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D&D General What About Those Other D&D Settings?

havard

Adventurer
The old settings for the new generations are too "generic". We are talking about a fandom too used to lots of fantasy MMOs. Even a famous franchise as Blizzard's Diablo suffers the end of its old days of glory. At least Dark Sun could mark the difference.

WotC is not so interested into to sell a product for nostalgic collectors, but to attract new players/consumers. The settings what return should offer something Forgotten Realms couldn't.

Look at the most successful fan franchise today: The Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Did they stop using Iron Man because some of his stories were seen as "problematic"? Did they stop using Captain America because he was seen as too generic and old fashioned? Did they decide never to use Man Thing or Ego The Living Planet because they were too obscure?

The D&D worlds are WotC's Marvel Characters. Potentially they could generate tons of wealth for the company. They could create separate "skins" on DNDBeyond depending on which setting you are using. Treat them as Harry Potter Houses or Team Jacob vs. Team vs. Team Edward from Twilight.

If they were smart, they would bring every setting back. But they have to make them good. At this point, how many people work as permanent D&D staff?
 

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bedir than

Full Moon Storyteller
The D&D worlds are WotC's Marvel Characters. Potentially they could generate tons of wealth for the company. They could create separate "skins" on DNDBeyond depending on which setting you are using. Treat them as Harry Potter Houses or Team Jacob vs. Team vs. Team Edward from Twilight
I think this misunderstands the modern player. They aren't looking for the dictat from WotC to tell them how their table and world should be.

They are playing original characters in original worlds, because it's the play at their table that matters - not Ed Greenwood or Keith Baker or Jeff Grubb
 

Retreater

Legend
I think this misunderstands the modern player. They aren't looking for the dictat from WotC to tell them how their table and world should be.

They are playing original characters in original worlds, because it's the play at their table that matters - not Ed Greenwood or Keith Baker or Jeff Grubb
They're also likely running homebrew adventures that research says last a couple months, yet we still get massive levels 1-13 campaign adventures.
D&D fans buy a lot of stuff, even when they don't play it.
 

Clint_L

Legend
Whatever they do for Greyhawk, I want there to be a deluxe edition that comes with lots of historical material. Maybe hire Jon Peterson (Game Wizards) to write a condensed history of how the game started, emphasizing the importance of Greyhawk and Blackmoore (which should be included as an adventure setting) in the creation and evolution of D&D. Really give Arneson, Gygax and friends their flowers, and keep that story alive for new generations of players.

I think that kind of deluxe edition would sell well, but I also think it is important to pass those roots on. D&D isn't just a game, it's a culture. The 50th needs to celebrate it as such.
 

Zaukrie

New Publisher
I would prefer new settings. If we get an old one back, Nentyr is great. One of the issues with lots of settings is support. I really think one reason 5e has legs is it's generic setting. While I don't like it, it makes running any adventures anywhere easy.
 


WotC owns the rights to everything that matters in order to publish new Blackmoor material.

Older settings are often seen as generic because everything that came later borrowed their main features from them. I think it would be possible to make them feel distinct again, but I would do it through art, layout and presentation.

But fantasy has evolved today into something very different than fantasy was in 1970. That is something that could be leaned into in order to highlight those features. Or you could also lean into the concept of "Feudal Knights uncover crashed spaceship while under attack by Vikings". In any case, if you want to make it awesome, you can. :)


-Havard
There actually isn't actually that much Blackmoor material published though. Most of the setting is just inferred from a handful of adventures. It's similar to Netir Vale, the Radiant Citadel settings, and Arcavios in that respect.

Not that that is a bad thing, any of those could be expanded upon.
 

overgeeked

B/X Known World
I love Al-Qadim, and while it desperately needs an update from someone with roots in middle eastern/Arabic culture, I don’t think it’s unsalvageable. There’s a long YouTube series where a couple of Arabic gamers do exactly that, in fact. WotC won’t touch it in a million years though.
Since it's officially part of the Forgotten Realms it's already open on the DM's Guild and has already had several sourcebooks made for it.

The Asians Represent Podcast did a read through.


Some of the people from those videos were involved in a rework of the setting that's up on DM's Guild.

 

havard

Adventurer
I think this misunderstands the modern player. They aren't looking for the dictat from WotC to tell them how their table and world should be.

They are playing original characters in original worlds, because it's the play at their table that matters - not Ed Greenwood or Keith Baker or Jeff Grubb


What you are saying has nothing to do with modern players. Players and DMs have been doing this for 50 years.

But this isn't about what they want. This is about what WotC can do that will make them money. And if teenagers today are wearing t-shirts of Metallica and ACDC, I see no reason why they wouldn't wear a T-shirt with Dark Sun or Dragonlance.

These are powerful brands that WotC could make a lot of money off if they knew how to do it.

I mean they are making toys off the old D&D Cartoon so there is that...

They're also likely running homebrew adventures that research says last a couple months, yet we still get massive levels 1-13 campaign adventures.
D&D fans buy a lot of stuff, even when they don't play it.

Absolutely. :)

And older fans? Remember, these are the fans who have the money. Don't discard them either. The surveys might be useful to WotC, but the vast majority of D&D fans don't respond to surveys. What is new about D&D fans today is that it is a larger group than it ever was before, with a wide range of preferences.

People don't like setting info? Look at the popularity of Lore videos on youtube and other platforms.

Older fans can also be used for free marketing. Sure, many complain if they deliver a bad product. But maybe WotC just needs to up their game when it comes to what they are delivering.

-Havard
 

havard

Adventurer
There actually isn't actually that much Blackmoor material published though. Most of the setting is just inferred from a handful of adventures. It's similar to Netir Vale, the Radiant Citadel settings, and Arcavios in that respect.

Not that that is a bad thing, any of those could be expanded upon.

Perhaps, but if you look at the four modules that TSR put out, they contain information that is enough for at least 8 WotC style Hard Cover books.

If they really wanted to, they could probably buy the rights to the ZGG d20 Blackmoor line. If they wanted to.

What Blackmoor has is name recognition and history.

Should they make a 50 year anniversary of Castle Blackmoor? As a colletor item, I think it would make them a lot of money.

-Havard
 

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