WotC WotC Asks What Makes YOU Play Dungeons and Dragons?

Comments

Yaarel

Adventurer
ENWorld is the best newssource for knowing the latest about D&D 5e. Way better than WotC!

Its been this way for years now. I remember vividly looking to ENWorld for the latest hints about the still unveiled 4e. Same for the playtesting for 5e. Now I look to ENWorld for the lastest about what indy publishers are doing for 5e.

ENWorld is reliable. And the forumers are knowledgeable too.
 

Parmandur

Legend
It still has the problem of being heavily self-selected, as are internet surveys without some randomization.
Well, they aren't necessarily trying to get accurate data to extrapolate on all 100% of D&D players here. The self-selection might be part of the point.
 

Jay Verkuilen

Dogsbody Waghalter
Well, they aren't necessarily trying to get accurate data to extrapolate on all 100% of D&D players here. The self-selection might be part of the point.
I find it hard to know what value uncontrolled self-selection would have, although it's fairly challenging to identify exactly what the population of D&D players is, given how rapidly it's been changing. Still, color me professionally skeptical of the value of a survey that doesn't have a clear sampling plan and relies on self-selection.

And, frankly, I doubt this is the sole source of market research they are doing.
Most likely not.

I suspect they'll get the kinds of results they're looking for, though.
Fishing for results to confirm one's preconceived notions is generally not a great idea, if that's what they're doing. I suppose this kind of survey might be used to generate ideas for more refined research and it's clearly being used for publicity.
 

FaerieGodfather

Born in the Soul of Misery
Their survey process is getting self-selecting responses, but by and large people are self-selecting for being the most passionate consumers of D&D products-- the people whose preferences WotC most wants to accommodate.

People like me are outliers, a very small percentage of their overall response... and even then, we're telling them what sorts of niche products might have a consumer base outside of their core 5e playerbase.
 

Jay Verkuilen

Dogsbody Waghalter
I don't see any way it could be done without major selection effects.

Skewed information is probably better than no information at all though.
There's no way to survey without selection effects period, but strong skew due to selection bias has the potential to really mislead. On the other hand, blowing off selection does lead to a very inexpensive survey.
 

Parmandur

Legend
There's no way to survey without selection effects period, but strong skew due to selection bias has the potential to really mislead. On the other hand, blowing off selection does lead to a very inexpensive survey.
Well, these surveys apparently get six-seven figure response rates: they might not want a representative sample, but a through look at a large subset of the population.
 

Jay Verkuilen

Dogsbody Waghalter
Their survey process is getting self-selecting responses, but by and large people are self-selecting for being the most passionate consumers of D&D products-- the people whose preferences WotC most wants to accommodate.
I didn't really get that vibe from the survey. They seemed very much on the whole "are you bringing in new players?" That might be due to the branches I went down.

People like me are outliers, a very small percentage of their overall response... and even then, we're telling them what sorts of niche products might have a consumer base outside of their core 5e playerbase.
Except they seem to have little interest in generating those products, or haven't so far.
 

Jay Verkuilen

Dogsbody Waghalter
Well, these surveys apparently get six-seven figure response rates: they might not want a representative sample, but a through look at a large subset of the population.
Maybe but a seriously unrepresentative sample that is large often provides an illusion of certainty. There are tricks one can do to downweight observations when there's a clear excess of particular kinds but if the volunteering bias is large enough, those don't work either.

Of course, this is marketing research, not science, so maybe that doesn't matter, and the cost is quite low.
 

Parmandur

Legend
Maybe but a seriously unrepresentative sample that is large often provides an illusion of certainty. There are tricks one can do to downweight observations when there's a clear excess of particular kinds but if the volunteering bias is large enough, those don't work either.

Of course, this is marketing research, not science, so maybe that doesn't matter, and the cost is quite low.
Yeah, they aren't trying to predict election results, they want to know which historical D&D books and setting inspire passions among thousands of people.
 

Sword of Spirit

Adventurer
In the D&D motivations section, it had essentially the same page three times. I'm glad I noticed it so I could make sure not to get disqualified by answering "the same" question too differently. Those subtle differences often create a very different question with a possibly different answer for me.
 

ccs

39th lv DM
Hmm. I got to 99% before getting the age question.
Answered it & hit 100%, & got the thank you for participating line.
 

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