Add A Colossal $250 Sailing Ship To Your D&D Minis Collection!

The Falling Star Sailing Ship is a 33" colossal model of a sailing ship produced by WizKids, as part of their Icons of the Realms series.

The Falling Star Sailing Ship is a 33" colossal model of a sailing ship produced by WizKids, as part of their Icons of the Realms series.

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In full, it's 17.2" tall, 33" long, and 6.4" wide, with reversible deck tiles (with/without gridlines), magnetic removable masts and staircases, and more. It will retail for $249.99. "Adventure awaits on the high seas with the D&D Icons of the Realms: The Falling Star Sailing Ship! This fantastic fully-painted miniature of colossal stature and tremendous detail stands a whopping 17.2" tall, 33" long, and 6.4" wide (12.6" wide at the masts!)* and has a myriad of features! Additionally, the deck tiles are reversible, with or without grid lines, to allow for whichever way you play or wish to display this premium show piece. This feature rich ships includes multiple stackable deck tiles allowing players to fight on the deck or in the dark underbelly of the ship, magnetized removable masts, removable stair cases, and even functional hatches on the sides of the ships for you to fire upon your enemies! Perfect for aquatic adventures, one shot side quests, or even taking on the godlike kraken, the D&D Icons of the Realms: The Falling Star Sailing Ship is sure to bring marvelous excitement to your tabletop!" Thanks to Gustavo for the scoop!


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Inchoroi

Adventurer
dying of laughter


If they think I'm paying $250 for that ship, they might be right. Crap.

Why did my players have to vote for a pirate campaign next...
 


Inchoroi

Adventurer
So I'm guessing it in the gray Vallejo primer color from the pics we've seen before and have to paint?

If I recall the press before, it'll be pre-painted. Probably why its so expensive (since I have miniature modelers in my group, I'd rather have an unpainted one).
 

dying of laughter


If they think I'm paying $250 for that ship, they might be right. Crap.

Why did my players have to vote for a pirate campaign next...

I opted for cardstock floor plans for my needs, be it ships, buildings, dungeons, etc. If you do your own they will always be right. I've picked up some Dwarven Forge and the like over time, and I had a lot of wargame terrain from miniature games before (and after) D&D, but the advantages to cardstock are portability and ease of storage. If you don't mind the time and have some artistic ability they can look fairly decent. If flat :)
 

MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
Hmmm....looking at the picture closely, I don't see any slot/hole in the deck for the masts. Are they free standing? If so, seems like it would be far to easy to knock them over while trying to move minis around.
 

Inchoroi

Adventurer
I opted for cardstock floor plans for my needs, be it ships, buildings, dungeons, etc. If you do your own they will always be right. I've picked up some Dwarven Forge and the like over time, and I had a lot of wargame terrain from miniature games before (and after) D&D, but the advantages to cardstock are portability and ease of storage. If you don't mind the time and have some artistic ability they can look fairly decent. If flat :)

I have very little drawing capability. Only thing I got going for me is that I can type 85 words a minute and I read too much!

On the other hand, I did at one point have WorldWork's papercraft Maiden of the Sea, which was nice...until it fell apart, since I live in the south on the coast and humidity is a thing.
 

EthanSental

Legend
Supporter
Hmmm....looking at the picture closely, I don't see any slot/hole in the deck for the masts. Are they free standing? If so, seems like it would be far to easy to knock them over while trying to move minis around.

You probably already caught the info in red but the masts have magnets to hold them in place.
 

I have very little drawing capability. Only thing I got going for me is that I can type 85 words a minute and I read too much!

On the other hand, I did at one point have WorldWork's papercraft Maiden of the Sea, which was nice...until it fell apart, since I live in the south on the coast and humidity is a thing.

You don't need too much in the way of drawing skill. Just cardstock (I use poster board), rulers, and pencils / markers. It won't be a work of art, but it will be useful. I share the reading thing with you, but I am in total envy of your typing speed!

Humidity can be a problem, I don't have that issue living on the edge of a desert. On the other hand we haven't seen high temperatures below 100 in a few weeks... Anyway lamination might help. I do it to some of the more used plans to protect them. Not positive on how humidity would impact that.

If you don't mind the time you can do some pretty large structures. I have a Lawful cathedral that took multiple 35" x 22" poster boards per level. 5 feet per inch. I have all of my plans on graph paper (at 50 feet per inch). I do the plans in card stock that are frequently used, likely to see combat, or (in some cases) just strike my fancy :) The cathedral involved a wedding, a challenge, and a duel between the Champion (aka best man) and a bounty hunter who was after the (NPC) bride. There was a kidnapping attempt in it as well one time.

If you plan properly a limited number of plans can fit numerous buildings too. There are, for example, only so many layouts for homes, shops, warehouses, etc. of a given size. A lot of buildings would be produced to traditional and familiar plans. A dozen or so plans and a few "specials" later and I have the floor plans for most homes of a given size in my major city. I have 5 general sizes for homes (which may include businesses), pretty much all done. With the city on graph paper and the key telling what floor plans I need and the furniture / "dressing" for each. The use of rooms for different purposes and furniture gives you a lot of variation for the time used. The result is, I can lay out most of a mid sized city (population about 17,000). With the bulk of structures covered I can do the big / important specials as needed.

The same is true of boats, ships, barges etc., not to speak of sections of dungeon / cavern / forest etc.

*edit* for the usual spelling issues and added thoughts / verbal babblings :)
 
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MNblockhead

A Title Much Cooler Than Anything on the Old Site
You probably already caught the info in red but the masts have magnets to hold them in place.[/QUOTE


Given the shape and top-heavy nature of the masts, I would worry about their stability if only held by magnets. If the magnets are strong enough, however, it will be a nice feature. Easy to move them out of the way if not needed.
 

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