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Cookin again

Zardnaar

Legend
If it’s good, I don’t care too much if it’s boring. If I’m eating it for the 8th meal in a row, THEN boring becomes an issue.

Several years ago, Mom made a HUGE batch of small banana pecan pancakes. They were very tasty, but after having them several meals in a row, I had to stop. I don’t know if I’ve had tgat kind of pancake since.

And I grew up eating PB & grape jelly sandwiches pretty often. Loved them. So when I went awa for my 1st year of college, my folks got me a 5lb can of Peter Pan and a 3lb jar of Welch’s Concorde Grape jelly. Because of renovations, only one of the school’s fining facilities was open for dinner service, and I kept getting there too late. So I ate a LOT of PB&J sandwiches.

I have not had grape jelly of any kind since 1987.

I'm like that with rum. Copped a bottle back in 96, must have been poisoned or something.

Haven't touched it since.

Don't make pancakes that often, left over suger,powdered milk, flour from lockdown.

Basic 1 of everything recipe, 1 egg, cup of flour/milk, tablespoon of butter, tsp baking soda, 1 desert spoon suger etc
 

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Cadence

Legend
Supporter
Recipe from my great Aunt (now 100) whose parents immigrated to the states from Finland. It was one of the recipes we submitted to an 8th grade ethnic cookbook back in the early 1980s. Our family copy had vanished, but a friend found one a few weeks ago (go go Facebook). I apparently don't have the patience to dice (instead of cube) and it makes me wonder if a bag of frozen cubed potatoes could be comandeered for the job. The white pepper is a nice flavor change, and it's different to have a dish like this without cheese.

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Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Mom’s getting some culinary wishes fulfilled at the moment. Comfort foods.

Tonight, for instance, I did pork chops baked over onion with a side of stuffing. Plain, midwestern style stuffing, not our creole oyster version.

In a couple of days, I’ll be making hot dog casserole for the first time in my life. Essentially, you take the ingredients of a chili cheese dog with onions and sub pasta for the bun. I’ll be using smoked cheddar, mozzarella and parrano for my cheeses, and I’ll add a little crumbled cracker on top.to help form a crust.

I’m also planning on doing some buttered, diced turnip roots as well as a pot of turnip greens. The latter will be trickier- I’m having trouble finding the ingredients! Usually, we do big batches when we do greens because they’re sorta labor intensive, and big batches means I can store leftovers in the fridge for later. Work once, eat many times. But instead of the 18-21 bunches of greens we usually use, I was only able to get 9 yesterday...and they had NO smoked meats whatsoever. So I have t go shopping again tomorrow.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Also, we’ve already started planning for Thanksgiving & Christmas dinner.

In all probability, it will not be possible to do a traditional big family gathering for either holiday. But we still want to enjoy them both as much as possible. So what we’re going to do is start making big batches of our favorite sides NOW, setting them aside in the freezer in small or middle sized containers that we can thaw later on the days in question.

...and also send some of those containers to our friends and family to share. Hopefully, there will be reciprocity. 😉

By starting now, I can spread out the hassle of dealing with some of the dishes over a bunch of time instead of the usual 72 hours or so. And my fridge won’t be overflowing with ingredients.

And when the holidays come, all we’ll have to do is warm the sides we want and cook a small bird.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Nothing to exciting. Cold night early spring rain so carb overload.

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Last ate sausages in lockdown around April. Lightly own fried in olive oil.

Chicken, broccoli, potato "salad".

Still eating nah oats, fruit, yoghurt for the other meals. Soy and linseed bread whatever that is.
 



Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Have you tried making your own sausages? Not only do I have a commercial recipe handed down through the family, I’ve also developed a couple recipes of my own.*

I’ve had some good chicken sausages in the past, and even though I’ve never made one, I bet it wouldn’t be too hard to do. Really, the only equipment you need is something to grind the meat. And the first time I made a pork sausage, I used my food processor for that task. (Took some doing, though. We have a grinder, now.)




* We generally gave up on actually stuffing the casings, and just make chubs we wrap in ziplock freezer bags instead.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Have you tried making your own sausages? Not only do I have a commercial recipe handed down through the family, I’ve also developed a couple recipes of my own.*

I’ve had some good chicken sausages in the past, and even though I’ve never made one, I bet it wouldn’t be too hard to do. Really, the only equipment you need is something to grind the meat. And the first time I made a pork sausage, I used my food processor for that task. (Took some doing, though. We have a grinder, now.)




