA (Oriental Adventures) content seems unlikely to reappear until WotC does a more Asian-flavored book. (And likely they'd ditch "Oriental," which was dated in the 1980s and actively pisses a lot of people off now.) Given that there's an Asian polearm that doesn't appear in the PHB in the Warriors & Weapons Young Adventurers Book, I wonder if something is being developed along those lines now.

OP1, Tales from the Outer Planes, and Q1, Queen of the Demonweb Pits, both seem unlikely to be reprinted. OP1, because it's a sort-of-remembered anthology and Q1 because it's so tied to the G and D series.

The R series of RPGA modules would probably be really interesting to the historical reprint set, especially given that the last few of Frank Metzner's adventures in the series were never published. How large that audience is, though, is probably a problem. The separate RPGA line has similar issues, especially since several of them were reprinted under the main TSR lines.

The three early Ravenloft modules in the RA series are all setting-specific and just OK. If anyone was going to touch these, it would likely be WotC. I can't imagine this is the way they'd go about expanding Curse of Strahd, though.

The first two S modules are in Tales from the Yawning Portal and S3, Expedition to the Barrier Peaks, is coming from Goodman later this year. S4, the Lost Caverns of Tsojancth, is fine, but mostly fun because it's a big bucket of new monsters, spells and treasure, plenty of which don't exist in 5E. I suspect WotC would rather just pull content from that as appropriate than do anything with it, though. The final S adventure, Labyrinth of Madness, probably has an audience, but 2E seems beyond Goodman's apparent interest so far and I don't know that it has enough to worry about history-wise. And WotC is capable of making new deadly dungeons if they want to.

I feel comfortable saying that none of the Spelljammer adventures will get updated without WotC being at the helm.

T1-4 (which really ought to be T1 and T2 ... it's two adventures, the Village of Hommlet and the Temple of Elemental Evil, man!) does seem like a decent candidate for a reprint. But Gail Gygax's reticence in letting any of Gary's material pass into others' hands makes it hard to see how Goodman would give it the treatment Joseph Goodman would want to and I suspect WotC feels like they've already covered this thematic territory in Princes of the Apocalypse.

The Saltmarsh series, obviously, is in Ghosts of Saltmarsh.

The UK series (plus I8, which was produced by that same group) seems like a really good candidate for a Goodman reprint product, for the historical perspective alone, but eight adventures is a lot. Some of the adventures are well-remembered, though -- Beyond the Crystal Cave, along with Danger at Dunwater, was the first time I remember an official adventure where slaughtering everything in sight wasn't the obvious right choice.

All the World of Greyhawk adventures seem unlikely to be something Goodman would have access to, between WotC holding onto Oerth for themselves for now and Gail Gygax's discomfort with letting other people look at Gary's archives.

There are a lot of X modules. X1, the Isle of Dread, has already been published by Goodman. I think X2, Castle Amber, is a great candidate for another book in the series. After that, though, you run the gauntlet from OK to deeply problematic (I can't imagine anyone will be given the rights to do anything with Drums on Fire Mountain).

After that, you're out of the classic era. I can't imagine Goodman Games getting excited about anything from the 1990s or later. A lot of the great stuff from that era, like the Planescape books, seem unlikely to reappear outside of a new WotC product.
Some good speculation here.

I would note that N1 & I2 take place in close proximity to each other, and to Ghosts if Saltmarsh, in Keoland. They seem to me likely candidates for a WotC product along similar lines.

D1-3, and maybe Q, also seem a perfect fit for a GoS style product, with other Underdark modules (Night Below is perennially popular and explicitly tied to D1-3 by geography, Dungeon magazine, etc.). Throw in some Dungeoner's Survival Guide style material, and you're cooking with fire.

The Slaver's and T1-4 seem good WotC material, too. Tsjocanth and WG4 tie into each other and are geographically and thematically proximate to the Temple of Elemental Evil (in addition to being Mearls personal favorites).

For Goodman, I could X4-5 being a good combo book. The Arneson stuff is likely perfect for them, as well.
 

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