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Cookin again

prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
Supporter
Yep, that’s Le Creuset. Good eye!

The cooking was done covered.

I’ve done the corned beef with a few different, relatively mainstream beers, and they all seem to work. The first time I did it, I used Kirin. It was good, but salty...but that first time, I didn’t soak the meat first.

The results for this method are consistently moist & tender. I can’t recommend it enough. I have lived most of my life hating corned beef, only making it for my Mom, who loves the stuff. I steamed it, I baked it, etc. When I hit upon this idea and served it to her, she stopped after one bite and demanded I try it. I asked her what the problem was. She said that it was some of the best she’d ever had.
I'll keep the recipe in mind. This is a time of year when it's easy to find beers that aren't hops-focused--Oktoberfest-style lagers seem as though they'd play well here. I'm haven't been a big fan of corned beef heretofore, but I'll try it--especially if my wife thinks it seems like a good idea.

As for the Le Creuset, my wife had a couple of their dutch ovens (3-ish and 7-ish quarts, as I think of them) as wedding gifts from a previous marriage. We love them and use them a lot. While they are worth every penny, they are expensive enough that I was happy not to have to pay for them. :)
 

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Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member

I tried the last of my beer-braised corned beef with some creamy horseradish like I’d use with prime rib. It was pretty tasty, but I think it might have worked better with a little something more added to the horseradish.
 

prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
Supporter

I tried the last of my beer-braised corned beef with some creamy horseradish like I’d use with prime rib. It was pretty tasty, but I think it might have worked better with a little something more added to the horseradish.
I'm wondering if maybe Dijon-style mustard--laden as it is with horseradish--might have had the "little something more." I use it more as an ingredient than as a condiment, but this seems like a time for it.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
I'm wondering if maybe Dijon-style mustard--laden as it is with horseradish--might have had the "little something more." I use it more as an ingredient than as a condiment, but this seems like a time for it.
That probably would have been fine! I often use Dijon or spicy brown mustards when making corned beef or pastrami sandwiches.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Well, our Noritake dishes arrived, and in the process of unboxing, cleadjng and putting them away, I got some surprises.

They’re heavier than the Mikasa plates they’re replacing. Sizewise, most of them are within millimeters of the sizes of the plates they’re replacing, but the coffee mugs and salad bowls are noticeably larger.

The warranty is nice, too. Register your dishes, and you’re eligible to buy replacements for 50% off. We’re not too tough on our stuff, but accidents DO happen.

The BIG surprise, though, was that Noritake says these dishes are oven safe. That was completely unexpected. I’ve never seen that in everyday dishes. I may contact yhrm directly to find out what they consider the thermal limits are. Not that I intend to put the dishes to the test, but it would be good to know, ESPECIALLY since that could make using the toaster oven a little easier. (And I’ve been wanting to perfect a French Onion soup recipe...)
 




Zardnaar

Legend
Any suggestions that's not pancakes?

Staff sales at wife's job, picked up cheap.
IMG_20200901_171316.jpg


Very rarely eat maple syrup.
 




prabe

Aspiring Lurker (He/Him)
Supporter
Maple syrup ...

Use on (or in) ice cream.
Use in a pan sauce if you need a little sweet.
Use anywhere you might use sugar, as a change of pace.

I hear it's nice in coffee, but I haven't tried it (force of habit). I do, however, have a coffee-braised pot roast recipe that gets maple syrup added at the finish, so I'll believe it.

Remember that it needs refrigeration after it's opened, and that it's often nicer warmer. We always warm it before putting it on the table.

Vegetables ...

Since moving to a house with a convection oven, we've become big fans of high-temp roasting for veg. Anywhere from a touch of black to nice and dark, with olive oil, salt, black pepper, and Aleppo pepper.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Maple syrup ...

Use on (or in) ice cream.
Use in a pan sauce if you need a little sweet.
Use anywhere you might use sugar, as a change of pace.

I hear it's nice in coffee, but I haven't tried it (force of habit). I do, however, have a coffee-braised pot roast recipe that gets maple syrup added at the finish, so I'll believe it.

Remember that it needs refrigeration after it's opened, and that it's often nicer warmer. We always warm it before putting it on the table.
I’ve done maple syrup on ice cream. I’ve also used it as a drizzle on certain baked goods I make, as flavor-specific pairings subbing for honey.

Occasionally, agave nectar gets used that way, too.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member

An El Salvadoran chicken tamale
1/2 sliced avocado
4 sliced San Marzano Tomatoes
1 can reduced sodium chicken broth
1 tsp lemon juice

I’m not a huge tamale fan (for many reasons), but we were given some homemade ones recently...with promises of more coming soon. They really weren’t bad- kind of like a spicy chicken soup combined with the texture of matzoh balls. Which gave me this idea.

And I have to say, I could do this again with whatever tamales come my way. As I ate this, it was a tad bland- all of the seasoning came from the tamale- but I could taste the potential. A little more seasoning, maybe some shredded cheese. Possibly some sliced celery.

I also did some internet research and found out the obvious- I’m not the first to try this. There are lots of variants on this out there.
 

Zardnaar

Legend

An El Salvadoran chicken tamale
1/2 sliced avocado
4 sliced San Marzano Tomatoes
1 can reduced sodium chicken broth
1 tsp lemon juice

I’m not a huge tamale fan (for many reasons), but we were given some homemade ones recently...with promises of more coming soon. They really weren’t bad- kind of like a spicy chicken soup combined with the texture of matzoh balls. Which gave me this idea.

And I have to say, I could do this again with whatever tamales come my way. As I ate this, it was a tad bland- all of the seasoning came from the tamale- but I could taste the potential. A little more seasoning, maybe some shredded cheese. Possibly some sliced celery.

I also did some internet research and found out the obvious- I’m not the first to try this. There are lots of variants on this out there.
Would try, tamales haven't seen them here. Japanese tonight for another birthday night.
 


Ulfgeir

Adventurer
Today an experimental pasta-dish...

Chantarelles fried in butter and lots of coarsely ground black peppar, 1 Granny Smith apple chopped in pieces, and fried in butter and lots of cinnamon together with finely sliced red chili. The apple and mushrooms were then mixed with some cold suff: 1 finely chopped yellow bell peppar, Cherry tomatoes and finely cut leek. As sauce red wine winegar and acacia honey. And topped with walnuts.
 

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Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
If it’s good, I don’t care too much if it’s boring. If I’m eating it for the 8th meal in a row, THEN boring becomes an issue.

Several years ago, Mom made a HUGE batch of small banana pecan pancakes. They were very tasty, but after having them several meals in a row, I had to stop. I don’t know if I’ve had tgat kind of pancake since.

And I grew up eating PB & grape jelly sandwiches pretty often. Loved them. So when I went awa for my 1st year of college, my folks got me a 5lb can of Peter Pan and a 3lb jar of Welch’s Concorde Grape jelly. Because of renovations, only one of the school’s fining facilities was open for dinner service, and I kept getting there too late. So I ate a LOT of PB&J sandwiches.

I have not had grape jelly of any kind since 1987.
 

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