D&D General The word "Dweomer" by Gygax

Nebulous

Legend
It just came to me out of the blue that "dweomer" hasn't been used in D&D since...what, 2nd edition? Ist? I thought Gygax invented it, but a quick Google search says

Borrowed from Middle English dweomer, from Old English dwimor, from Proto-Germanic *dwemrą, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewh₂- (“to whisk, raise dust, fume”).
I always thought having a magical name for "magic" in D&D fit in perfectly. Why was this edited out from the lore in later editions? Genuinely just curious.
 

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pukunui

Legend
I think the term went by the wayside alongside other High Gygaxian terms such as philter and demihuman with 3E.
The one that makes me raise an eyebrow is how "glamer" has changed to "glamour" in 5e (e.g. glamoured studded leather). I mean, I know "glamour" is the UK spelling of "glamor" and that "glamer" is a variant of that word, but I wouldn't expect Americans to deliberately use the British spelling of a word. Wonders will never cease, I suppose!
 




AcererakTriple6

Autistic DM (he/him)
The one that makes me raise an eyebrow is how "glamer" has changed to "glamour" in 5e (e.g. glamoured studded leather). I mean, I know "glamour" is the UK spelling of "glamor" and that "glamer" is a variant of that word, but I wouldn't expect Americans to deliberately use the British spelling of a word. Wonders will never cease, I suppose!
We also spell Gygax's setting as Greyhawk instead of Grayhawk. I guess using the British spellings in certain circumstances seems more "formal" or "unique," I guess.
 


It just came to me out of the blue that "dweomer" hasn't been used in D&D since...what, 2nd edition? Ist? I thought Gygax invented it, but a quick Google search says

Borrowed from Middle English dweomer, from Old English dwimor, from Proto-Germanic *dwemrą, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewh₂- (“to whisk, raise dust, fume”).
I always thought having a magical name for "magic" in D&D fit in perfectly. Why was this edited out from the lore in later editions? Genuinely just curious.
It's a good word, but it's also pretty obscure. My assumption is that they cut down on words that were weird seemingly only for the sake of being weird. "Dweomer" is further hampered by being hard to look up. Even with ready access to the internet, common dictionaries don't define it. None of Dictionary.com, Merriam-Webster, and Collins Dictionary give a definition. And several of the extant definitions/uses today clearly only came about because D&D used it (most places that define it explicitly reference "games" as a usage context).
 





Charlaquin

Goblin Queen (She/Her/Hers)
The one that makes me raise an eyebrow is how "glamer" has changed to "glamour" in 5e (e.g. glamoured studded leather). I mean, I know "glamour" is the UK spelling of "glamor" and that "glamer" is a variant of that word, but I wouldn't expect Americans to deliberately use the British spelling of a word. Wonders will never cease, I suppose!
British spelling makes words feel more fantastical to us. I’m only half-joking; if I’m honest, this is exactly why I insist on using fae and faerie instead of fey and fairy.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen (She/Her/Hers)
We also spell Gygax's setting as Greyhawk instead of Grayhawk. I guess using the British spellings in certain circumstances seems more "formal" or "unique," I guess.
Grey just looks more like how I say the word than gray and accordingly I consistently “misspell” it that way. I’d assume this was particular to where I’m from, but Colorado is in fact where the “neutral” American accent comes from, because it was determined to be the most understandable over the radio.
 

James Gasik

Legend
Supporter
Grey just looks more like how I say the word than gray and accordingly I consistently “misspell” it that way. I’d assume this was particular to where I’m from, but Colorado is in fact where the “neutral” American accent comes from, because it was determined to be the most understandable over the radio.
That's a nice fact to know! I have a friend from New England who doesn't see to know what an "r" is, and another from Minnesota...and I have no idea what she's saying half the time!
 

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