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5E Tired of doing WotC's job

Stormonu

Hero
Beyond lycanthropy, can you use Detect Magic to sense an animated skeleton? A doppleganger? A vampire? A summoned creature? A golem? A dragon? A polymorphed gold dragon disguising as a human? I'd probably allow it for the skeleton (if it had been animated by a spell), the golem, the summoned monster and the polymorphed dragon, but probably not for the others, unless they had active spells on them. Couldn't use a Detect Magic to root out a doppleganger, for example. But that isn't backed by anything other than gut feeling and a sense to preserve certain story tropes.
 

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Lanefan

Victoria Rules
Beyond lycanthropy, can you use Detect Magic to sense an animated skeleton? A doppleganger? A vampire? A summoned creature? A golem? A dragon? A polymorphed gold dragon disguising as a human? I'd probably allow it for the skeleton (if it had been animated by a spell), the golem, the summoned monster and the polymorphed dragon, but probably not for the others, unless they had active spells on them. Couldn't use a Detect Magic to root out a doppleganger, for example. But that isn't backed by anything other than gut feeling and a sense to preserve certain story tropes.
I might allow it to pull the summoned creature from that list, but that's it (assuming the dragon's polymorph to be an innate ability and assuming no active spells sitting on any of them).
 



I think I'd prefer the PHB to have prices for a cloak.

At least that way the player can just do their own maths and write it on their character sheet without wasting game time asking pointless questions.
 

Sabathius42

Bree-Yark
We like at least a vague nod to realism in our games, which in this case includes that if you want to have something like a bag of marbles on hand you need to have had enough forethought to pick it up ahead of time.

That, and the "just happen to have" idea completely dismisses the otherwise very realistic frustration of "oh, if only we had...", which forces players/PCs to either improvise a replacement or to abandon that idea for something else. (in last night's session, for example, the PCs needed to pry open a door and nobody had any suitable tools at all on hand; so they improvised with daggers, and a few bent-and-now-useless daggers later they got it open)
Once again....we assume everyone has things that every adventurer carries around. A few torches. Flint and tender, a bedroll, a few empty sacks, twine, etc...

Bag of marbles clearly sits outside that line, as well as spyglasses or blank bound books, or ship navigation tools.

I assume that extra torches, spare arrows, weapon oil, etc are picked up and replenished along the way.
 

Eis

Explorer
I mean, clothes have an entry in the phb though, it was linked in the first page of this thread

can you imagine two designers sitting across from each other at a desk..."dude, how much should I make a cloak?"

"I dunno man, like 5 sp?"

"what about a cape? wait, whats the difference between a cloak and a cape anyway?"

"fffffff, I don't know just make it the same price, we have to get this stuff done"

"ok, now on to coat, do you think I have to specify like a winter coat?"
 


I think I'd prefer the PHB to have prices for a cloak.

At least that way the player can just do their own maths and write it on their character sheet without wasting game time asking pointless questions.
If your character has traveller's clothes, then they have a cloak. Just as they have boots and a belt to hold up their pants. Listing each induvial item separately is a waste of time and space on a character sheet.
 

Helldritch

Adventurer
I get what the OP meant. 5ed is a rough gem by design. It is an uncut gem but a gem nonetheless. For many, it is the occasion to facet the gem/game to their taste. For some, the missing facets of the gem are irritating and become an obsession. The OP has his focus on the "missing" facets and it became hard for him to focus on anything else.

This is what I call a DM's overwork syndrome. Take time off from DMing. It has nothing to do with 5ed. You do not need 30+ pages of house rule. You need none. Give yourself some time off and when you get back to DMing. You'll see if it really is as you're thinking right now.
 



Lem23

Explorer
There’s definitely been a fundamental change in the nature of what an RPG is over the last 20 years or so. Used to be tweaking and houseruling your game was part of playing it. It was fun! Now it’s “WotC's job”.
I'm not sure that's a fundamental change at all - more one person's attitude that may have changed. The majority of the posts here in reply suggest that others have not made any such change.
 

Aldarc

Legend
Either way, more and more people seem to think the Game designers should be telling them everything. That's silly.
I would not call it "silly." It's a matter of personal preference regarding how much prep work or pre-existing materials exist. I may not share the OP's preference, but I think that it's important to sympathize with how 5e is able to meet or fails to meet different playstyles and preferences.

