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D&D 5E Wizards is hiring a senior game designer for Dungeons & Dragons

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ReshiIRE

Adventurer
Yes they do. People deserve to be paid according to the scarcity of their skills, rarity and production. They absolutely deserve to be poor if their life goals are designed around staying poor. Choices have consequences.

There are plenty of people who would love to be RPG designers as such the pay should be very low and I will bet they get tens of thousands of applications for this job. Heck I would love to do it, but I would rather keep my high salary as an aerospace engineer and let WOTC pay someone else to do it for $50k a year and I will play what they design, while having money left over for other things.
You are so deeply ignorant of what poverty is like and many peoples experiences of life and education. Nobody chooses to be poor and the vast majority of people just want to work a fair day's work for a fair day's wage. Though that shouldn't matter either; the worth of human life is not determined by their labour.

Nobody should experience poverty, no matter whether they work or not or what they work at.

I'd prefer to play games knowing artists getting proper compensation rather than experience the shite many do right now.
 

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Galandris

Foggy Bottom Campaign Setting Fan
I am actually still surprised how low the number is. Though a great many more attend, but don't get a degree. When you get into masters and PHDs, the numbers get really low.

It's the population over 25. It takes time for the population who retire now (and who started working in the 70 early 80's where higher level education was rarer) to... no longer be part of the statistics. I guess the 25-35 age group would yield a much higher percentage.
 

dave2008

Legend
It should be part of the listing period, it's not needed for the job, it should be there at all, the message to the none university educated is clear, we're not wanted.
That is on you then. My wife applied for a job in which she didn't meet all the qualifications, but was exceptional in others. She nailed the interview and got the job. You can't be put of by the qualifications list if you think you can do a job.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
I am actually still surprised how low the number is. Though a great many more attend, but don't get a degree. When you get into masters and PHDs, the numbers get really low.
Not at all to sound snide, but College sn't necessarily for everyone. My childhood best friend, the best man at my wedding, bounced off of the whole College system hard despite being very intelligent. He landed on his feet, but it just didn't fit what he wanted to do.

The really weird thing is if you look at the numbers pre-WW2, they are similar but bumped down a degree: high school graduates were about 42% of the population, and people with Bachelors degrees were as common as Masters degrees now.
 


ReshiIRE

Adventurer
College and university should be accessible to all (and I think entry requirements should often be reformed; they are people who do not do well in primary and secondary shcool but would do well in their college course of choice, and these people often do miss out), but it also should not be seen as a necessity. It is clear there are many for whom a trade might be more appropriate.

Though as well as that, nobody should suffer no matter what they work at; we are in a position across the world to eliminate absolute and relative poverty, and should be striving to do so.
 

ReshiIRE

Adventurer
Back to the topic:

Wizards must be continuing to expand. I wonder what releases they will be prioritising next as a result of hiring more people.

I also wonder if they're going to get really ambitious and perhaps consider getting another D&D related system up for a different style of gamer - but I highly doubt that. More likely that they need mroe people for D&D 2024.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
College and university should be accessible to all (and I think entry requirements should often be reformed; they are people who do not do well in primary and secondary shcool but would do well in their college course of choice, and these people often do miss out), but it also should not be seen as a necessity. It is clear there are many for whom a trade might be more appropriate.

Though as well as that, nobody should suffer no matter what they work at; we are in a position across the world to eliminate absolute and relative poverty, and should be striving to do so.
Agreed 100%: my friend who bounced off College had the ability to do so in a relatively safe Community College environment before moving on. Can't say enough good about the Community College system in this country.
 


MGibster

Legend
They are more...guidelines.
Sort of. While it's true that there's no law requiring the company to strictly adhere to their own qualifications for the position, if the company is willing to make an exception for an applicant who say only had 5 years of experience, well, they need to make that same exception for every applicant that only has 5 years of experience as well. Failure to do so not only can it leave the company vulnerable to litigation, but may alienate current employees who didn't apply because they didn't meet the minimum qualifications for the position. And from a DEI perspective it's a bad idea.
 

Parmandur

Book-Friend
Sort of. While it's true that there's no law requiring the company to strictly adhere to their own qualifications for the position, if the company is willing to make an exception for an applicant who say only had 5 years of experience, well, they need to make that same exception for every applicant that only has 5 years of experience as well. Failure to do so not only can it leave the company vulnerable to litigation, but may alienate current employees who didn't apply because they didn't meet the minimum qualifications for the position. And from a DEI perspective it's a bad idea.
Yeah, less accepting less experience, but being open to substitutes is a different matter.
 

dave2008

Legend
Not at all to sound snide, but College sn't necessarily for everyone. My childhood best friend, the best man at my wedding, bounced off of the whole College system hard despite being very intelligent. He landed on his feet, but it just didn't fit what he wanted to do.
I agree completely. I actually think traditional US high school isn't really for everyone and we need to invest more in vocational schools.
The really weird thing is if you look at the numbers pre-WW2, they are similar but bumped down a degree: high school graduates were about 42% of the population, and people with Bachelors degrees were as common as Masters degrees now.
I remember that too. It still seems surprising to me when I think about it though.
 
