D&D General Are NPCs like PCs?


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Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
This has already been proven false in this thread by direct quotes from the 1e DMG, so it would be nice if we could stop bringing it up.
I proved it to be factually true. Page 103 of the 1e DMG under Non-Player Characters (Roles of the DM) lists the subcategories. They are.

1. Henchmen
2. Hirelings
3. MONSTERS
4. Other Non-Player Characters.

Subcategory 4 lists the kinds of NPCs it covers. It includes, merchants, shopkeepers, guardsmen, soldiers, clerics, magic-users. thieves, assassins, etc.
 


Sacrosanct

Legend
It might not be the official definition, but I consider an NPC to be any GM controlled unique creature. Mooks and fodder and most non-intelligent creatures typically don't fall into that category. Non-player character. To me, that infers personality. Those dozen goblins attacking? Nope. Brugor, the goblin leader? Yep.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
They're still NPCs though. This is like saying pugs aren't dogs because someone listed out all the kinds of dogs.
This response made such little sense as a response to me that I actually logged out to see if you had quoted someone who blocked me in order to get context for your statement.

How does your response make sense as a response to my argument that henchmen, hirelings, monsters and other NPCs are all distinct subcategories of NPC?
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
It might not be the official definition, but I consider an NPC to be any GM controlled unique creature. Mooks and fodder and most non-intelligent creatures typically don't fall into that category. Non-player character. To me, that infers personality. Those dozen goblins attacking? Nope. Brugor, the goblin leader? Yep.
I can see and understand that distinction, though I don't use it myself. To me you are still playing those dozen goblins, directing their actions and such. That makes them NPCs to me.
 

Reynard

Legend
Supporter
I proved it to be factually true. Page 103 of the 1e DMG under Non-Player Characters (Roles of the DM) lists the subcategories. They are.

1. Henchmen
2. Hirelings
3. MONSTERS
4. Other Non-Player Characters.

Subcategory 4 lists the kinds of NPCs it covers. It includes, merchants, shopkeepers, guardsmen, soldiers, clerics, magic-users. thieves, assassins, etc.
It's a distinction without a difference that is a distraction that has been rolling along way too long in this thread. It is completely and utterly irrelevant.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
It's a distinction without a difference that is a distraction that has been rolling along way too long in this thread. It is completely and utterly irrelevant.
It is not a distinction without a difference. Monsters are treated differently than "Other NPCs" and you conflated brigands(Other NPC subcategory) with monsters(Monster subcategory) and that is why we are here. Brigands in past editions(1e-3e) were not treated as monsters, even if they were in the monster manual. They were treated as level 0 humans and then PC classed fighters, magic-users and clerics. They all(including the level 0 ones) had the same abilities as any other fighter, magic-user or thief. There was nothing they did that PCs could not also learn to do.
 


Azzy

ᚳᚣᚾᛖᚹᚢᛚᚠ
It is not a distinction without a difference. Monsters are treated differently than "Other NPCs" and you conflated brigands(Other NPC subcategory) with monsters(Monster subcategory) and that is why we are here. Brigands in past editions(1e-3e) were not treated as monsters, even if they were in the monster manual. They were treated as level 0 humans and then PC classed fighters, magic-users and clerics. They all(including the level 0 ones) had the same abilities as any other fighter, magic-user or thief. There was nothing they did that PCs could not also learn to do.
Beserkers say "Hi!"
 

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