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D&D and the rising pandemic

FitzTheRuke

Legend
I take it as implying a physiological difference (but that is probably a hypothesis awaiting a "how"... aka not real solid science lol)
Then you gotta factor in the old nature vs nurture. Obviously, what makes a person is BOTH - but how much does brainwashing teaching/parenting factor into it?
 

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Garthanos

Arcadian Knight
They bred foxes based on low fear response to humans and in just a few generations physiological changes occurred they started getting doglike physical features... floppy ears and the like.
 

FitzTheRuke

Legend
Teaching a more extreme disgust reaction at rotten meat? ALMOST always relating to that other stuff.... just seems really really odd. Chicken and egg

Sure. It's not so much "Look at this rotten meat. You should find this foul!" kind of teaching, but more kids-watching-adults-react, and deciding that they will react that way too. My daughter was born a picky eater. My son was not. But he watched her decide that things were yucky enough to become picky over time. Now she's grown into an adventuresome eater (she'll at least try "weird" things - this she learned from me - I'll eat anything once. If it's good I'll eat it again!) while he still only likes to eat his "favourite" things. That's learned behavior.

(Of course, this also shows how much folly parenting can actually be - I have actively taught them to be experimental eaters. So far that only worked on one of them.)
 

niklinna

Looking for group
They bred foxes based on low fear response to humans and in just a few generations physiological changes occurred they started getting doglike physical features... floppy ears and the like.
Oh it wasn't doglike—it was domesticated. Pigs, horses, other domesticated animals have similar physiological features that their wild cousins don't! Fascinating stuff.
 

Garthanos

Arcadian Knight
Sure. It's not so much "Look at this rotten meat. You should find this foul!" kind of teaching, but more kids-watching-adults-react, and deciding that they will react that way too. My daughter was born a picky eater. My son was not. But he watched her decide that things were yucky enough to become picky over time. Now she's grown into an adventuresome eater (she'll at least try "weird" things - this she learned from me - I'll eat anything once. If it's good I'll eat it again!) while he still only likes to eat his "favourite" things. That's learned behavior.

(Of course, this also shows how much folly parenting can actually be - I have actively taught them to be experimental eaters. So far that only worked on one of them.)
Yes but now WHY is there an association with thinking loyalty is the primary virtue and believing lies like trickle down economics is a functional thing?
 
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Garthanos

Arcadian Knight
Oh it wasn't doglike—it was domesticated. Pigs, horses, other domesticated animals have similar physiological features that their wild cousins don't! Fascinating stuff.
Nods I brought up to point towards physical elements being connected with personality features. (in this case fear possibly paralleling disgust)
 



Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
The number of logical fallacies to that kind of thinking are adding up - Now you've got the Sunk Cost Fallacy to go with Occam and Hanlon's Razors (discussed previously).

Being tied into the Apple sphere isn't Sunk Cost. For example, if you get another iPhone, most of your old apps can be installed on your new phone at no extra cost. Move to Android, and you will have to find, and purchase, new applications, and so on.

If there's future work on one, but not the other, it isn't about sunk costs.

That said, sure, there's tons of logical fallacies in human behavior. What, you were of the opinion that our species was... rational, or something?
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
They bred foxes based on low fear response to humans and in just a few generations physiological changes occurred they started getting doglike physical features... floppy ears and the like.

If you are talking about what I expect you are, that's not quite what happened. It was a fairly famous Russian experiment to breed domesticated foxes - not specifically low fear response (that's too specific a trait to breed for), but tameness, which isn't exactly the same thing.

What they got wasn't actually doglike physical features. What they got was a fox that retained many traits of puppyhood later into life. One upshot of this was that their coats changed, mostly ruining the breed for farming purposes.
 

Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
If you are talking about what I expect you are, that's not quite what happened. It was a fairly famous Russian experiment to breed domesticated foxes - not specifically low fear response (that's too specific a trait to breed for), but tameness, which isn't exactly the same thing.

What they got wasn't actually doglike physical features. What they got was a fox that retained many traits of puppyhood later into life. One upshot of this was that their coats changed, mostly ruining the breed for farming purposes.
However, they- or their successors in interest- are currently running an exotic pet business selling those domesticated foxes.
 


niklinna

Looking for group
If you are talking about what I expect you are, that's not quite what happened. It was a fairly famous Russian experiment to breed domesticated foxes - not specifically low fear response (that's too specific a trait to breed for), but tameness, which isn't exactly the same thing.

What they got wasn't actually doglike physical features. What they got was a fox that retained many traits of puppyhood later into life. One upshot of this was that their coats changed, mostly ruining the breed for farming purposes.
Here we go: Domesticated silver fox – Wikipedia
 



Hussar

Legend
In this discussion about why people think this way or that, there's all sorts of factors as well.

My whole life I've been told that global warming was real, it's coming and it's going to be bad. And, everything I was told is coming true. But, you still have all sorts of folks resisting the narrative. Trying to get a carbon tax passed in Canada has been an incredibly divisive thing. If you believe that climate change isn't real, you don't have to change any of your behavior. But, if you accept that it's real, then you have to accept that you can't do certain things and you have to pay for certain things.

Heck, I'll take something personal - dieting. I know I should eat better. My whole life I've been fat. It's not like I don't know that it's bad for me or I'm ignorant of the facts. I just didn't care. Until, unfortunately, it caught up with me and now bread, pasta and rice are things I can only look at and admire from afar. :( But, there's lots of people who don't stop. I mean, if Type 2 Diabetes isn't going to stop someone, that's some serious cognitive dissonance going on.

You can rationalize just about anything if you really want to.

((On the plus side, I have dropped 25 kg since last May, so, I have actually managed to do a bit about my problems. I'm trying at least.))
 

Garthanos

Arcadian Knight
If you are talking about what I expect you are, that's not quite what happened. It was a fairly famous Russian experiment to breed domesticated foxes - not specifically low fear response (that's too specific a trait to breed for), but tameness, which isn't exactly the same thing.
it was low fear of humans which is definitely how they selected at first (and later lower aggression towards the humans providing for them ie hierarchic obedience? perhaps)... and yes that all was their running definition for domestication ie taming.
What they got wasn't actually doglike physical features.
May have been neotenous but the show I saw didnt mention that element but they very much would be identified as dog like traits and included floppy ears and changing tails and sometimes spotted fur and similar
 
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Zardnaar

Legend
13.8% unvaccinated locally. 25.8% single dose.



Cities big enough to have the amenities I like, small enough for that big town feel that avoids the problems of various places.
 

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