log in or register to remove this ad

 

D&D 5E You Can Now Get Minis For The D&D Combat Wheelchair

The combat wheelchair rules designed by Sara Thompson now have miniatures! And part of the proceeds go to charity.

combat_wheelchair_minis.jpg


The minis were designed by Russ Charles, who sculpted minis for Cats & Catacombs, Dungeons & Doggies, and others. There are four miniatures, each in a combat wheelchair -- human druid, tiffing cleric, dwarf barbarians and elf rogue. They're being produced by Strata Miniatures, and you can get physical metal or resin minis, or you can get 3D printer files.

A quarter of the proceeds go to the charity Ehlers-Danlos Support UK. So you can get something awesome and do something good at the same time!
 

log in or register to remove this ad

Russ Morrissey

Russ Morrissey

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Sometimes homophobia is just homophobia.




Fear of being attracted to goodlooking men, or fear of how others might react if one shows interest in goodlooking men.
Your mind reading attempt failed. The OBVIOUS issue is the blatant sexism that the minis for the female PCs have to be attractive.

Let’s leave the mentalism acts to the pros in the future.
 

log in or register to remove this ad


Sunsword

Adventurer
It's understandable, because all those things are fantasy of which we have no actual real world experience to judge, but a wheelchair people have real world experience with, they know the wheels need turning by hands normally to make it move, that they have trouble with stairs, etc.

Hence you need to explain how it would work practically or through magical means to off set the real world knowledge that wheelchair just don't move by themselves.

Personally I love the miniatures, they are really dynamic, I particularly like the wheel of daggers for the rogue.

Respectfully, no you don't. If you have someone who wants a wheelchair in your game let them move about just like any other PC it won't break the game.
 


Sunsword

Adventurer
In a magitech world with trains and sentient robots the magic wheelchair is a no-brainer. In a medieval world where the farmers still plow the fields with animals and potions are precious, it's out of place.

Overall, I'd say the magical wheelchair is roughly as universal as a ninja. Cool with lot's of RP potential. But there's a reason you don't see them in every campaign. Also, it's much easier to handwave the problems away if you slide more towards the gamist side of things, as opposed to the simulationist side.

I understand what you are saying, but if a player wants to be in a wheel chair why nitpick over it? Characters in D&D can take multiple attacks with lethal weapons, they can fly, they can make a Wish, they can resurrect the dead. I just don't think this is the biggest gotcha moment of this genre. Just my 2 cents.
 


Bagpuss

Adventurer
Respectfully, no you don't. If you have someone who wants a wheelchair in your game let them move about just like any other PC it won't break the game.

Oh totally, but if you just have it as a normal wheelchair it is gonna mess with your sense of disbelief the first time they encounter a stairs. You need some sort of explanation, as we all know wheels don't handle stairs well in the real world, even if you hand-wave it and say it's magic, it hovers up/down like a Dalek.

Of course there then becomes questions about "Well can it hover over difficult terrain, or over lava?"

Some DM's will be happy to hand-wave stuff and just say it is only a cosmetic difference and you get treated exactly like you could walk ('cos it is magic), and some players will be happy with that. Others (players and DMs) will want some sort of houserules than mean there is a difference (like the ones presented) so that it adds some mechanical flavour, otherwise you might as well just be walking.
 

Maggan

Writer of The Bitter Reach
Is there really a significant number of people confined to a wheelchair who want to pretend to be somebody else confined to a wheelchair?

Does it matter? The minis are there for those who want them, and there are people who want them, is my view of this. How many? I'm not losing sleep over that, like I'm not losing sleep over how many are in the market for a set of Blood Angels Terminator Assault Squad marines from Games Workshop.

It's an option someone thought worthwhile to produce. Like everything else.
 



Enrico Poli1

Adventurer
I actually DO have a friend in a wheelchair (I'm his best friend, I think)
I can assure you, he dreams of being normal. If he played D&D, his character would not be a disabled person.
Really, I don't see the point in these minis. They look good, however.
 

ART!

