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D&D 5E Tired of doing WotC's job


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SkidAce

Legend
Yeah but you make up for it volume.

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G

Guest 6801328

Guest
"I'll take every Vitality potion you have in stock, and I'll give you a deposit for every one you plan to make."
"Berserker?"
"Why, yes! What tipped you off?"
 

Lanefan

Victoria Rules
Ho and let's not forget about Gambeson armor that was also made with linen on the exterior and cloth fabric on the interior. It was pretty much a part of every set of armor (especially plate) that would be put underneath. In addition, gambeson was more flexible that the linen (linothorax) armor worn by the greek (and I would guess that some of the leather armors so talked about (and often contested) were in fact linothorax armor). Here I am not saying that leather armor did not exist. It did. But linothorax would be cheaper to make and gambeson was easier to make.
All this boils down to good old "Padded" armour, which has been in the game since day 1.

10' foot poles were costly because they were sturdy enough to be used as shafts for polearms. Not the ladders which were made of relatively soft wood. Hard wood was reserved for wood structures, housing, military stuff (polearms, catapults, trebuchet etc...).
And boats.

The biggest demand on hard wood during the Age of Sail was shipbuilding.
 

All this boils down to good old "Padded" armour, which has been in the game since day 1.

And boats.

The biggest demand on hard wood during the Age of Sail was shipbuilding.
I always thought that the padded armour was way to bad compared to what the Gambeson could do historically. Because of that, I had introduced the Gambeson as an advanced padded (quilted) armor giving AC 6. The downside is that with any roll of 20, the armor was ruined (just like leather and padded armor).

And yes, hard wood was really in demand in shipbuilding.
 


Fenris-77

Small God of the Dozens
The solution here would be to add potions to the store that cost less than 20 GP to make, then the other potions are loss leaders. They get foot traffic and people will buy other potions at the same time, since they're already there and all that.
Merchandising matters too. You want some nice POS displays for some of your better earners, and good staff that know the difference between a good upsell, and trying to spray the dwarf Berserker with your new Diaphanous Lavender hair remover.
 

Undrave

Hero
Merchandising matters too. You want some nice POS displays for some of your better earners, and good staff that know the difference between a good upsell, and trying to spray the dwarf Berserker with your new Diaphanous Lavender hair remover.

You also want to sell fancy accessories! Make your own bottles that can perfectly fit your proprietary potion holsters, which fit perfectly on the belt you sell that hides a flint in the buckle for easy fire starting! And you aren't going to throw your other potions in your satchel with all the rest of your stuff right? Sell them this wonderful wicker carrying case with 8 padded compartments!
 



Xaelvaen

Stuck in the 90s
This isn't a terrible complaint. WoTC (or at least the DM's Guild) could make some serious money off little nitpick things like this. A massive item list with sane prices for 5E, more detailed curse/affliction/detect magic style rules.

Add to that, more detailed tactical options. All of these things were left out to make the game far easier to play, and understand, and that's fantastic - it's 5E's biggest standpoint. But adding OPTIONAL content source material for people who want more out of the core system, is never a terrible idea.
 

Northern Phoenix

Adventurer
This isn't a terrible complaint. WoTC (or at least the DM's Guild) could make some serious money off little nitpick things like this. A massive item list with sane prices for 5E, more detailed curse/affliction/detect magic style rules.

Add to that, more detailed tactical options. All of these things were left out to make the game far easier to play, and understand, and that's fantastic - it's 5E's biggest standpoint. But adding OPTIONAL content source material for people who want more out of the core system, is never a terrible idea.

I'm pretty sure the DM's Guild has a number of options like this, some of them being best sellers.
 

Xaelvaen

Stuck in the 90s
I'm pretty sure the DM's Guild has a number of options like this, some of them being best sellers.

There's a few of them, most of them are more about adding character options (the Talent options, for example). I'm talking more about adding rules for different ways to approach tactical combat in this particular thread. Then again, I've not been to the DM's guild in many months, so I suppose you could be right about them having delved into those options as well. At my table, we gutted and overhauled 5E so much it is barely recognizable anymore, so we don't quite pay much attention to DM's guild often. Much like the OP, we grew quite tired of a "barebones" system and went all out in its redesign.

We tend to do this. We're crunch-monkies around here.
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
There's a few of them, most of them are more about adding character options (the Talent options, for example). I'm talking more about adding rules for different ways to approach tactical combat in this particular thread. Then again, I've not been to the DM's guild in many months, so I suppose you could be right about them having delved into those options as well. At my table, we gutted and overhauled 5E so much it is barely recognizable anymore, so we don't quite pay much attention to DM's guild often. Much like the OP, we grew quite tired of a "barebones" system and went all out in its redesign.

We tend to do this. We're crunch-monkies around here.

Why play 5E if you have to rewrite it? There are plenty of other systems out there. Iron Kingdoms, Shadow of The Demon Lord, or even just older editions or Pathfinder.

While 5E works for me since I prefer more of a rules light, if I needed more than a few twists here and there along with a couple of minor rules tweaks I'd probably go shopping.
 

Xaelvaen

Stuck in the 90s
Why play 5E if you have to rewrite it? There are plenty of other systems out there. Iron Kingdoms, Shadow of The Demon Lord, or even just older editions or Pathfinder.

While 5E works for me since I prefer more of a rules light, if I needed more than a few twists here and there along with a couple of minor rules tweaks I'd probably go shopping.

The core mechanic works well, and the rules light allows it to be very modular based on the setting we're playing in at any given point in time. We rewrite any given section to suit our needs of the moment.

Example; Science Fiction setting, we use Skill Point distribution to a wider list of skills (using proficiency doubled representing expertise) as a cap. It simply works better to illustrate the characters we create in our science fiction setting.

The core mechanic, and the underlying freedom it provides, aren't broken. We create what we want, because we're allowed to, and it is easier than fixing other, more complex systems that are broken in other ways that would take far more time and effort to customize to our ever-changing needs. The beauty of having a group that can meticulously change what we want, when we want, regardless of the intent of the designer, is that we owe nothing to anyone but ourselves - and it is fairly cost efficient to boot.
 


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