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D&D and the rising pandemic

Janx

Hero
Tangent:
With several tens of millions of COVID-vaccinated people to survey, a straightforward question could be asked: When did you get your shots, and how far apart were they? Please get an effectiveness test and report those results.
Most childhood vaccines that require two-plus shots are given 3 or 6 or 12 months apart, and they 'stick' for the long term. The current difficulty might be rooted in the two-to-six week schedule between shots being used.
Could be, but that's well outside my range for safe, ignorant, speculation. Experts (people who actually work with that stuff) figured out that schedule, who am I, to question it? Such questioning, particularly during this time of lying propaganda to get folks to not vaccinate undermines the efforts to save lives.
 

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Retreater

Legend
So how bad is it in sane US states and what's considered a good vaccination rates?
My state is pretty bad. Our vaccination rate is around 56% of eligible people. Our infection rate has been 10%. It's the worst we've ever been, but at least it's plateauing.
Our governor was praised at the start of the pandemic for how he handled it, but the naysayers got in and factions are taking away his authority. Now it's running rampant and unchecked. He's forbidden from issuing any more mandates and is basically only a mouthpiece to beg people every day to get vaccines and be responsible.
If anything else is going to be legislated in my state, it must come from the U.S. federal government. Otherwise, I don't know what the death count is going to look like.
The vaccine is only good for so long. Maybe if enough people can get it at the same time, this will go away (instead of mutating).
 


Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Most childhood vaccines that require two-plus shots are given 3 or 6 or 12 months apart, and they 'stick' for the long term. The current difficulty might be rooted in the two-to-six week schedule between shots being used.

With respect, it isn't like those making these vaccine are unaware of other protocols. But everyone seems to be an immunology expert these days...

When we say "covid is not the flu" we don't mean that just in terms of how it is a nastier disease. It is literally not the same kind of virus. In terms of taxonomic classification, covid is not the flu in the same way that your dog is not a clam - they are of different phylum classification.

Measels, Covid, and Mumps are all different, on sort of the same level as dogs, clams, and starfish are different. So, no, there is no silver bullet to generate long-lasting vaccine efficacy against them all. Dosing farther apart is not magical. It is merely the effective pattern for some diseases.
 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
California, where I live, is apparently doing at least as well as anyone: 72% have at least one dose, 59% are fully vaccinated.
Here in Massachusetts, we have 73% at least partial, 66% full.

When speaking of boosters and long-lasting vaccine effectiveness, we should note that the news isn't all bad. Pfizer's efficacy against infection drops as time goes on. Its efficacy against hospitalization and death seems to stay very high.

So, in a personal sense folks are still pretty safe. The issue is that the pool of infected people may grow.

But also note that, at the moment, the pool of infected people in the US is not growing. It has been dropping notably since the start of September. The case curve in MA is pretty typical:
1633706440783.png

This seems to be a bit of a pattern for covid - a surge comes in for a couple of months, and then recedes. Why is not yet known - it may be something about the virus, or it may be something about human action in the face of the virus.
 


Dannyalcatraz

Schmoderator
Staff member
Here in Massachusetts, we have 73% at least partial, 66% full.

When speaking of boosters and long-lasting vaccine effectiveness, we should note that the news isn't all bad. Pfizer's efficacy against infection drops as time goes on. Its efficacy against hospitalization and death seems to stay very high.

So, in a personal sense folks are still pretty safe. The issue is that the pool of infected people may grow.

But also note that, at the moment, the pool of infected people in the US is not growing. It has been dropping notably since the start of September. The case curve in MA is pretty typical:

This seems to be a bit of a pattern for covid - a surge comes in for a couple of months, and then recedes. Why is not yet known - it may be something about the virus, or it may be something about human action in the face of the virus.
Yep, that’s the pattern I mentioned a few days ago.

The thing is, I was listening to some MDs discuss C19’s pattern in the context of 2 previous pandemics (2009 & 1918) that had similar patterns. One thing they noted was that about this time in their waves, experts predicted more surges…that didn’t come. The rates rose a bit, but didn’t spike, and thereafter stayed low. The educated guess is that- while herd immunity hadn’t been reached- enough people had been exposed to make a true spike essentially impossible,

They were thinking we at that same point with Covid right now. Enough have been exposed or vaccinated that we’re past the worst. (Barring a horror-show mutation, of course.)
 

