Bad Movies You Liked

I listed Red Sonja. I was a fan of Ernie Reyes Jr. Oh! Speaking of, another movie that I absolutely love, and watch probably once a year or so that doesn't get any love: The Last Dragon. Bruce Leroy! Shonuff!
You can't mention Ernie without mentioning another movie of his that I like: Surf Ninjas. :)
 

doctorbadwolf

Heretic of The Seventh Circle
Krull. Classic! Watched it until the corner store had to get a new tape for me to rent every weekend.

Dungeons and Dragons. Seriously. It’s wonderful. Full stop.

He-Man.

Hitman.

XXX Vin Deisel, dumb action, stunts, Rammstein. 👍👍👍

Solarbabies. Just go download it somewhere and watch it, man. It’s the best.
 
A couple more that underperformed that I also enjoyed:

The Last Witchhunter
Seventh Son

And The Great Wall with Matt Damon. It got all sorts of bad press and poor box office because of the false accusations of Whitewashing, but it is actually good and the "White Guy saves the Asians" trope is minor to the overall story.
 
As a related aside, I have come to feel that Rotten Tomatoes is a bane on culture. On one hand, their ratings do provide something: they give a kind of status quo take on how good a film is and probably correlate pretty well with the Academy and your garden variety middle class Americans. But I dislike the whole idea of "cultural gatekeepers" who decide what is and is not quality, which often has a political aspect to it.

At the very least, I have found that there isn't a strong correlation between RT ratings and my enjoyment of a film. Or rather, the correlation is something like half the time, maybe a bit more, maybe a bit less. But sometimes they are just way off. For instance, one of my top 5 favorite films is rated at 22%, and this is a film that I find deeply meaningful.

A more well-known example of "RT dissonance" is their rating for Dark Phoenix. While it was far from a perfect film, it was hardly the disaster that their 23% rating implies. Certainly it was far better than X-Men: The Last Stand (57%). What I think happens is that word-of-mouth gets out, and people--even professional reviewers--are influenced by what they hear. All of a sudden is cool to bag on Dark Phoenix.

Basically I think it comes down to this: RT ratings represent the cultural status quo. If your tastes align closely with the status quo, then they'll work for you. If you diverge from the status quo, well, the more you diverge, the less the ratings will align with your tastes.
 

Ath-kethin

Explorer
The Schwartzenegger Conan films are both glorious IMO and Destroyer is my 5yo's inspiration for everything - from D&D characters to LEGO stories to this year's Halloween costume.

DragonSlayer is a master class in how NOT to write a film climax.

The David Lynch Dune is a bit ponderous but the visuals are astounding and Kyle MacLachlan remains the only actor to have played Paul Atreides properly IMO. And the film's depiction of Alia is just perfect. I named my cat after her.

Off-genre: I absolutely adored the film SpiceWorld and it's a much smarter film than most give it credit for.
 
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Blackrat

He Who Lurks Beyond The Veil
I seem to be stuck on echoing already mentioned movies.

Labyrinth definitely. I loved this, but I’m so damned young that I didn’t know it flopped 😂 It was my childhood favourite.

I also liked John Carter. It did rather good attempting to adapt the franchise to ”easy digest” level for average viewer.

Red Sonja and Masters of the Universe were both on the list of movies I watched dozens of times as a kid/teenager.

One that I can’t agree with earlier posts though. I do not like the Lynch’s Dune. It is a poor attempt at an impossible to adapt book. I liked the miniseries enough to enjoy it, but it too failed on my book...
 

BookBarbarian

Expert Long Rester
It's events hew closer to the book but the kid playing Paul was so horribly miscast it really drowned out the rest of the film for me. I really think Lynch hit the spirit of the book better overall.
What? The whole end monologue is about how Maud’dib will bring peace...except in the book it's a known universal spanning jihad that cost 6 billion lives.
 

Ryujin

Adventurer
It's events hew closer to the book but the kid playing Paul was so horribly miscast it really drowned out the rest of the film for me. I really think Lynch hit the spirit of the book better overall.
I felt that Lynch missed the basic gut feel of the book horribly. The shortcut of making Baron Harkonnen physically objectionable to make the audience immediately dislike him was crass. "Weirding modules"? Seriously? The mini series hit the mark far better but this is still a property that's begging for a remake, and that's something I almost never say.
 

BookBarbarian

Expert Long Rester
I felt that Lynch missed the basic gut feel of the book horribly. The shortcut of making Baron Harkonnen physically objectionable to make the audience immediately dislike him was crass. "Weirding modules"? Seriously? The mini series hit the mark far better but this is still a property that's begging for a remake, and that's something I almost never say.
I think the Lynch film had a better budget and cast. The mini series stayed closer to the books, but I have little else good to say about it.

At least the sequel had James McAvoy in it.

Edit: I also like the Soundtrack of the film even if it is sheer 80s ridiculousness. Probably because of that actually.
 

Ralif Redhammer

Adventurer
For being band that had never done a soundtrack before (or since), Toto's Dune soundtrack is pretty awesome.

As for the movie, I like it. It does rely overly much on narration in a few instances. I haven't seen the Extended/Smithee cut in ages, though.

A recent bad movie I enjoyed was the Taron Egerton Robin Hood. Between its completely anachronistic design and over-the-top feats, it sure felt like a D&D game turned into a movie (minus magic and monsters).

Edit: I also like the Soundtrack of the film even if it is sheer 80s ridiculousness. Probably because of that actually.
 

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