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D&D 5E Content Warning Labels? Yeah or Nay?


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Faolyn

Hero
And it's crawling with fey.....er, fay.....uh, faigh.....feigh.....hell, whatever they are there's a lot of 'em and they're about to swarm us! :)
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BookTenTiger

He / Him
This is a little off topic, but I thought you'd enjoy it.

In a parenting book I read recently, the author proposes the theory that some mythology was created to help kids remember how to stay safe in the world. For example, the legendary kelpie is a horse that lives in the water and likes to drag those who stray too close into the depths to drown. A kid is going to remember that way better than the rule "don't go near the water without your parents."

This author then started creating myths around her house. For example, her kid always left the fridge door open after getting out juice, so they created the "refrigerator monster" who normally is too cold to move, but warms up when the door is left open... Her kid loved it, added to the myth herself, and now remembers to close the fridge door!
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
This is a little off topic, but I thought you'd enjoy it.

In a parenting book I read recently, the author proposes the theory that some mythology was created to help kids remember how to stay safe in the world. For example, the legendary kelpie is a horse that lives in the water and likes to drag those who stray too close into the depths to drown. A kid is going to remember that way better than the rule "don't go near the water without your parents."

This author then started creating myths around her house. For example, her kid always left the fridge door open after getting out juice, so they created the "refrigerator monster" who normally is too cold to move, but warms up when the door is left open... Her kid loved it, added to the myth herself, and now remembers to close the fridge door!
This aligns pretty well with how most folklore was low culture. I.e., created and shared among the peasantry, where children would face more danger than a child of a noble or wealthy family.
 

Galandris

Foggy Bottom Campaign Setting Fan
This aligns pretty well with how most folklore was low culture. I.e., created and shared among the peasantry, where children would face more danger than a child of a noble or wealthy family.
Is this clail supported by data? It's really interesting but I've never seen studies that differentiated children survival rate accorsing to class (prospect was bleak in both cases). I guess that a nurse would be supervising the richer child and he would be less exposed to extenuous labor, but I figured it would show at a statistical level only after the industrial revolution.
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
Is this clail supported by data? It's really interesting but I've bever seen studies that differentiated children survival rate accorsing to class. I girss that a nirse would be supervising the richer child and he would be less exposed to extenuous labor, but I figured it would show at a statistical level only after the industrial revolution.
Nothing's much changed from 1000 years ago to now, in the context of how wealthier families generally have better access to healthcare, food, education, and security. Add in the lack of any child labor laws back then, and the gap becomes even greater.
 

S'mon

Legend
This is a little off topic, but I thought you'd enjoy it.

In a parenting book I read recently, the author proposes the theory that some mythology was created to help kids remember how to stay safe in the world. For example, the legendary kelpie is a horse that lives in the water and likes to drag those who stray too close into the depths to drown. A kid is going to remember that way better than the rule "don't go near the water without your parents."

This author then started creating myths around her house. For example, her kid always left the fridge door open after getting out juice, so they created the "refrigerator monster" who normally is too cold to move, but warms up when the door is left open... Her kid loved it, added to the myth herself, and now remembers to close the fridge door!

I tried that approach - my son said it gave him nightmares for years... #parentingfail
 

S'mon

Legend
Is this clail supported by data? It's really interesting but I've never seen studies that differentiated children survival rate accorsing to class (prospect was bleak in both cases). I guess that a nurse would be supervising the richer child and he would be less exposed to extenuous labor, but I figured it would show at a statistical level only after the industrial revolution.

Greg Clark has a lot of data A Farewell to Alms - basically lots of downward mobility until the Industrial Revolution.
 


iserith

Magic Wordsmith
This is a little off topic, but I thought you'd enjoy it.

In a parenting book I read recently, the author proposes the theory that some mythology was created to help kids remember how to stay safe in the world. For example, the legendary kelpie is a horse that lives in the water and likes to drag those who stray too close into the depths to drown. A kid is going to remember that way better than the rule "don't go near the water without your parents."

This author then started creating myths around her house. For example, her kid always left the fridge door open after getting out juice, so they created the "refrigerator monster" who normally is too cold to move, but warms up when the door is left open... Her kid loved it, added to the myth herself, and now remembers to close the fridge door!
That is my understanding of the purpose of fairy tales, by and large, in addition to passing along important psychological truths. It's more than just some problematic story from the past. It serves an important purpose. Take a good look at Hansel & Gretel, for example, with all its archetypal symbols and underlying messages. There's a lot in there for children to learn that applies in the modern world.
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
That is my understanding of the purpose of fairy tales, by and large, in addition to passing along important psychological truths. It's more than just some problematic story from the past. It serves an important purpose. Take a good look at Hansel & Gretel, for example, with all its archetypal symbols and underlying messages. There's a lot in there for children to learn that applies in the modern world.
"Stepmothers are always evil, and if we can't feed you, we'll abandon you out in the forest alone to fend for yourself." 🤷‍♂️
 

BookTenTiger

He / Him
That is my understanding of the purpose of fairy tales, by and large, in addition to passing along important psychological truths. It's more than just some problematic story from the past. It serves an important purpose. Take a good look at Hansel & Gretel, for example, with all its archetypal symbols and underlying messages. There's a lot in there for children to learn that applies in the modern world.
What's interesting is how the fairy tales have then been reinterpreted and used by others.

For example, the Brothers Grimm (two linguistics professors) wanted to show that the various principalities of Germany were united under one culture, through their language and shared mythology. They also wanted to reinforce traditional gender roles and family structure, so they chose or edited myths that portrayed the kinds of roles they liked.

Disney of course took the myths and repurposed them to sell movie tickets and toys!
 

Sacrosanct

Legend
Publisher
For example, the Brothers Grimm (two linguistics professors) wanted to show that the various principalities of Germany were united under one culture, through their language and shared mythology. They also wanted to reinforce traditional gender roles and family structure, so they chose or edited myths that portrayed the kinds of roles they liked.
With a heavy dose of anti-Semitism as well.
 


iserith

Magic Wordsmith
"Stepmothers are always evil, and if we can't feed you, we'll abandon you out in the forest alone to fend for yourself." 🤷‍♂️
There's more to the story than just that, but this piece of it also speaks to the evolutionary incentive a stepmother may have to favor her children over another person's children, which may have been a much bigger problem at one time.
 

BookTenTiger

He / Him
There's more to the story than just that, but this piece of it also speaks to the evolutionary incentive a stepmother may have to favor her children over another person's children, which may have been a much bigger problem at one time.
I've read that originally a lot of other evil stepmothers were just evil mothers, and the Brothers Grimm changed them to better fit their audience.
 

iserith

Magic Wordsmith
I've read that originally a lot of other evil stepmothers were just evil mothers, and the Brothers Grimm changed them to better fit their audience.
It really just hits on the negative/dark feminine archetype, regardless of the actual legal distinction. The witch in the story (and a lot of wicked mothers or stepmothers) represents the devouring mother, for example.
 

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