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Cookin again

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Dinner:


Pan-fried ribeye, oven roasted Yukon gold potatoes and stir-fried zucchini with tomatoes and onions.
 

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Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member



I have often baked portobello caps to use as vegetarian burger substitutes, with good results. But I wanted to up my game a bit... I decided to stuff these after removing the stems and cleaning out the gills.

I marinated these caps in Shiner Bock for a few hours. Then I stuffed them with my usual omelette mix, topped with cotswold cheese.

I was a bit restrained in my seasoning: needed more salt and green onion, and the beer only slightly altered the mushrooms’ core flavor. So the results were a little underwhelming as-is. Sour cream would have been nice, but I was out. And cotswold was good, but not quite good enough.

As I sampled them different ways, the best variants were:
1) topped with tabouli;
2) served on a sandwich with mayo & mustard;
3) served on a sandwich with mayo & A-1 steak sauce.

In each case, the condiments or toppings effectively filled in the gaps on my light touch with the spices.

Final notes:

1) don’t get the biggest caps if you’re trying this out. They’re fine for a simple burger patty substitute, but their edges have usually lost their curl, and will not hold stuffing well. The best for stuffing are the medium-large ones- their edges are still curled enough to cup your stuffing.

2) these do reheat fairly well.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member

A light breakfast:
Blue D’auverne cheese topped with sliced Campari tomatoes, garlic sprouts, cracked pepper and yellow mustard on toasted sourdough. Side of white grapes.
 

Zardnaar

Legend



I have often baked portobello caps to use as vegetarian burger substitutes, with good results. But I wanted to up my game a bit... I decided to stuff these after removing the stems and cleaning out the gills.

I marinated these caps in Shiner Bock for a few hours. Then I stuffed them with my usual omelette mix, topped with cotswold cheese.

I was a bit restrained in my seasoning: needed more salt and green onion, and the beer only slightly altered the mushrooms’ core flavor. So the results were a little underwhelming as-is. Sour cream would have been nice, but I was out. And cotswold was good, but not quite good enough.

As I sampled them different ways, the best variants were:
1) topped with tabouli;
2) served on a sandwich with mayo & mustard;
3) served on a sandwich with mayo & A-1 steak sauce.

In each case, the condiments or toppings effectively filled in the gaps on my light touch with the spices.

Final notes:

1) don’t get the biggest caps if you’re trying this out. They’re fine for a simple burger patty substitute, but their edges have usually lost their curl, and will not hold stuffing well. The best for stuffing are the medium-large ones- their edges are still curled enough to cup your stuffing.

2) these do reheat fairly well.

Wife loves mushroom vegetarian burgers. Local stopped doing them after Covid lockdown.
 


Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Been drinking a lot more tea this year, and in a broader variety than ever before, ESPECIALLY since I had acquired a bunch of sampler boxes. The other night, I brewed up some camomile. To me, it had a flavor somewhere between woody and a wet towel. So I had pretty much decided never to buy any more after I finished this batch.

But tonight, I got another lesson in the curious alchemy of food & beverage pairings.

Tonight, you see, we got some takeout Tex-Mex. and I poured myself a tall glass of the iced camomile as my drink. And when I took the first sip after a few bites of my meal, instead of that woody flavor, it was floral.. That floral flavor persisted throughout the meal- the woodiness didn’t return until several minutes after I cleaned my plate and I was sipping the dregs of my tea.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Been drinking a lot more tea this year, and in a broader variety than ever before, ESPECIALLY since I had acquired a bunch of sampler boxes. The other night, I brewed up some camomile. To me, it had a flavor somewhere between woody and a wet towel. So I had pretty much decided never to buy any more after I finished this batch.

But tonight, I got another lesson in the curious alchemy of food & beverage pairings.

Tonight, you see, we got some takeout Tex-Mex. and I poured myself a tall glass of the iced camomile as my drink. And when I took the first sip after a few bites of my meal, instead of that woody flavor, it was floral.. That floral flavor persisted throughout the meal- the woodiness didn’t return until several minutes after I cleaned my plate and I was sipping the dregs of my tea.

Teas very hit or miss and yeah can vary with what you're eating.

Woody and wet towel is fair enough.