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Scribe

Hero
Other forms of unjustified discrimination are banned, so should this be. It's a form of shifting out the lower classes, and folks that aren't like them. Over representation of the university educated in MSM is already a huge problem, especially in journalism as is.
What discrimination?

Get a loan. Work. Get Arts Degree.

It's not like they are telling you to get a Masters and self Publish a million dollar kickstarter.
 

From personal experience, and no further details will be given in a public forum to those that haven't met me irl, I know for a fact that the lack of the specific degree is not necessary at Wizards. They absolutely will look at many years of successful experience instead of the degree and then grant interviews towards various positions (even several rounds of interviews).

If you do not have the degree but have the experience, apply. Their algorithms will not ignore you for lack of degree. If your resume is well written and crafted you'll get a real recruiter to give a look. They'll likely screen you over the phone before advancing to the hiring manager.

This is common throughout the Puget Sound region's companies as well
 

MGibster

Legend
From personal experience, and no further details will be given in a public forum to those that haven't met me irl, I know for a fact that the lack of the specific degree is not necessary at Wizards. They absolutely will look at many years of successful experience instead of the degree and then grant interviews towards various positions (even several rounds of interviews).
My current HR position has a minimum qualification of a bachelor's degree in business administration (or something related), any bachelor's degree with three years of experience in HR, or five years of experience in HR. At least for most HR positions I'm familiar with, hiring managers value the years of experience more than they value the degree. I have absolutely no problem believing WotC will value a candidate's work experience.
 

ECMO3

Hero
You are so deeply ignorant of what poverty is like and many peoples experiences of life and education. Nobody chooses to be poor and the vast majority of people just want to work a fair day's work for a fair day's wage. Though that shouldn't matter either; the worth of human life is not determined by their labour.

Nobody should experience poverty, no matter whether they work or not or what they work at.

I'd prefer to play games knowing artists getting proper compensation rather than experience the shite many do right now.
To start with, I have lived in poverty, real poverty, not this fake American poverty, where you have an iphone, a roof over your head that doesn't leak and enough food to actually be freaking obese, but you still claim to be "living in poverty".

The term "poor" is relative and few if any game designers at WOTC are truely experiencing real poverty, and certainly none that will be accepted for this position are. They are only "poor" in the same fashion as teachers, police, social workers and other professions that do not demand a high wage. They do not deserve to make more money than they do.

People make choices and those choices have consequences. If you choose to be a teacher or choose to be an RPG desinger or you choose not to take a good paying job because it is against your morals or ethics then there are financial consequences associated with those actions and you will be "poorer" than others who do not make such life decisions.

Someone with the creativity and editing skills necessary to be a lead game designer at WOTC and do it well could do a lot of things that would make a lot more money, they choose not to. That might be the right decision, it might be the wrong decision. They might be happier with it, they might be depressed with it but it is a decision with consequences, both financial and otherwise.
 
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BookTenTiger

He / Him
People make choices and those choices have consequences. If you choose to be a teacher or choose to be an RPG desinger or you choose not to take a good paying job because it is against your morals or ethics then there are financial consequences associated with those actions and you will be "poorer" than others who did not make such decisions.
Let's imagine, for a moment, that there's a teacher (cough, cough) participating on EN World who then reads this. Do you really think this is a respectful way to talk about other people? I deserve less money because I'm a teacher?
 

J.Quondam

CR 1/8
To start with, I have lived in poverty, real poverty, not this fake American poverty, where you have an iphone, enough food to be overweight and a roof over your head but still claim to be "living in poverty".

The term "poor" is relative and few if any game designers at WOTC are truely experiencing poverty, and certainly none that will be accepted for this position are. They are only "poor" in the same fashion as teachers, police, social workers and other professions that do not demand a high wage. They do not deserve to make more money than they do.

People make choices and those choices have consequences. If you choose to be a teacher or choose to be an RPG desinger or you choose not to take a good paying job because it is against your morals or ethics then there are financial consequences associated with those actions and you will be "poorer" than others who do not make such life decisions.

Someone with the creativity and editing skills necessary to be a lead game designer and do it well could do a lot of things that would make a lot more money, they choose not to. That might be the right decision, it might be the wrong decision. They might be happier with it, they might be depressed with it but it is a decision with consequences, both financial and otherwise.
Yes, choices have consequences. And yes, society has attached some arbitrary monetary "value" on people's job & life choices.
That absolutely does not mean anyone "deserves to be poor."
 

ECMO3

Hero
Let's imagine, for a moment, that there's a teacher (cough, cough) participating on EN World who then reads this. Do you really think this is a respectful way to talk about other people? I deserve less money because I'm a teacher?
I don't think I am treating teachers, or police or social workers bad. They don't make as much money as other professions with comparable skills or education. That is fact and the UFT and most teachers would agree with me on that.

It is more respectful to be honest with people than it is to be deceitful and pretend things are different than they are.
 

ECMO3

Hero
Yes, choices have consequences. And yes, society has attached some arbitrary monetary "value" on people's job & life choices.
That absolutely does not mean anyone "deserves to be poor."
Choices have consequences.

Taking a job at WOTC that does not pay enough so you will not be "poor" is a choice. If taking this job at WOTC will make someone "poor", as was alleged, and that person takes that job anyway, then yes they "deserve to be poor" .... they made a decision and a concious choice to be "poor".
 

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