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5E The Scout Rogue - how did it work out?

Retreater

Legend
The rogue is probably my favorite 5e class; however, I like none of the subclasses. Most of the time, I don't even bother selecting one because their abilities are so situational and paltry that they're basically pointless.
 

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The rogue is probably my favorite 5e class; however, I like none of the subclasses. Most of the time, I don't even bother selecting one because their abilities are so situational and paltry that they're basically pointless.
Hmm... only for the rogue or anyone?
And actually I can't believe it. The arcane trickster and the thief have quite powerful subclass abilities. One can cast spells. The other one is a bit more subtle, but can use a lot of the mundane items in the equippment list in addition to also attacking. That is using ball bearings, caltrops and maybe even include throwing alchemist fire (or at least ignite oil).
 

auburn2

Explorer
The rogue is probably my favorite 5e class; however, I like none of the subclasses. Most of the time, I don't even bother selecting one because their abilities are so situational and paltry that they're basically pointless.
What do you mean you don't select a subclass, they are extra abilities you get for free? I can understand why Assassin or swashbuckler might be situational, if by situational you mean combat with weapons, but I don't get it for the thief and AT.

I don't understand how you think the Arcane Trickster is situational or paltry when she gets spells. The thief too is not very situational with use an object as a bonus action and the jump and climb bonuses they will use their subclass abilities very often.
 

Retreater

Legend
What do you mean you don't select a subclass, they are extra abilities you get for free? I can understand why Assassin or swashbuckler might be situational, if by situational you mean combat with weapons, but I don't get it for the thief and AT.

I don't understand how you think the Arcane Trickster is situational or paltry when she gets spells. The thief too is not very situational with use an object as a bonus action and the jump and climb bonuses they will use their subclass abilities very often.
I think the subclass abilities are forgettable. The rogue already does what it's intended to do (sneak attack, find/remove traps, scout with Stealth). The subclasses are added on subsystems that don't really help the rogue at her job or are more trouble than they're worth to remember to do in the 1 out of 5 sessions they can actually be useful.
Give the rogue a subclass that lets them put conditions on their sneak attack (like blinding or immobilizing a target - Save ends). Give them a subclass that lets them bypass traps and unlock magically locked doors. Give them a subclass that allows them to shadow step (like the monk).
To my knowledge, every other class gets stuff that actually enhances their role in the party. Rogues get worthless junk. ("Oooh ... I can climb slightly better." "Oooh ... I can pick a pocket slightly quicker" - which is an ability that is almost never used, I'd like to add. "Oooh ... if I study a target for 10 minutes I can get a bonus to hit." "Oooh ... I can use poisons" - which are expensive, underpowered, easily saved against, etc.)
 

auburn2

Explorer
Give the rogue a subclass that lets them put conditions on their sneak attack (like blinding or immobilizing a target - Save ends). Give them a subclass that lets them bypass traps and unlock magically locked doors. Give them a subclass that allows them to shadow step (like the monk).
Arcane trickster, thief and assassin all get things similar do this.

Assassin gets abilities that make all hits critical on surprised opponents, use poison and get death attack (albeit at high level). All three of those are significant enhancements to Sneak Attack.

Arcane tricksters can get booming blade that enhances sneak attack and either immobilizes a target or causes them to take extra damage. Green flame blade which enhances sneak attack with fire damage and misty step more or less replicates shadow step without needing dim light or darkness.

A thief can disable and bypass a trap without using an action and any character at all can try to pick something magically locked with arcane lock, the DC is just 10 points higher and therefore usually over 20 meaning a non-rogue without expertise is not likely to be successful but any rogue with expertise in thieves tools will typically have a legit shot.
 

Although that's where they have done most of their impact in the lore. I believe they did appear in Season 2 of the 3D animated Clone Wars at one point though.
Both a jedi and a sith holocron appear in quite a few episodes of Rebels, which is canon. Ezra Bridger is tempted by the dark side after studying the sith holocron.

A jedi holocron is the McGuffin in the recent canonical computer game Jedi: Fallen Order.
 


Retreater

Legend
What kind of subclasses would you like to see?
A couple of posts up I gave this idea: "Give the rogue a subclass that lets them put conditions on their sneak attack (like blinding or immobilizing a target - Save ends). Give them a subclass that lets them bypass traps and unlock magically locked doors. Give them a subclass that allows them to shadow step (like the monk)."
So the subclasses could be something like Opportunistic Striker (better and more versatile sneak attacks), Master Mechanic (trap/lock expert, perhaps also with alchemical crafting), and Shadow Stalker (shadow step, dark vision - or superior dark vision, ability to create/see through magical darkness).
It's about making the rogue do rogue things better, to better complement her role in the party. The subclasses as they are now are mostly centered on solo play to the detriment of the rest of the party.
 

It's about making the rogue do rogue things better, to better complement her role in the party. The subclasses as they are now are mostly centered on solo play to the detriment of the rest of the party.
Yes, you do seem to focus on what the Rogue can do, instead of trying to find out what the Rogue is. The latter seems to be what 5e is most interested in, so I guess you’re not likely to get what you want. I know what a Scout or a Thief is, whereas I have no idea what an Opportunity Striker is supposed to be outside of combat.
 

Retreater

Legend
Yes, you do seem to focus on what the Rogue can do, instead of trying to find out what the Rogue is. The latter seems to be what 5e is most interested in, so I guess you’re not likely to get what you want. I know what a Scout or a Thief is, whereas I have no idea what an Opportunity Striker is supposed to be outside of combat.
"Opportunity Striker" is just a descriptor I wrote (along with the rest of the post) in under 5 minutes. We're talking strictly game mechanics, and the fiction can easily be adapted later.
"Brute Rogue" has adapted to life in unsavory conditions, whether growing up in the rough and tumble docks of a port city, serving on a pirate ship, spending time in captivity, she has learned to take advantage against her enemies.
There. In two minutes you have what she is outside of combat. Give her advantage on Intimidate checks as a subclass feature, and you're done.
 

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