IMG_20201026_143917.jpg


Not gonna buy the left one again.
 

Ulfgeir

Adventurer
Been drinking a lot more tea this year, and in a broader variety than ever before, ESPECIALLY since I had acquired a bunch of sampler boxes. The other night, I brewed up some camomile. To me, it had a flavor somewhere between woody and a wet towel. So I had pretty much decided never to buy any more after I finished this batch.

But tonight, I got another lesson in the curious alchemy of food & beverage pairings.

Tonight, you see, we got some takeout Tex-Mex. and I poured myself a tall glass of the iced camomile as my drink. And when I took the first sip after a few bites of my meal, instead of that woody flavor, it was floral.. That floral flavor persisted throughout the meal- the woodiness didn’t return until several minutes after I cleaned my plate and I was sipping the dregs of my tea.
Also the temperatur of the water and how long it brews will affect the taste.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Definitely.

But this was a big batch- @7 cups or so- that I had been working on for a few days. And the only floral taste was while I was eating my Tex-Mex meal.*

I’ve encountered a similar phenomenon when eating some Stilton cheese with Shiner Bock beer. Took a swig of the beer. Then ate a few slices of Stilton. Then had another sip from my longneck...and had to do a double take. It tasted like a Dr. Pepper or similarly sweet cola.

I’ve repeated this combination with other variables. If I have something else between the Shiner and the Stilton, the effect is diminished or absent, dependent on time. If I drink the beer right after the cheese, it’s sweet.

According to food scientists, things like this happen because the two foods are depleting the same chemical receptors in the tongue. It takes a certain amount of time- just seconds- to replenish them. But those seconds are crucial.




* for the record, a chicken & rice soup w/avocado, a crispy beef taco, chicken & mushroom enchiladas with poblano sauce, beans, rice, grilled mixed veggies, and (of course) chips & salsa.
 


Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
I’m a dairy FIEND, but I have rarely had tea with milk in it. Once in an Indian restaurant. And EVERY time I go to Inlay, the Burmese restaurant up the road from me, I have their take in it, which uses sweetened condensed milk.

In fact, hot or iced, I generally drink my tea with only with lemon or lime juice. No sweetener, no milk.
 

Zardnaar

Legend
I’m a dairy FIEND, but I have rarely had tea with milk in it. Once in an Indian restaurant. And EVERY time I go to Inlay, the Burmese restaurant up the road from me, I have their take in it, which uses sweetened condensed milk.

In fact, hot or iced, I generally drink my tea with only with lemon or lime juice. No sweetener, no milk.

Yeah I think that's the way. Milk might be an English. The tropical tea was bleah tasted like soap. I forgot there were 4/5 left in bottom of box should have been a clue.

I didn't really start enjoying tea until a Turkish friend made me some.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Milky tea is, AFAIK, something invented by the Brits. If it wasn’t them, it was probably the Indians.

I don’t think it’s BAD, per se, but I find most teas, served straight or with citrus, really do a great job of cleansing the palate. And on a hot day, the bottom of a glass of iced tea that had lemon or lime in it just seems ...colder and more refreshing.

Ah! Forgot one other instance of milky tea in my life. Last year, I was at a chain restaurant that served soup, sandwich and salad buffet that included free soft-serve ice cream with the purchase of any meal. We were lingering, and I decided to try using the soft serve in place of ice in a glass of black tea. Essentially, a float using plain black tea instead of root beer or other carbonated drink.

...surprisingly, it worked! It had almost a dark chocolate on ice cream type flavor. I’ve done it a few times since the first time.
 


prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
Supporter
@Dannyalcatraz I think the food-beverage interactions you're talking about are the sorts of things sommeliers (and Cicerones, if you prefer beer) learn and talk about. The most-memorable one I've run into was an American IPA and a pizza with seriously spicy sausage on it--those just kept reinforcing each other; I have a couple of books on putting beer/s together with food, but I like beer so much on its own (and only have like one at a time because reasons) that it isn't something I so as much as I would prefer to.
 


Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member


Late night snack. Looks like a lot, but the plate is just 5.75” diameter.

Toasted Asiago Parmesan bread
Basil infused olive oil
Cracked black pepper
Cresenza cheese spread
Radish sprouts
San Marzano tomatoes
 

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