Hero
Is there really a significant number of people confined to a wheelchair who want to pretend to be somebody else confined to a wheelchair?

I think a significant number of people would be exactly equal to the number of people confined to a wheelchair who want to pretend to be somebody else confined to a wheelchair. ;)

I actually DO have a friend in a wheelchair (I'm his best friend, I think)
I can assure you, he dreams of being normal. If he played D&D, his character would not be a disabled person.
Really, I don't see the point in these minis. They look good, however.

The point is the same as for any specific mini or type of mini: some people want them and are even excited about them.
 


1988Sander31

Villager
Oh totally, but if you just have it as a normal wheelchair it is gonna mess with your sense of disbelief the first time they encounter a stairs. You need some sort of explanation, as we all know wheels don't handle stairs well in the real world, even if you hand-wave it and say it's magic, it hovers up/down like a Dalek.

Of course there then becomes questions about "Well can it hover over difficult terrain, or over lava?"

Some DM's will be happy to hand-wave stuff and just say it is only a cosmetic difference and you get treated exactly like you could walk ('cos it is magic), and some players will be happy with that. Others (players and DMs) will want some sort of houserules than mean there is a difference (like the ones presented) so that it adds some mechanical flavour, otherwise you might as well just be walking.
Players always want to make some cosmetic affect some minor narrative things to useful tool to write convert or to handle difficult situations that’s just how do you think they will use a property like levitation for the AdVantage that’s just how the world works so you have to be very careful how you deal with this issue.
Players always want to make some cosmetic affect some minor narrative things too useful tool to write combat or to handle difficult situations that’s just how do you think they will use a property like levitation for the AdVantage that’s just how the world works so you have to be very careful how you deal with this issue.
There is a wheelchair Emersion breaking? No, not in the FR and Eberron on or any setting like Golirian and so on wear something like this seems to be every day thing unless you’re really playing in medieval authentic game there is no point to bring out today ma realism to be bare

But if the item is too good in the game stands are versatile that might provide a problem I think no GM is a problem if the players ask him if he can play wheelchair bad character if they accept centaur limitations they have maybe can I don’t adventures as to just how things are if you play centre well climbing the clip is more difficult and if you’re playing
 

Is there really a significant number of people confined to a wheelchair who want to pretend to be somebody else confined to a wheelchair?
Are there really a significant number of handicapped people who want to continue to be erased from being depicted in the world?

If this product isn't for you, don't buy it. You are also not obligated to show your lack of empathy by telling us so.
 


MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
Even if the wheelchair is a bit "over powered"...can't say I care. I think it is kinda cool that something some may see as a crutch (NOW I want to design magic crutches!) becoming a source of power and extra ability.

The only thing I would change is that I would make this a unique item, not something you can just buy. Work it into the back story. If something were to happen to it, say it were stolen or destroyed, there would need to be a quest to get it back or perhaps find the gnome artificer who created it to try to have him make another one (or find the plans for making it).

I'm less concerned about "balance" than I am making such a cool magic item feel special, not just something you buy at the market. Maybe that could be a plot thread. Trying to find ways to make more devices like this to provide to others.

Clerics do not get regenerate until 13th level. And in my campaigns, I don't assume that any spell available to players are easily found among similarly-leveled NPCs. I'd rather have true regeneration be exceedingly rare. Until a character of the right class is of the right level, it would be easier to find a wish and have to think about if you really want to burn it on a regeneration.

Instead make magic prosthetic limbs (see Eberron or Wildemont setting books), magic wheel chairs, ersatz eyes, etc. Why have all these cool magic items that are meant to address permanent dismemberment and disfigurement if you can just go to a temple and pay a high-powered cleric to regenerate it.
 

Bercilak

Explorer
It seems like these minis are cool, even if they are never used to represent a character in an RPG. I often buy minis because I like the sculpt or they represent something I haven't seen in mini form before. I'm thinking these would make a cool warband for Song of Blades and Heroes, Rangers of Shadow Deep, or Frostgrave.
 

Related Articles

Visit Our Sponsor

Latest threads

An Advertisement

Advertisement4

Top