• COMING SOON! -- The Awfully Cheerful Engine on Kickstarter! An action comedy RPG inspired by cheerful tabletop games of the 80s! With a foreword by Sandy 'Ghostbusters' Petersen, and VTT support!
log in or register to remove this ad

 

D&D General Tyrannosaurs were pack hunters. Stay away from the Isle of Dread.


I'm guessing the Isle of Dread -- which is crazy big, once you start counting hexes -- could probably handle one pack of T. Rexes. Still, that would be enough. I imagine their territory would be picked clean pretty quickly, requiring them to move in search of new prey periodically. The human tribes would likely have the migration timeline down to a near-science, as it would make hunting beyond the wall untenable while the pack was in the area.
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Sacrosanct

Legend
Last Saturday I took the kid to the dino exhibit at OMSI. the pictures don't do it justice. When you're standing next to a life sized T REX, it becomes clear we'd be an easy snack. CR8 seems low when you're face to face with how big they are lol

1618860345380.png
 

grimslade

Adventurer
I was watching a wake of turkey vultures claiming some roadkill. Biggish bird, but social. They stripped that carcass almost bare in less than 10 minutes. I imagine T-Rex would look similar festooned with plumage sharing a kill. Now imagine a family of Zombie Tyrannosaurs belching out zombies of random sizes.
 

Mind of tempest

Adventurer
I was watching a wake of turkey vultures claiming some roadkill. Biggish bird, but social. They stripped that carcass almost bare in less than 10 minutes. I imagine T-Rex would look similar festooned with plumage sharing a kill. Now imagine a family of Zombie Tyrannosaurs belching out zombies of random sizes.
apparently, Trex is likely largely fatherless for much the same reason as elephants are, polar Trex are technically a possibility if you want to really doom your players so if you like either look you got options.
 



J.Quondam

90% grunts. 10% thews.
I was watching a wake of turkey vultures claiming some roadkill. Biggish bird, but social. They stripped that carcass almost bare in less than 10 minutes. I imagine T-Rex would look similar festooned with plumage sharing a kill. Now imagine a family of Zombie Tyrannosaurs belching out zombies of random sizes.

Welp, now I'm totally in the mood for quick "Return to the Isle of Dread" sidequest, wherein the party sails to an island they visited long ago, only to find it utterly barren, picked completely clean by a flock of ravening TRexes.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
The amount of area dinos in general would need is often quite underestimated. The islands on Jurassic Park probably could not sustain anything near the number of animals they had.

Which is why my version of The Isle of Dread is closer to the size of Australia. :)

You might be surprised it's plausible.

Wrangle Island supported a remnant population of Mammoth until the Egyptians built the pyramids.

The South Island of New Zealand supported the Haast Eagle and Moa which could reach 3 metres. Both died out within 100 years of Humans arriving.

Isle of Dread is quite large as well. My province is the size of Belgium and I think the Isle is about as big as that and Canterbury (NZ) put togather.

That's big enough to have 3000 metre high mountains and in the good old days supported native bush etc.
 

Davies

Adventurer
And this is all part of the reason that I prefer to treat 'dinosaurs' in fantasy as though they were just monsters that look like earlier conceptions of dinosaurs, rather than embracing everything that modern paleontology says about them.
 


And this is all part of the reason that I prefer to treat 'dinosaurs' in fantasy as though they were just monsters that look like earlier conceptions of dinosaurs, rather than embracing everything that modern paleontology says about them.
I dunno, pack-hunting tyrannosaurs sound amazing to me. Well, as a DM. I suspect my players will disagree.
 


I mean either way, the issue with T rexes on the Isle of Dread is that Tyrannosaurus lived in either the subtropical flood-plain that was Hell Creek, or the semi-arid plains at their southern reaches.

Meanwhile the Isle of Dread is mostly jungle which is just, not Tyrannosaurus rex territory at all.

Either way though, while interesting for Teratophonus, not really something you can apply to Tyrannosaurus. Teratophonus was much smaller than its larger relative, so while it probably hunted in packs, its much larger cousin didn't have much need to
 

Frozen_Heart

Explorer
And this is all part of the reason that I prefer to treat 'dinosaurs' in fantasy as though they were just monsters that look like earlier conceptions of dinosaurs, rather than embracing everything that modern paleontology says about them.
I love the modern stuff palaeontology states about them. It makes them out to be weird and wonderful creatures with tons of variety, rather than 15 flavours of large lizard with slightly different shapes.

