🏳️‍🌈Pride Month- Celebrating Representation in TTRPGs🏳️‍🌈

MGibster

Legend
Because of the nature of coding in the 70s and especially the 80s, it's often difficult to separate things that are obvious now (see, e.g., practically anything put out by George Michael) as opposed to those things that seem insanely obvious now but ... weren't intended (see, e.g., Top Gun).
Wait? What about George Michael? Dude was up to his eyebrows in babes. And when is Elton John going to find a nice girl and settle down? Aw, hell, he's probably worried no one woman could accept his Rock 'n Roll lifestyle.
 

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Sacrosanct

Legend
Rufus and Burne are recipients of pretty much the same subtext projection as Bert and Ernie. They're two guys who live together and don't actively engage in obviously heterosexual behavior (though Burne does hang out at the bar - so maybe he's open to hook-ups of an undefined nature).
I think it's mainly a bit of harmless fun, though it does get a bit tiring about Bert and Ernie because it's so commonly used and kind of obscures the more overt example that the Muppet duo serves - how two people who are SO different can still be best of friends.
Or Cary Grant and Randolph Scott. At the time, they were "just roomates". Even when Grant got married to shake rumors he was gay, he got divorced shortly after because he wouldn't make Randolph move out. In hindsight, it's pretty obvious. Although, I wish we could also normalize straight male relationships like this. That would help solve a lot of problems of toxic masculinity as well...

1686327719903.png
 

MGibster

Legend
Or Cary Grant and Randolph Scott. At the time, they were "just roomates".
And supposedly when Betsy Drake was asked if Cary Grant was gay she replied, "Why would I believe Cary was homosexual when we were busy %@#!ing?" Maybe he was bisexual. He lived 43 years before he met me. I don't know what he did."

How about J. Edgar Hoover and Clyde Tolson?

Edgar.JPG
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Supporter
Because of the nature of coding in the 70s and especially the 80s, it's often difficult to separate things that are obvious now (see, e.g., practically anything put out by George Michael) as opposed to those things that seem insanely obvious now but ... weren't intended (see, e.g., Top Gun).
Or the theory that Billy Joel’s Piano Man is a song about a piano player in a gay bar who doesn’t know it’s a gay bar.

See also the early Batman serials in which he and Robin change in the back seat of the car.
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
And supposedly when Betsy Drake was asked if Cary Grant was gay she replied, "Why would I believe Cary was homosexual when we were busy %@#!ing?" Maybe he was bisexual. He lived 43 years before he met me. I don't know what he did."
Well, just because someone has sex with someone of another gender doesn't make them attracted to that gender. Happens pretty frequently, actually. Especially in situations where one is trying to "keep appearances".
 


aramis erak

Legend
Rufus and Burne are recipients of pretty much the same subtext projection as Bert and Ernie. They're two guys who live together and don't actively engage in obviously heterosexual behavior (though Burne does hang out at the bar - so maybe he's open to hook-ups of an undefined nature).
I think it's mainly a bit of harmless fun, though it does get a bit tiring about Bert and Ernie because it's so commonly used and kind of obscures the more overt example that the Muppet duo serves - how two people who are SO different can still be best of friends.
Bert and Ernie were outed as gay by one of the writers responsible for much of their story....

In re SJG, they happen to have a PBG setting, the Vorkosigan Saga Sourcebook and Roleplaying Game, which happens to be about a setting with an entire planet populated entirely by gay men (Athos), and a Vor Lord, Dono, who goes to Beta Colony, and becomes Lady Donna, causing a whole secondary crisis in one of the novels the sourcebook is based upon. Barrayar is noted as sexually and morally old school, ableist, and generally regressive; it's constantly compared to Beta Colony, which is sexually flexible, engineered a stable functional hermaphrodite third gender, and have a whole complex code of earrings to tell you the gender of the wearer, their gender(s) of interest, their availability, and their (general) level of sexual adventurousness...

The surprising thing about SJG is that they have been openly LGBTQ friendly for a long time, despite being in one of the, uhm, less enlightened states...
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
I thought I would put this here since it's not quite worth a whole thread on its own.

I just finished watching the Flash's last season (now available on Netflix). It was a surprisingly satisfying ending, given how uneven (being nice) the series has been for a while, mainly because it had a lot ... and I mean A LOT of fan service for people that watched the greater Arrowverse. It was pretty much 100% fan service, to be honest.

But the reason I am putting a comment here is that for whatever faults the Arrowverse, which started in 2012, had as a superhero show, it did an amazing job in terms of representation. No, it wasn't always perfect. But in terms of mainstream shows, it consistently featured queer characters and queer relationships ... and did so as part of the regular setting.
 

MGibster

Legend
But the reason I am putting a comment here is that for whatever faults the Arrowverse, which started in 2012, had as a superhero show, it did an amazing job in terms of representation. No, it wasn't always perfect. But in terms of mainstream shows, it consistently featured queer characters and queer relationships ... and did so as part of the regular setting.
I stopped watching The Flash a while back mainly because the Iris/Barry romance creeped me the %#%# out, but I did like how they handled some of the representation. The first time I noticed was when they just casually mention the captain's (chief's?) husband during a conversation. It wasn't a big deal, it wasn't a defining aspect of his character, it was just casually mentioned without any attention being drawn towards it.
 

Snarf Zagyg

Notorious Liquefactionist
I stopped watching The Flash a while back mainly because the Iris/Barry romance creeped me the %#%# out, but I did like how they handled some of the representation. The first time I noticed was when they just casually mention the captain's (chief's?) husband during a conversation. It wasn't a big deal, it wasn't a defining aspect of his character, it was just casually mentioned without any attention being drawn towards it.

One of the things I loved about the Arrowverse is that, outside of the titular characters on each show*, heterosexuality was not a presumption. It was entirely possible to find out that characters (other heroes, villains, and random people) had same-sex relationships or partners, and it was just an accepted part of the show that was unremarked. The only slight exception was when Supergirl debuted a trans superhero (Dreamer) which they did focus on the issue involved a little more, but still avoided the "Very Special Episode" feeling. IMO.


*And even with this, Legends of Tomorrow had a bisexual lead.
 

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