Zardnaar

Legend
Just wondering what Covids gonna do with more or less intact set of fresh victims. Vaccination rates seem higher and it's around 94% with the older crowd.

With decking death rates you've already had Las years deaths so it's running out of easy marks.

Last night they locked down another regiin due to uncooperative spreader. Social media is saying prostitute.

So in Auckland it leaked into the homeless and gangs and spread from there. And we have some of the lowest ICU numbers in the OECD.

Turns out running things down for 40 years is a bad idea.
 
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Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
Moderna has been using their vaccine out of the hands of poor countries in order to make more money.

 

Umbran

Mod Squad
Staff member
Moderna has been using their vaccine out of the hands of poor countries in order to make more money.

Did anyone expect differently?

Moderna is not a big-time pharma company - prior to the covid vaccine, they were a research shop developing the mRNA technology. The covid vaccine is their first, and still only, commercial product, and its revenue will dry up when the pandemic recedes. They have an opportunity at a year or two of windfall*, and will try to maximize that opportunity.


*In this case, windfall on the order of 6000% increase in revenue year-over year. They were not a billion-dollar revenue company before the vaccine.
 

FitzTheRuke

Legend
I don't have a problem with it if they put a lot of it back into their research and not just split it up among their top 5 shareholders. (I'm not so anti-capitalist that I mind them sharing some of it among themselves, but I object to all (or even most) of it.)

I have no problem with people getting rich, but I draw the line before it gets to uber-rich.
 

Moderna has been using their vaccine out of the hands of poor countries in order to make more money.

...

About 1 million doses of Moderna’s vaccine have gone to countries that the World Bank classifies as low income. By contrast, 8.4 million Pfizer doses and about 25 million single-shot Johnson & Johnson doses have gone to those countries.

Don't most low-income countries prefer the J&J version because it only requires one dose? In many areas of the world (including parts of the US), a second visit with a doctor is a major barrier to vaccination.

I'm not saying if other claims about Moderna are or aren't true. Just that one set of numbers doesn't tell the whole story.
 

Maxperson

Morkus from Orkus
Don't most low-income countries prefer the J&J version because it only requires one dose? In many areas of the world (including parts of the US), a second visit with a doctor is a major barrier to vaccination.

I'm not saying if other claims about Moderna are or aren't true. Just that one set of numbers doesn't tell the whole story.
That's probably true, which would explain why Johnson & Johnson has delivered 3x more doses to those countries than Pfizer has. Pfizer, though, wasn't called out. Probably because it has 8x the doses delivered to poor countries that Moderna has. Moderna has delived 1 million, Pfizer 8.something million and Johnson & Johnson 25 million.
 

Garthanos

Arcadian Knight
Don't most low-income countries prefer the J&J version because it only requires one dose? In many areas of the world (including parts of the US), a second visit with a doctor is a major barrier to vaccination.
It is looking like its significantly better to subsequently get a pfizer/moderna shot after getting the J&J one I read.
I'm not saying if other claims about Moderna are or aren't true. Just that one set of numbers doesn't tell the whole story.
 

Garthanos

Arcadian Knight
My state is pretty bad. Our vaccination rate is around 56% of eligible people. Our infection rate has been 10%. It's the worst we've ever been, but at least it's plateauing.
Our vacc rate in my county of eligible age 12 plus is higher than 70%

I should be eligible for the booster shot sometime soon I hope
 


Garthanos

Arcadian Knight

niklinna

Looking for group
This is one place I think ... I may have seen it somewhere else originally.

Huh. I would have expected a follow-on of Moderna/Pfizer to be the full two-dose protocol. Curious. In any case, not a study of efficacy, just lots of people wanting to do this.
 

Eltab

Lord of the Hidden Layer
Don't most low-income countries prefer the J&J version because it only requires one dose? In many areas of the world (including parts of the US), a second visit with a doctor is a major barrier to vaccination.
IIRC, J&J requires only normal freezing temperatures, not a super-deep freeze. If it can be preserved and effective in a level of cold that can be supplied by packing in dry ice, that is a leg up for distribution to places where electricity (and freezers) are scarce.
 

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