There's A New D&D Cook Book Coming With All The Flavors of the Multiverse

A new officially licenced Dungeon & Dragons cookbook book has appeared on Amazon! While there's no cover image yet, there is a description of Heroes' Feast Flavors of the Multiverse: An Official D&D Cookbook. The hardcover book will be released November 7th for $35.

The book is by Kyle Newman, Jon Peterson, Michael Witwer, and Sam Witwer.


Explore the cuisines of the Dungeons & Dragons multiverse with more than 75 delectable new recipes from the New York Times bestselling authors of Heroes’ Feast.

Never adventure on an empty stomach! From the D&D experts behind the bestselling Heroes’ Feast comes Heroes’ Feast Flavors of the Multiverse,a mouthwatering cookbook stuffed with eclectic fare for solo adventurers and party quests alike. This culinary tour presents original recipes inspired by regions and settings from across the Forgotten Realms and beyond. All seventy-six dishes, developed by a professional chef from one of the country’s top test kitchens, are delicious, easy to prepare, and composed of ingredients readily found in our world.

The immersive recipes in Heroes’ Feast Flavors of the Multiverse are perfect for sharing and entertaining. Dishes are organized by location with options for every occasion—especially game nights!—including

• otherwordly appetizers such as Talyth and Goldenstars
• savory main courses such as Steak of the Deep and Eldeen Banquet
• alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages such as Elverquist and Kaeth
• and desserts such as Green Ice Rime and Vada’s Vanilla Bean Buns

Adventure has never tasted so good!
 
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Not sure whether the Beholder eye soup or the Mimic Stew is the best opening course here (not really up for the House Slaad today). But I'm definitely getting the Tarrasque Steak, rare, with a topping of Myconid Spores, and a scoop of gelatinous cube for desert.
 

Do you know there is AI to create cooking recipes?

I wonder if this cook book is not for D&D players but for adults who buy it as an original gift to family or friends.

And if you want to cook, you should test the Spanish gazpacho, a cold soup, almost a "smoothie". Easy to be made. Let's say its taste is like as a tomate salad.


 


Whizbang Dustyboots

Gnometown Hero
Well they were right, they are monetizing the hell out of D&D, as they say, a fool and their money etc.....
A lot of these themed cookbooks are actually good cookbooks and they're no more expensive than standard cookbooks, Grumpy Cat.

I know if I was running an in-person game that focused on halflings (I've previously run an all-halfling campaign online), I'd certainly invest in one of the many unoffocial Shire cookbooks and serve that food during play.
 

Vincent55

Adventurer
A lot of these themed cookbooks are actually good cookbooks and they're no more expensive than standard cookbooks, Grumpy Cat.

I know if I was running an in-person game that focused on halflings (I've previously run an all-halfling campaign online), I'd certainly invest in one of the many unoffocial Shire cookbooks and serve that food during play.
or you could just take a normal cook book and rename dishes, which i suspect is what is going on here maybe with some variation.
 


or you could just take a normal cook book and rename dishes, which i suspect is what is going on here maybe with some variation.
I've gotten a couple geeky cocktail guides and I hate it when they take a classic cocktail and just slap a nerdy name on it. It's like, do you think it's not obvious that you just copied the recipe of a negroni verbatim?

That being said variation is often where creativity thrives. The difference between a Manhattan and a Rob Roy is just a change.
 

Whizbang Dustyboots

Gnometown Hero
I've gotten a couple geeky cocktail guides and I hate it when they take a classic cocktail and just slap a nerdy name on it. It's like, do you think it's not obvious that you just copied the recipe of a negroni verbatim?

That being said variation is often where creativity thrives. The difference between a Manhattan and a Rob Roy is just a change.
When people don't iterate on cocktails in their books it suggests to me that they don't understand how cocktails work.

Everyone who drinks could make endless versions of sours, for instance, which are (generally speaking) two parts liquor, one part sweetener, one part sour. That's a daiquiri, a gimlet, a margarita and countless more drinks.

Swap the Cointreau from your standard margarita for agave syrup and you've got a Tommy's margarita. Swap in Ancho Reyes chili liqueur and you've a basic spicy margarita. (There are more exciting ways to make them, of course, like shaking them with a sliced and de-seeded jalapeno.)

If you understand how a cocktail works, there's no reason to pretend you just invented the negroni. Swap a few pieces out and publish the best variants!

(Also, everyone should pick up Michael Ruhlman's Book of Cocktail Ratios later this month, which if it's as good as his Ratio cookbook, will be like an incredibly accessible culinary education without feeling like an angry Frenchman is trying to destroy your self-esteem.)
 
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