* We generally gave up on actually stuffing the casings, and just make chubs we wrap in ziplock freezer bags instead.
No we don't really eat them that often and I don't think to hard what's in them.

And other types lot me pepperoni are off the menu for the most part (to much salt).

Since January I think we've used something like 100 grams of salt and a cup of suger.
 



prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
Supporter
@Dannyalcatraz I'd be interested in those sausage recipes, if the offer stands. The idea of making chubs in freezer bags appeals--I'm at least as likely to use sausage out of the casings as in.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
The Pickle Hunt May Be Over!


Our family fell in love with Nathan’s Kosher Dill pickles: crisp, dill but not too dill, big. Then they disappeared from our stores.

Then Carnegie Deli pickles appeared, and we thought they were every bit as good. But 18 months later, they, too, vanished.

I did some investigation, and found both had supposedly been made by the same small family company, and contacted them. The owner responded to my email himself, and confirmed they made both brands...using the exact same recipe. Alas, their products were not available in Texas.

We’ve been looking for a replacement for years now, and keep finding good pickles that weren’t quite up to snuff: too floppy, too spicy, some kind of odd flavor...

But today, we found and tried Bubbies. Nice dill flavor. Crisp texture. They’re a little smaller than the Nathan’s/Carnegie pickles, with just a hint of heat. The search may be over.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
@Dannyalcatraz I'd be interested in those sausage recipes, if the offer stands. The idea of making chubs in freezer bags appeals--I'm at least as likely to use sausage out of the casings as in.
I can’t give out the hot sausage one- that’s commercial and a secret.

Our pork sausage is less of a recipe and more of a piece of performance art. When you make most sausages, you need a certain amount of fat or it won’t hold its shape. We couldn’t find ground pork, so we ground up a pork loin chub and added vegetable oil.* Spices were salt, black pepper, powdered garlic, green onion, parsley, mustard powder and a single finely diced (puréed, really) jalapeño. There was also 1 cup of water per 5lbs of meat.

As I was taught, I pre-mix my spices. Then I gradually work the spices and water into the ground pork mix BY HAND and try to get an even mix without oversqueezing the meat. Too much manipulation messes up the texture. (This is one of the trickier bits.)

Like I said, we make chubs instead of stuffing casings these days. It saves us a step, and stuffing and tying off is more difficult than you’d think. This means we’re not tossing them on the grill.

But with a chub, it’s easier to make into patties, add to soups & casseroles, integrate into meatloaves, etc. You also don’t have to worry about the kind of casings you’re using.


* if I checked out a sausage making site, and they’d probably recommend something more like lard or shortening.**

** Edit: just looked- a lot of the posters claim you can get cheap or free pork fat from butchers. In general, they were aiming for @20%-30 fat in the sausage, 15% for lean. Some also suggested grinding up some bacon to include in the mix. Most recommended butt over loin, because it’s already fatty enough to use.
 
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Cadence

Legend
Supporter
Lol watched a video yesterday that recommend Baby Rays BBQ sauce.
I want to experiment with mixing horse-radish and chipotle at some point... I have no idea how it will turn out. For the horse-radish one, that Baby Rays is pretty good. The BBq is good too, but I don't know if I'd mix it with anything.
 
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Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
These are our generic store bought sauces we use. Mostly on home made burgers, fries or on home made pretend Turkish.
View attachment 126265

We've got some other ones but these are the basic ones.
I bet that garlic aoli is similar to the lebanese garlic spread I either buy or occasionally make myself. It’s essentially an emulsion of raw garlic in vegetable (not olive) oil, with a bit of salt and pepper added by some.

A local family sells a variant on that at the Farmers’ Market- they include pureed basil in it. It looks a bit like guacamole or wasabi.

The original and their variant are both great on sandwiches that are heavy on things like salami or ham.

And I like the original with all kinds of beef, lamb or chicken dishes.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
We’re condiment junkies. Dad buys huge hard of mayonnaise. There’s 3-4 different mustards in our fridge right now. A half dozen different salad dressings. Catsup. Cocktail sauce. Lebanese garlic spread. Creamy Horseradish. Chinese hot oil. 2 different bbq sauces. Soy. Teriyaki. Sriracha. Tabasco. Chili sauce. Maple syrup. Honey. Agave nectar. Chocolate syrup. Jellies & jams.

And not all of it is store bought...
 

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