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Cookin again

Ulfgeir

Adventurer
I guess I should have had yellow bell pepper for more variety in colour, and thinking about putting some cashews or peanuts in it next time to make it fancier. But it was quite good.
 

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Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Of all the bell peppers, I prefer the yellow most. They seem...sweeter.

Nuts would be good in that, I’d think. Perhaps even a quick oven roast before adding them?
 


Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
I have to say, I was worried about the ribs. It’s been a long time since I did some in the oven, so I was foggy on how long to cook them...and at what temp. After seeking guidance on the internet, I decided on 135 min at 300degF.

And I seasoned the living bejesus out of them.

So when I opened my oven at the bing if my timer, I was a bit worried. There was significant shrinkage, and they were darker than any previous batch I had done. I was worried I’d overcooked them.

But having had them 2 consecutive meals, now, I can say they’re not overcooked- the seasoning just crusted up nicely.

That said, the next oven batch will only be roasted for 120 min...
 


TheSword

Legend
Supporter
My favourite odd combination.
Peanut butter and cucumber slices...

...sweet and salty but cool, crunchy but juicy, cloying but clean and fresh. Great combo.
 




Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
My local favorite Burmese place- Inlay in Lewisville, TX- has been struggling because of the pandemic. So I went there for lunch.

They said they had been close to closing, but they have had a bunch of new customers, and reviews have consistently been 4.5 stars out of 5 or better. I tried something new today.

Clearly, it was up to their usual standards!

 


Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
@Dannyalcatraz Clearly emphasis on the past tense.

Also, I don't know that I've had Burmese. Something like Thai or Indian maybe?
It’s a little like both while still being its own thing. If you like either, odds are good you’ll find something to like in a Burmese place. There are curries, uses of coconut milk in soups & sauces, different kinds of tofu...

Most of the food I’ve had there has been mild to moderately spicy, but I’ve had one or two that were definitely firebringers.
 

prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
Supporter
It’s a little like both while still being its own thing. If you like either, odds are good you’ll find something to like in a Burmese place. There are curries, uses of coconut milk in soups & sauces, different kinds of tofu...

Most of the food I’ve had there has been mild to moderately spicy, but I’ve had one or two that were definitely firebringers.
We have good Thai and good Indian very near us. My wife says there used to be a Burmese (Myanmar-ish?) place in the next suburb she used to go to. That suburb has lots of recent-immigrant food (or did as recently as a couple years ago), but going out to restaurants to eat there is ... probably not high on our priority list at the moment.

It certainly sounds as though I'd be likely to find food to like.
 


Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
After 20 or so years, we’re buying new dinnerware,

Mom actually had an untouched box of our current set (Mikasa Studio Nova Sapphire) in the attic. She planned on swapping out the worst 4 place settings worth for the new. But when I unboxed and washed it, the difference in condition was glaring. Forget the accumulated minor scrapes.- the older stuff’s texture was rougher and the colors had faded significantly.

When I looked online for other place settings or just more single pieces, we decided we were better off selling the best of what we have and getting new. So we’re going with Noritake Colortrio Stax.



Over time, we’ll be picking up pieces from the whole set.

 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Mom’s dinner tonight:

Chicken salad, tomatoes, avocado, pickled cauliflower, garlic-stuffed olives, sliced parrano cheese


My dinner tonight:

Toasted roasted garlic bread topped with garlic-herbed D’affinois, radish sprouts, Campari tomatoes, prosciutto and ground black pepper; served with a sliced honeycrisp apple
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Beer-braised corned beef:

Before

After



RECIPE
1) Soak raw corned beef in water 24-36 hours to reduce saltiness.

2) Place meat in Dutch oven with enough beer to almost cover it completely. This one was 4lbs, and required 2 beers (Shiner Bock) in a 7.25qt pot to do the job.

3) season with the supplied seasoning packet liberally supplemented with cracked black pepper, thyme, and 4 bay leaves (in the beer)

4) Cook in oven at 350degF for 50min/lb.
 

prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
Supporter
@Dannyalcatraz That sounds like a decent approach to corned beef. Thoughts, in no particular order: Shiner Bock seems like a decent choice--you certainly wouldn't want somehting intensely hops-focused. That post size seems familiar--Le Creuset, by any chance? Did you bake it covered or not?
 

the Jester

Legend
bluerice1.jpg
bluerice2.jpg
bluerice in curry.jpg



Sorry for the potato quality pics- my phone's camera is pretty messed up. Made blue rice last night, using no food coloring. It was beautiful. The color comes from (I am not making this up) clitoris flowers, which add basically no noticeable flavor to the dish. The rice kept its color even after soaking in curry broth. My mom couldn't stop gushing about how amazing it looked throughout dinner. You can get the flowers on Amazon, and they're pretty cheap. I stuffed a tea ball with them and steeped it in 2 cups of hot water, then used that to cook the rice. It's an easy way to really turn up a meal's appearance with minimal effort and expense.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Yep, that’s Le Creuset. Good eye!

The cooking was done covered.

I’ve done the corned beef with a few different, relatively mainstream beers, and they all seem to work. The first time I did it, I used Kirin. It was good, but salty...but that first time, I didn’t soak the meat first.

The results for this method are consistently moist & tender. I can’t recommend it enough. I have lived most of my life hating corned beef, only making it for my Mom, who loves the stuff. I steamed it, I baked it, etc. When I hit upon this idea and served it to her, she stopped after one bite and demanded I try it. I asked her what the problem was. She said that it was some of the best she’d ever had.
 

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