D&D 5E The Printers Can't Handle WotC's One D&D Print Runs!

"Our print runs are pretty darn big" says Jeremy Crawford

15692108293125663812.jpeg

One of the reasons why the three new core rulebooks next year will not be released together is because D&D is such a juggernaut that the printers can't actually handle the size of the print runs!

Jeremy Crawford told Polygon "Our print runs are pretty darn big and printers are telling us you can’t give us these three books at the same time.” And Chris Perkins added that "The print runs we’re talking about are massive. That’s been not only true of the core books, but also Tasha’s Cauldron. It’s what we call a high-end problem."
 

log in or register to remove this ad

yes, certainly, the question is by how much. I didn’t mean to say gas prices have no effect on book prices, but it is a rather diminished one compared to the actual increase of the gas price


shipping costs have gone down significantly since

View attachment 286593


Assuming this is accurate that is a good sign. The last time I looked into it was when I released a book last year. But my hope is, and one reason I think we should not just assume that books need a steady increase in cover price, is things might start to return to normal price levels (anyone who has been the store lately knows the frustration of items climbing up in cost)
 

log in or register to remove this ad

If you're looking for lower prices, I bet there plenty of other TTRPGs out there that will give you a better bang for your buck!

How about Pathfinder 1E pocket guides?
 

And I'm sorry, but you'd be hard pressed to make a convincing argument about how a game where you pretend to be an elf won't always be considered a luxury item.
Slight quibble here. It's definitely a discretionary item, as it is not necessary to maintain a lifestyle. But "luxury", although there is not as clear a definition, has connotations that it is "excessive" (from the latin root) and has a high price. Typically a luxury item is scarce. If the demand for it increases when the price increases, you know you have a successful luxury good!

I'd argue that the roleplaying games most of us play are non-luxury discretionary items. Typical costs of play are cents per dollar-hour. On the other hand, I have also payed $25 to play in a game run by a master GM; that could be considered a luxury item. This fits in my definition of a luxury item. But in general, the default way of playing seems economical rather than luxury to me.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Slight quibble here. It's definitely a discretionary item, as it is not necessary to maintain a lifestyle. But "luxury", although there is not as clear a definition, has connotations that it is "excessive" (from the latin root) and has a high price. Typically a luxury item is scarce. If the demand for it increases when the price increases, you know you have a successful luxury good!

I'd argue that the roleplaying games most of us play are non-luxury discretionary items. Typical costs of play are cents per dollar-hour. On the other hand, I have also payed $25 to play in a game run by a master GM; that could be considered a luxury item. This fits in my definition of a luxury item. But in general, the default way of playing seems economical rather than luxury to me.
Luxury and necessity goods have definitions in economics, and tabletop games definitely fall under the definition of luxury items, even if they are cheap: theybare an item where demand increases faster than income as income increases, and demand falls faster than income if income decreases.
 

Slight quibble here. It's definitely a discretionary item, as it is not necessary to maintain a lifestyle. But "luxury", although there is not as clear a definition, has connotations that it is "excessive" (from the latin root) and has a high price. Typically a luxury item is scarce. If the demand for it increases when the price increases, you know you have a successful luxury good!

I'd argue that the roleplaying games most of us play are non-luxury discretionary items. Typical costs of play are cents per dollar-hour. On the other hand, I have also payed $25 to play in a game run by a master GM; that could be considered a luxury item. This fits in my definition of a luxury item. But in general, the default way of playing seems economical rather than luxury to me.
There's plenty of subjectiveness in what you're saying there. A $60 192 page hardcover book is expensive when you compare it to other hardcover books. The current top hardcover book listed in the best seller section on Barnes and Noble is $29.99 for a 528 page book. Additionally with the rise of cheaper digital ways to play TTRPGs, the books are becoming more and more of a luxury collector's piece to display on a bookshelf.
 

Clint_L

Legend
There's plenty of subjectiveness in what you're saying there. A $60 192 page hardcover book is expensive when you compare it to other hardcover books. The current top hardcover book listed in the best seller section on Barnes and Noble is $29.99 for a 528 page book. Additionally with the rise of cheaper digital ways to play TTRPGs, the books are becoming more and more of a luxury collector's piece to display on a bookshelf.
That's a novel, not a heavily illustrated, large-sized rule book. Apples and oranges.
 



Mistwell

Crusty Old Meatwad (he/him)
So I'm going to go out on a limb and assume that you're older. One of the issues that older people have (for real!) and the reason that people have this caricature of older people being "cheap" that is also true is that older people have had decades of being used to prices at a certain point. In effect, we have been "anchored" to those prices. So even when we can intellectually understand that prices do change, it's still hard to emotionally understand that prices mean something different now.

If you look back at this post, you can see that the prices aren't actually different in terms of inflation, and that prices have always tended to hover in the $50-$60 price range for a core book. In fact, this price point will be less that the 2014 price point.

So when you say it is too expensive, it is, in fact, less expensive than when it was released in 2014. Again, I understand how it feels emotionally ... but that's not what is happening.
Typically this gets "Inflation has gone up but wages have not kept up." Except...household income also went up since 2014 at a pace which is at or faster than this new price point as well (though it took a dip in 2020 of course).
 

There's plenty of subjectiveness in what you're saying there. A $60 192 page hardcover book is expensive when you compare it to other hardcover books. The current top hardcover book listed in the best seller section on Barnes and Noble is $29.99 for a 528 page book. Additionally with the rise of cheaper digital ways to play TTRPGs, the books are becoming more and more of a luxury collector's piece to display on a bookshelf.
The 528 page book will take me about 10 hours to read, making its cost $3/hour. Assuming i play a year of an rpg before moving on to a new game, playing every two weeks for 3 hours, with gaps, that’s about 120 hours, for a total of about 55 cents an hour.
 

Voidrunner's Codex

Remove ads

Voidrunner's Codex

Remove ads

Top