Modern spinosaurus is a real trip.
 

Frozen_Heart

Explorer
apparently, Trex is likely largely fatherless for much the same reason as elephants are, polar Trex are technically a possibility if you want to really doom your players so if you like either look you got options.
It might have had sparse hairs much like modern elephants do, but yeah the current thought is that is was largely bare skinned, rather than having proper feathers.
 

Jaeger

That someone better.
Everything about how they really behaved is so speculative, and unprovable, we will just never know...

Last Saturday I took the kid to the dino exhibit at OMSI. the pictures don't do it justice. When you're standing next to a life sized T REX, it becomes clear we'd be an easy snack. CR8 seems low when you're face to face with how big they are lol ...

Hell yes.

Ask anyone who has done some hunting. Dino's are B.I.G.

This is one of the ways our computer games, cartoons, RPG's and fiction just flat out LIE to us.

No party of normal sized people is going to kill a T-Rex with hand weapons and a bow in the typical D&D combat fashion...

But it is D&D fantasy. So enter the magic user for the CR8 win.

But yeah, last time I was in a museum it became readily apparent that even with modern firearms it would be very difficult to live in the Cretaceous. If it was just the big dinosaurs that would be one thing. But it is all the smaller dino's and the crazy prehistoric fish that make no place safe.
 

Davies

Adventurer
I love the modern stuff palaeontology states about them. It makes them out to be weird and wonderful creatures with tons of variety, rather than 15 flavours of large lizard with slightly different shapes.
I do, too, but it all makes it hard to do some classic adventure stories!
 

erc1971

Explorer
Last Saturday I took the kid to the dino exhibit at OMSI. the pictures don't do it justice. When you're standing next to a life sized T REX, it becomes clear we'd be an easy snack. CR8 seems low when you're face to face with how big they are lol

View attachment 135785
I remember seeing a Tyrannosaurus rex fossil at the Toronto Museum a few years ago. I mirror your sentiment, those things were huge!
 

Oofta

Title? I don't need no stinkin' title.
You might be surprised it's plausible.

Wrangle Island supported a remnant population of Mammoth until the Egyptians built the pyramids.

The South Island of New Zealand supported the Haast Eagle and Moa which could reach 3 metres. Both died out within 100 years of Humans arriving.

Isle of Dread is quite large as well. My province is the size of Belgium and I think the Isle is about as big as that and Canterbury (NZ) put togather.

That's big enough to have 3000 metre high mountains and in the good old days supported native bush etc.
Based on @Whizbang Dustyboots post, The Isle of Dread is 39,600 square miles. New Zealand (which is probably the minimum you'd need for Jurassic Park) is over 100,000 square miles. The Moa weighed around 500 lbs. The mammoths that lived on Wrangel Island mammoths were smaller than most mammoths, although not small enough to be considered island dwarfs, so probably around 10,000 pounds give or take.

So yes, some large animals lived on relatively small areas, but the big sauropods like apatosaurus weighed around 40,000 pounds and T Rex weighed around 15,000 pounds. Even a triceratops probably weighed around 20-24,000 pounds. Dinosaurs were huge.

An island close to the size of The Isle of Dread did exist in the late Cretaceous, Hateg Island. However, except for pterosaurs it could only support dwarf versions of the dinosaurs. So yes, I think The Isle of Dread is too small. B-)
 

Steampunkette

Adventurer
Worth noting: T-Rex didn't have a Larynx. It had a Syrinx.

1280px-Syrinx_Bucerotidae.jpg

This means they couldn't "Roar" like we'd imagine. The closest they could do is move air through their syrinx back and forth while trying to hold it close (The Syrinx is where the windpipe splits for each lung to connect).

The real sound they made would be something like a deep humming at improbably bassy levels.


Wear headphones. And imagine this sound coming after you. There would be no one living on the Isle of Dread. They'd all die from being paralyzed by the brown note, then get eaten.
 

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top