There’s definitely been a fundamental change in the nature of what an RPG is over the last 20 years or so. Used to be tweaking and houseruling your game was part of playing it. It was fun! Now it’s “WotC's job”.
But he also is reminiscing of pre-WotC editions of D&D, so I'm not sure if this quite fits the OP's situation.
 

Charlaquin

Goblin Queen
Beyond lycanthropy, can you use Detect Magic to sense an animated skeleton? A doppleganger? A vampire? A summoned creature? A golem? A dragon? A polymorphed gold dragon disguising as a human? I'd probably allow it for the skeleton (if it had been animated by a spell), the golem, the summoned monster and the polymorphed dragon, but probably not for the others, unless they had active spells on them. Couldn't use a Detect Magic to root out a doppleganger, for example. But that isn't backed by anything other than gut feeling and a sense to preserve certain story tropes.
I pretty much agree with your rulings on these, though I’m not 100% sold on the shapeshifted dragon. If it’s shapeshifted with a polymorph spell, then definitely, but if it’s an innate ability the dragon has (like the doppelgänger’s innate shapeshifting) then probably not.
 

Reynard

Legend
There’s definitely been a fundamental change in the nature of what an RPG is over the last 20 years or so. Used to be tweaking and houseruling your game was part of playing it. It was fun! Now it’s “WotC's job”.
I don't think this is any different than when I first started in 1985. Ever GM and table is different. Some want more detail, others want less. There are ancient grognard GMs that refused to allow anything not printed in the book, and brand new GMs that happily make up cloak prices on the fly, and every step between. I would say if anything that the real change has been in how people approach the entertainment of RPGs and that has led to some very interesting perspectives on what they are and how they aught to be played.
 

TwoSix

The hero you deserve
Supporter
But he also is reminiscing of pre-WotC editions of D&D, so I'm not sure if this quite fits the OP's situation.
Yea, nostalgia for 20th century gaming has multiple threads to it; there's the aspects of "the DM as ultimate arbiter and homebrewer", but there's also the tons of games (including AD&D) that had strong focuses on detailed simulationism, with tons of charts and tables and specific rules. OP is more nostalgic for the latter.

It's interesting to contrast with most modern games, in which the game engine is much more specific and curated and has the general expectation that all the players (including the GM) will run the game as written; but specific details are generally handwaved away. (Unless the game is specifically focused on equipment tracking as part of the game, as with some hybrids of newer games and OSR mentality.)
 

I think I'd prefer the PHB to have prices for a cloak.

At least that way the player can just do their own maths and write it on their character sheet without wasting game time asking pointless questions.
What ho:
This set of clothes could consist of boots, a wool skirt or breeches, a sturdy belt, a shirt (perhaps with a vest or jacket), and an ample cloak with a hood.
 

jasper

Rotten DM
New spell first level. Detect Lycanthropy Range 30. You detect were creatures. Material component. Hair of a dog.
****
Stormonu does point out where this Detect Magic argument will go. And I had the argument back in AD&D. I would allow the skeleton if a spell, but not the others. As magical disguises etc would go out the window. I did try back in AD&D is having Xanth magic items to throw off the pcs casting detect magic every 60 feet.
Vvv
I agree with Sabthius42, up to 3E we had a standard adventurers backpack/load out. And I generally charged 10 GP reloading fee if did cover shopping when the pcs were in the city.
 

Well, it has been a while since I've posted on Enworld. After 18 months of 5E, I think I am soon to be done with it. Honestly, I am sick and tired of doing the game designers' work for them.

...

Compared to the amount of information in prior editions, 5E is severely lacking. We all know that the idea was to allow players to play how they want, but making up the rules and the systems for the game because they aren't there in the first place is just getting annoying IMO.

...

I know in prior editions we house-ruled stuff, but I have four times as many house-rules and such for 5E than any other edition I've ever played. And a lot of this might be for (what I consider) a better balanced game, but a lot of it is for standard stuff.
Being a D&D designer must be an ungrateful job... make one decision, gamers protest you didn't make the opposite one, make the opposite and they'll protest you didn't make the first, let them choose and they protest you didn't choose for them.
 

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