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Which books do you re-read regularly?


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Mad_Jack

Adventurer
I've plowed my way through the Honor Harrington novels by David Weber a couple times, as well as Steven Erikson's Malazan Book of the Fallen series, and the Hawk & Fisher and Nightside books by Simon R. Green... Usually every five years or so, I get the urge to go back through each of them.
Watchmen gets read at least every two years, as does V for Vendetta.

There aren't really that many things I reread more than once or twice, though. Usually by then I have the whole story stuck in my head and don't really need the books anymore - I can just play it in my head like a movie.

I've read most of the Dresden Files books twice.
The Hobbit and LotR have both been read about three times. Seems to be a ten-year thing.
The three main Dragonlance novels three times.
J. Michael Straczinski's Rising Stars novels three times.
Most of Nancy A. Collins' Sonja Blue novels four times.
Sergei Lukyanenko's Nightwatch series three times.
Lillith Saintcrow's Bannon & Clare novels three times.
And Austin Grossman's novel Soon I Will Be Invincible has been read three times, although I forsee rereading it again at least once more - it's just frackin' hysterical.
 

MarkB

Legend
I've got out of the habit of reading as much in the last few years (I more often buy books on Audilble now) but one series I found very re-readable are Lois McMaster Bujold's Vorkosigan novels. There are very few I haven't read at least a couple of times, and I've re-read Memory, Komarr and A Civil Campaign several times.

Aside from that, I'll often re-read (or re-listen) a series when the next novel is due to come out. I did that recently with the Dresden Files series, and before that the Rivers of London series.
 




Morley_Dotes

Villager
As much as I like Cook I picked up the first Garrett book but couldn't finish it. I'll give it another go soon.
I had a similar problem but on the other end. I tried to read through The Black Company but couldn't get through book 1. I plan to go back to them at some point and try again. One of the things I like about the Garrett books is that there are 2 stories going on if you read through more of the books. There is the story that Garrett is going through and then there is the story of the city-state of TunFaire and the social impact of the changes the city goes through; and how Garrett and friends adapt to them. Also, I've pulled some of the story plots from the books into my D&D games.
 

dragoner

Dying in Chargen
Roadside Picnic by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky
Use of Weapons by Iain M Banks
Next most likely will be Revelation Space by Alastair Reynolds
 

Blue

Ravenous Bugblatter Beast of Traal
The Vorkosigan Saga by Lois McMaster Bujold. The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher. The first part of the Honor Harrington series by David Weber. The Dragon Never Sleeps by Glen Cook. The Wearing the Cape series by Marion Harmon. Soon I will Be Invincible by Austin Grossman. The Starfire loosely connected series by Weber and White. The Moon is Harsh Mistress by Robert Heinlein. The robot and the foundation series-es by Asimov. Gentleman Bastards series by Scott Lynch. The Chronicles of Amber by Robert Zelazny. (Well, the first Chronicles are my reread, and they I feel guilty if I don't reread the second chronicles while I'm there.) The War of the Oaks by Emma Bull. Snowcrash, Diamond Age, and Zodiak by Neal Stephenson. Tigana by Guy Gavriel Kay.

Lots of my favorites not on that list (though many are), and it does have a lot of my guilty pleasure reads like the Honor Harrington novels, though while I've read everything I now stop rereads when it gets toooooo Mary Sue. A notice that a lot of my previous re-reads have fallen off in the past decade, and only a few new ones have gone one but some of the series has gotten longer.

EDIT: Have to thank @Hungry Hobbit for reminding me. Julian's May's Saga of the Exiles and the few "modern day" books around it are also part of my reread. I bought a hardcover set of the 4 Exiles books plus a companion book for $10 off a street vendor in NYC a few decades back, and when I opened them up to look they were signed, numbered editions out of 500. In rough shape on the outside, but still really cool.
 
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Campbell

Legend
Chronicles of the Black Company
Chronicles of Amber (particularly the first cycle where Corwin is the protagonist)
Dune
The Witcher Short Stories and Novels (particularly the short stories)
Tanith Lee's Tales From the Flat Earth series
The Book of the New Son by Gene Wolf
 


Marc_C

Solo Role Playing
I've got out of the habit of reading as much in the last few years (I more often buy books on Audilble now) but one series I found very re-readable are Lois McMaster Bujold's Vorkosigan novels. There are very few I haven't read at least a couple of times, and I've re-read Memory, Komarr and A Civil Campaign several times.

Aside from that, I'll often re-read (or re-listen) a series when the next novel is due to come out. I did that recently with the Dresden Files series, and before that the Rivers of London series.
Vorkosigan is great! When I'm stuck in a waiting room it's the first books I think of to pass time enjoyably. Have your read the one with his cousin, Captain Ivan Vorpatril, as the lead? It's really funny.
 




MarkB

Legend
Have your read the one with his cousin, Captain Ivan Vorpatril, as the lead? It's really funny.
Indeed I have, it was most enjoyable. I also liked her book about Cordelia Naismith-Vorkosigan's new romance.

They did feel a little low-stakes, though. It's something I've noticed in a few long-running series over the years - at some point, it seems like the author can no longer bear to seriously hurt their characters.

Anne McCaffrey's Perm novels were the same way - after The White Dragon, the stakes seem to drop off rapidly.
 





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