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D&D 5E You Can Now Get Minis For The D&D Combat Wheelchair

The combat wheelchair rules designed by Sara Thompson now have miniatures! And part of the proceeds go to charity.

combat_wheelchair_minis.jpg


The minis were designed by Russ Charles, who sculpted minis for Cats & Catacombs, Dungeons & Doggies, and others. There are four miniatures, each in a combat wheelchair -- human druid, tiffing cleric, dwarf barbarians and elf rogue. They're being produced by Strata Miniatures, and you can get physical metal or resin minis, or you can get 3D printer files.

A quarter of the proceeds go to the charity Ehlers-Danlos Support UK. So you can get something awesome and do something good at the same time!
 

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Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

Mistwell

Crusty Old Meatwad (he/him)
I am thinking a spellcaster would research a modification to tenser's floating disk to allow it to hover below you rather than behind you, and be more easily controlled, and be able to go up and down slightly, as a higher-level spell than the low level it currently is. Maybe 2nd level? Third? Regardless, the long duration and ritual tag would remain, and it would be something you can cast below your custom battle chair. That would allow you to float over difficult terrain, go up and down stairs, etc..
 

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These figures are awesome.

The explanation works fine, by a telepathically-controlled magical propulsion sigil. In a world with Floating Disk, using wheels is a style choice. (The circular disk on the figurine is a stand for use on a grid, and not part of the character concept. On the stand, is also the rugged ground that the wheels roll over.)

The figures are appealing.

While the figures alleviate ablism, at the same time, there is concern about sexism. Two "goodlooking" young women and two "ugly" old men, are the options here. The fear of goodlooking men tends to correlate with homophobia.
 

I am thinking a spellcaster would research a modification to tenser's floating disk to allow it to hover below you rather than behind you, and be more easily controlled, and be able to go up and down slightly, as a higher-level spell than the low level it currently is. Maybe 2nd level? Third? Regardless, the long duration and ritual tag would remain, and it would be something you can cast below your custom battle chair. That would allow you to float over difficult terrain, go up and down stairs, etc..
It reminds me of the car-like Floating Disc in some drow novels.
 

MGibster

Legend
While the figures alleviate ablism, at the same time, there is concern about sexism. Two "goodlooking" young women and two "ugly" old men, are the options here. The fear of goodlooking men tends to correlate with homophobia.

Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar. And that dwarf looks to me like a musclebound lump of beefcakey goodness in the prime of his life rather than an ugly old man.
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar. And that dwarf looks to me like a musclebound lump of beefcakey goodness in the prime of his life rather than an ugly old man.

Yeah. He's not ugly. He's just mad. Cuz he's a warrior. And people associate good looking men with homophobia? Really?
 





aco175

Legend
Druids shapeshift, Wizards cast fireballs, and monks can teleport through shadows and this is where you have trouble suspending your disbelief?

;)
Random thought- If a druid in a wheelchair shapeshifts, would he be able to use his legs if he was a frog or T-rex. I would assume so myself, but interested in others thoughts.
 



Random thought- If a druid in a wheelchair shapeshifts, would he be able to use his legs if he was a frog or T-rex. I would assume so myself, but interested in others thoughts.

By RAW, yes. You gain the speed type of the animal you wild shape to (since you can fly when you're high level enough to have a fly speed). So I guess you'd benefit from the regular walking speed of the form you transform to. BTW, I am pretty sure that if greater restoration can restore a missing limb, the curative spellcaster will have developped a lower level spell to make non-functionnal limbs working again. Depending on how maintream magic is in your world, people with disabilities might be extremely rare.
 


ccs

41st lv DM
That cleric is near perfect for a character/NPC that shows up in my campaigns. Just have to remove the horns & resculpt the ears to be human.

I like their up-coming Skaven bitz packs as well.
 



Bagpuss

Adventurer
Druids shapeshift, Wizards cast fireballs, and monks can teleport through shadows and this is where you have trouble suspending your disbelief?

It's understandable, because all those things are fantasy of which we have no actual real world experience to judge, but a wheelchair people have real world experience with, they know the wheels need turning by hands normally to make it move, that they have trouble with stairs, etc.

Hence you need to explain how it would work practically or through magical means to off set the real world knowledge that wheelchair just don't move by themselves.

Personally I love the miniatures, they are really dynamic, I particularly like the wheel of daggers for the rogue.
 

Dire Bare

Legend
In a magitech world with trains and sentient robots the magic wheelchair is a no-brainer. In a medieval world where the farmers still plow the fields with animals and potions are precious, it's out of place.

Overall, I'd say the magical wheelchair is roughly as universal as a ninja. Cool with lot's of RP potential. But there's a reason you don't see them in every campaign. Also, it's much easier to handwave the problems away if you slide more towards the gamist side of things, as opposed to the simulationist side.

In a standard, default D&D game . . . these magical chairs fit in just fine.

If you are running a campaign that shifts away from standard D&D, YMMV.
 


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